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PA, Amps, and avoiding electrocution


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So, I've got a question related to hooking up all the stuff in our spanking new practice space. I BELIEVE I know what I need to do, but I'm a tad confused on how to execute properly.

 

We just got extremely lucky and moved into a practice space larger than almost anywhere I've ever lived. For the first time in many years I can actually move while playing my instrument. We've taken advantage of this and spread out over the space. I just want to make sure we set everything up in such a way that none of us gets electrocuted by a microphone.

 

I've got an outlet tester, so I can check to make sure everything has proper grounding. That said, I see to remember that the best way to avoid issues is to have everything running through the same outlet through a surge protector. By everything I mean the PA, amps, effects, keyboard, etc. Obviously things like lighting should be kept apart, although since we use almost entirely LEDs that tends to be less of a concern.

 

However, in our case "everything" still really begins to add up. Mesa Triple Rectifier (god I hate that amp), GK 1001 (being replaced shortly with a 79 SVT), two Mac laptops, two MOTU interfaces, a M-Audio Axiom 61, a Korg MicroKorg, two Line 6 M13s, a QSC GX5, and a Mackie ProFX12.

 

I was wondering if someone could help explain to me what math exactly do I need to do in order to make sure that:

 

1. We don't trip a breaker.

2. We have sufficiently large gage power cables.

 

This is the room of dreams...I don't want to burn it down!

 

Thanks for your time in advance; I really appreciate it!

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PA, Amps, and avoiding electrocution

 

Avoiding the last one is easy. Be choosy about which states you commit 1st degree murder in :-).

 

Seriously, it's not necessary to plug everything into the same outlet. Idealy it should be from the same transformer leg but even that isn't necessary, Just make sure you have a common neutral and you are good to go.

 

As long as all of your circuits (outlets) are fed from the same breaker box, then (if wired properly) they SHOULD share a common neutral. Typicaly a cheapo outlet tester won't tell you if the ground (safety green wire & or grounded conduit connection) and the neutral are swapped. This takes an extension cord and a meter. If you're not sure what to check & how to be extremely careful about it, have someone qualified do it for you.

 

That's my .02

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Thanks for the help!

 

So basically, if every plug in the room is on the same breaker then there shouldn't be any issues if we hook things into different outlets (assuming things are wired properly)?

 

Is there a "best practices" way to check that everything has a common neutral if I can confirm they are all on the same breaker?

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