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It’s Never Too Late to Start a Brilliant Career

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The article: It’s Never Too Late to Start a Brilliant Career

 

This is a fascinating look at how and when the average human brain matures and reaches peaks of productivity/usefulness. It speaks to why I think the voting age should be 25 as well as offers hope to twenty-somethings that think they are never going to accomplish much.

 

It also explains the sincerity of the back-handed compliment us older guys sometimes shower on younger guys: "I like you. You remind me of myself when I was young and stupid."

 

As a 75 year old, I can relate to what it is saying about the human brain. One of the interesting things is that I believe it explains how we can live in a world where a very high IQ person can work for a "lower IQ" guy that has become a multimillionaire. IQ is but one measurement of brain function.And many of those functions drastically improve with age. Personally, I've experienced it.

 

Any way, I thought this was actually a very instructional, interesting, motivational and uplifting article about how we think.

 

Enjoy!

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The article: It’s Never Too Late to Start a Brilliant Career

 

This is a fascinating look at how and when the average human brain matures and reaches peaks of productivity/usefulness. It speaks to why I think the voting age should be 25 as well as offers hope to twenty-somethings that think they are never going to accomplish much.

 

It also explains the sincerity of the back-handed compliment us older guys sometimes shower on younger guys: "I like you. You remind me of myself when I was young and stupid."

 

As a 75 year old, I can relate to what it is saying about the human brain. One of the interesting things is that I believe it explains how we can live in a world where a very high IQ person can work for a "lower IQ" guy that has become a multimillionaire. IQ is but one measurement of brain function.And many of those functions drastically improve with age. Personally, I've experienced it.

 

Any way, I thought this was actually a very instructional, interesting, motivational and uplifting article about how we think.

 

Enjoy!

 

Bob Dylan had 6 albums out before he was 25.

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The article: It’s Never Too Late to Start a Brilliant Career

 

This is a fascinating look at how and when the average human brain matures and reaches peaks of productivity/usefulness. It speaks to why I think the voting age should be 25 as well as offers hope to twenty-somethings that think they are never going to accomplish much.

 

It also explains the sincerity of the back-handed compliment us older guys sometimes shower on younger guys: "I like you. You remind me of myself when I was young and stupid."

 

As a 75 year old, I can relate to what it is saying about the human brain. One of the interesting things is that I believe it explains how we can live in a world where a very high IQ person can work for a "lower IQ" guy that has become a multimillionaire. IQ is but one measurement of brain function.And many of those functions drastically improve with age. Personally, I've experienced it.

 

Any way, I thought this was actually a very instructional, interesting, motivational and uplifting article about how we think.

 

Enjoy!

That statement never stops being insulting.There is nothing complimentary about it.

And is never quite so clever, IMHO.

It smacks of the boorish old fart who thinks he knows it all.

 

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Bob Dylan had 6 albums out before he was 25.

 

Yep. That's what made him special, musically. His work far surpassed his age. Such lyrics from so few years of life experience was amazing.

 

But prodigy's don't really count.

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Posted (edited)

That statement never stops being insulting.There is nothing complimentary about it.

And is never quite so clever, IMHO.

It smacks of the boorish old fart who thinks he knows it all.

 

That's why it is "backhanded". I've actually read posts from young guys here that were idiotic, yet belied a better understanding of how the world works than I had at their age - and their thought process, though dead wrong, was similar to mine at that age.

 

So sure, it will always be taken as an insult, but as the person matures and reflects on it, they will get what the "old guy" was saying.

 

I say that as an old guy that was insulted by old guys when I was young. I came to realize, as I matured, that many of them were right. Of course, some people never mature. Hence the phrase, "With age comes wisdom, but sometimes age comes alone."

Edited by Easy Listener

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That's why it is "backhanded". I've actually read posts from young guys here that were idiotic, yet belied a better understanding of how the world works than I had at their age - and their thought process, though dead wrong, was similar to mine at that age.

