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bildo

OT: Tinnitus

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I imagine we all suffer from it to some extent. Mine from loud race cars and motorcycles from the times when they were not really silenced. Music bombardment too. Land of the Marshall walls(wait, could trump build a Marshall wall we could plug into?) kicking our ears in.

 

I used to love sitting out with my PAPA(Grandfather) in the yard at dusk and listen to the cicadas make their racket. Just did not count on it become a 24/7 deal. Funny thing is I have no trouble with it trying to sleep. Seems like my Kidney and gastro ailments seem to make it rage when they go at me. Especially the kidney stuff.

 

I actually have pretty acute hearing despite this. Bildette is always surprised at the quiet things I can hear.

 

very weird aliment.

 

Suffered from bad ear infections from a lot of time in the water(I almost lived in the pool or in the coastal waters). Curbed them after I started using an alcohol/vinegar and sometimes a little Hydrogen peroxide. Always two drops in each ear after being in the water.

 

My ears are pretty close to my head(don't stick out goofily) and pretty symmetrical.

 

Think that covers everything about my ears.

 

Let's her about your ears.

 

oh...and they are fun to nibble on...

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Posted (edited)

I had the loudest drummer on earth and I can still hear his GD cymbals.:cry:

Edited by Daehtihs

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Funny, I've driven race cars, played loud-as-he11 rock and sat in front of blaring symphonic horn sections, shot pistols, scuba'd and generally done everything that is supposed to be bad for your hearing. The last time I went to an audiologist to be checked, he told me that I won the genetic lottery - I have zero hearing degradation.

 

I guess I'm just lucky - sorry to hear of the struggles you guys are going through. I'm pretty sure that my time will come eventually, and it won't be enjoyable.

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My ears are ringing like hell as I write. :( It's 24-7 with me.

 

But are they goofy like your avatars?

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I can hear the operating rod of the M60 machinegun and it won't cease fire...

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I’ve had tinnitus since my 20s. I only notice it when lying in bed and it’s really quiet. And, like you, it’s never seemed to affect my hearing and I can pick up berg quiet sounds.

 

Voices in my right ear sound muffled and I often have to cock my left ear towards people to make out what they are saying. But it hasn’t seemed to affect the frequency range I hear.

 

Which isnt much in either ear anymore. I’ve taken those online hearing test and seem to top out at around 12kh or so.

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Funny, I've driven race cars, played loud-as-he11 rock and sat in front of blaring symphonic horn sections, shot pistols, scuba'd and generally done everything that is supposed to be bad for your hearing. The last time I went to an audiologist to be checked, he told me that I won the genetic lottery - I have zero hearing degradation.

 

I guess I'm just lucky - sorry to hear of the struggles you guys are going through. I'm pretty sure that my time will come eventually, and it won't be enjoyable.

 

Great to hear that SH. I know you have been around a lot of the damagers(is that a made up word?). Hope you always stay without it. At least there are no voices....unless you think of it as choir.

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All of the fan motors don't help things for me either, I can hear resonant frequencies everywhere. Two the the motors are tuned to C and every harmonic possible. There is a virtual symphony in my head this time of year. It messes with my mastering skills, what little I have.

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I am truly fortunate - at age 54, and a lifetime spent recording and playing music, I have no tinnitus, and as of last year when I had my hearing tested, I can still hear up to 16.5KHz.

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I’ve had tinnitus since my 20s. I only notice it when lying in bed and it’s really quiet. And, like you, it’s never seemed to affect my hearing and I can pick up berg quiet sounds.

 

Voices in my right ear sound muffled and I often have to cock my left ear towards people to make out what they are saying. But it hasn’t seemed to affect the frequency range I hear.

 

Which isnt much in either ear anymore. I’ve taken those online hearing test and seem to top out at around 12kh or so.

 

Yes, my left ear is worse in picking up things. I need to get a test. Seems like when you are busy with things it is gone.

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Yes, my left ear is worse in picking up things. I need to get a test. Seems like when you are busy with things it is gone.

 

Like yours, my wife is always amazed at the little things I can pick up. So much so that I suggested she have her hearing checked. It came back fine. I think it’s more just having my ears “on” more. Probably a musician thing. Im naturally paying more attention to background sounds and she’s blocking them out

 

as far as getting hearing checked goes through? Yeah I guess it’s interesting to know but it’s not like there is much anyone can do about it.

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I got smart at a young age and started wearing earplugs during practices, performances, and concerts.

 

Only thing I've noticed over time is that my left is slightly more deaf than my right. Or at least that's what my headphone balance tells me. :idk:

 

Pretty acute and high range, otherwise. I can't remember the last time I actually got tested, though.

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Even if I did have tinnitus, I wouldn't be able to hear it on account of the ringing in my ears.

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I've had it for as long as I can remember. It's just background noised to me, doesn't bother me at all.

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as far as getting hearing checked goes through? Yeah I guess it’s interesting to know but it’s not like there is much anyone can do about it.

 

Not after the fact, no. However, there are lots of preventive things that can be done, and over the years

I have been relentlessly annoying about telling people, especially younger recording engineers and musicians.

 

When it comes to hearing loss, the real culprit isn't the decibel level - its prolonged exposure. Short term exposure to high db will rarely, if ever, do sny irrecoverable damage (unless its a transient loud enough to rupture an eardrum). Otoh, prolonged, repeated exposure to even moderately loud signal will.

 

When listening/monitoring, ALWAYS cycle your volume. Its ok to crank it up, jys2t do2bt keep it there.

 

Avoid prolonged headphone usage like the plague. Don't use headphones as your primary monitorung source, ever.

 

If you're a gigging musician, I recommend ear protection, but only if you are gigging consistently, like several times a week (or if you play metal :lol: ). For those of us like myself who gig maybe twice a month, with moderate stage volume, I think earplugs are unnecessary and annoying.

 

 

 

 

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Hey Bildo, sorry to 'hear' that, if you'll excuse the expression.

It's a progressive deterioration, to be sure. Sooner or later most of us suffer hearing loss to a greater or lesser degree. And it starts remarkably early; in our 20s! At the bottom of this post, I'll include a bit about the hi frerq device known as the 'mosquito'.

Of course, there is the occasional person who can differentiate between the African and English swallow strictly by the variation in sound of their wingspeed.

 

 

 

[/url]The Mosquito or Mosquito alarm is a hand wound machine used to deter Mosquito alarm or The Mosquitoloitering by young people by emitting sound at high frequency, in some versions so it can be heard mostly by younger people. The devices have attracted controversy on the basis of human rights and discrimination concerns.

 

The device is marketed as a safety and security tool for preventing youths from congregating in specific areas. As such, it is promoted to reduce anti-social behaviour, such as loitering, vandalism, drug use, drug distribution, and violence. In the UK, over 3,000 have been sold, mainly for use outside shops and near transport hubs.[2] The device is also sold in Australia, France, Denmark, Italy, Spain, Germany, Switzerland, Canada and the USA.[3]

 

Critics say that it discriminates against young people and infringes their human rights, while supporters argue that making the Mosquito illegal would infringe the rights of shopkeepers who suffer business losses when "unruly teenagers" drive away their customers.[4] Mosquito distributors have said that they keep standards to ensure that the device is not abused, and Howard Stapleton who invented the device has asked European governments to legislate guidelines governing its use.[3]

 

 

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Posted (edited)

 

Not after the fact, no. However, there are lots of preventive things that can be done, and over the years

I have been relentlessly annoying about telling people, especially younger recording engineers and musicians.

 

When it comes to hearing loss, the real culprit isn't the decibel level - its prolonged exposure. Short term exposure to high db will rarely, if ever, do sny irrecoverable damage (unless its a transient loud enough to rupture an eardrum). Otoh, prolonged, repeated exposure to even moderately loud signal will.

 

When listening/monitoring, ALWAYS cycle your volume. Its ok to crank it up, jys2t do2bt keep it there.

 

Avoid prolonged headphone usage like the plague. Don't use headphones as your primary monitorung source, ever.

 

If you're a gigging musician, I recommend ear protection, but only if you are gigging consistently, like several times a week (or if you play metal :lol: ). For those of us like myself who gig maybe twice a month, with moderate stage volume, I think earplugs are unnecessary and annoying.

 

 

 

 

Yep. But for all of us on this forum discussing it here? We are all well past the age of effective protection.

 

But for me, I can’t recommend IEMs highly enough. I don’t know if I play often enough anymore for it to matter or not, but I can’t believe that not coming home with ringing ears can be anything but a positive in terms of preserving what hearing I have left for as long as I can.

Edited by Vito Corleone
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Around the age of 35 I got a viral infection that left me completely deaf in my left ear.

 

Except for the tinnitus.

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People have a sense of silence I've never known. From as far back as I can remember I've had a jet engine idling in each ear, and at mid throttle when I'm tired. Mine is bilateral tinnitus (both ears) and fits the studies pointing to genetics instead of environmental causation. My pop had it. He would crank up the stereo in the garage and while away the hours under the hood of his cars, though they were always in top condition, piddling about keeping his mind off his tinnitus. As a career pilot he was always distracted from it but it made him irritable and intolerant otherwise.

 

I've been told I should have the VA check mine out to get some kind of disability for it due to my noise exposure while in uniform. Lot's of people I know are doing that. Knowing what I know about it, I can't make that claim. What I might do is research those noise-cancelling ear buds. As I understand it, a cancelling frequency is dialed into them that basically attenuates the tinnitus frequency.

 

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/03/170309120434.htm

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I have moderate ringing. Doesn't bother me...yet. I attribute it mainly to:

1. Driving tractors under full load all day long, the exhaust tip only five feet in front of my head.

2. Riding motorcycles.

3. Shooting guns.

4. Driving with the window down and the radio up.

5. 50 watts through a 2x12.

6. Concerts.

7. Listening to music.

8. Working around machinery.

 

I could go on.

Now I use molded noise filters. Wish I had those forty-five years ago.

 

I used to spray insecticides and fungicides without any protection too, holding my breath and ducking while turning through the mist. The state finally required we suit up. Thank God for government...sometimes.

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Posted (edited)

Mine came from nearly 40 years of sirens. Mostly the electronic type, but there was also the occasional Federal "Q' siren on the larger fire trucks, plus the frequent use of air horns. To make matters worse, you would respond with the windows down - winter, spring, summer, fall. The left side window all the way down, the right side window half down. That way you could hopefully tell if another piece of apparatus was coming to greet you at an intersection. Also allowed you to hear what was going on as you approached the scene (if you hear gun shots, don't proceed any further into the scene).

 

Today, most of the apparatus is equipped with the headphones like you see pilots use. Built in radio, muffles the outside noise. Lots of improvements over the years.

Edited by Mandolin Picker

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I found something kind of interesting while trying to determine the frequency of my tinitus. If you listen to the matching frequency, then stop listening, the tinitus will temporarily go away. You can give it a try using the audio frequency generator here: https://www.szynalski.com/tone-generator/

I just tried it again. I doesn't seem to have to be spot on. I just play the tone, then click Stop and no tinitus for a few seconds.

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