 

So sure, it will always be taken as an insult, but as the person matures and reflects on it, they will get what the "old guy" was saying.

 

I say that as an old guy that was insulted by old guys when I was young. I came to realize, as I matured, that many of them were right. Of course, some people never mature. Hence the phrase, "With age comes wisdom, but sometimes age comes alone."

Yeah, I'm pretty sure I understand the 'concept' of the 'backhanded compliment'.

 

I'm an old guy and I would never dream of saying that to a young man or woman with promise and enthusiasm.

It's arrogant and obnoxious.

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Yeah, I'm pretty sure I understand the 'concept' of the 'backhanded compliment'.

 

I'm an old guy and I would never dream of saying that to a young man or woman with promise and enthusiasm.

It's arrogant and obnoxious.

 

I agree. I've used it maybe twice in my life. It's kinda like a gun. You rarely, if ever, need it. But sometimes it is necessary and the target so righteously deserves it.

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I agree. I've used it maybe twice in my life. It's kinda like a gun. You rarely, if ever, need it. But sometimes it is necessary and the target so righteously deserves it.

 

I’ve seen you use it here several times.

 

Are you lying? Or just getting forgetful in your old age. :D

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My brain still tells my body to do things it can't do any more. The it laughs at my hurting body.

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I’ve seen you use it here several times.

 

Are you lying? Or just getting forgetful in your old age. :D

 

This is the only place I've ever used it. And I think "several" is a stretch, though I may have included the phrase as something I'm talking about rather than pointing it at someone.

 

But it generally applies to all young people. It's what being young is all about. It's that age where you are aware you know a lot more than you knew five years ago but haven't yet realized that most people older than you reached that point and have built on it - considerably so. i.e. you seem so smart compared to before, but are forgetting how dumb you are compared to the future you (and many people currently the age of the future you).

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My brain still tells my body to do things it can't do any more. The it laughs at my hurting body.

 

:D:D:D

 

Reminds me of the phrase I recently heard: "I used to believe that my brain is my most important organ, but then I realized it was my brain telling me that."

 

 

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This is the only place I've ever used it. And I think "several" is a stretch, though I may have included the phrase as something I'm talking about rather than pointing it at someone.

 

i thought that was just you being backhanded :)

 

 

But it generally applies to all young people. It's what being young is all about. It's that age where you are aware you know a lot more than you knew five years ago but haven't yet realized that most people older than you reached that point and have built on it - considerably so. i.e. you seem so smart compared to before, but are forgetting how dumb you are compared to the future you (and many people currently the age of the future you).

 

So basically what you are saying here is that you thought you were smarter than everyone when you were young, and now that you realize you weren’t then, you still believe you are now.

 

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Yep. That's what made him special, musically. His work far surpassed his age. Such lyrics from so few years of life experience was amazing.

 

But prodigy's don't really count.

 

They don't provide rationale for allowing 18 year-olds to vote? Not to mention that your age group has a passion for sending 18 year-olds to war.

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Posted (edited)

 

i thought that was just you being backhanded :)

 

 

 

So basically what you are saying here is that you thought you were smarter than everyone when you were young, and now that you realize you weren’t then, you still believe you are now.

 

Nope. What I'm saying is that I am smarter than I was when I was young, as is pretty much everyone that has not suffered brain damage or heavy drug use since then.

 

Think of it like this: I see a lot of fat people, but I don't make a habit of telling fat people they are fat - unless they are part of the "Fat is beautiful and in my face about it" movement.

Edited by Easy Listener

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They don't provide rationale for allowing 18 year-olds to vote? Not to mention that your age group has a passion for sending 18 year-olds to war.

 

Rationale: Brain not fully developed until around age 25. "Executive" function not fully developed. The ability to plan, think long term, etc.

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Nope. What I'm saying is that I am smarter than I was when I was young, as is pretty much everyone that has not suffered brain damage or heavy drug use since then.

 

Think of it like this: I see a lot of fat people, but I don't make a habit of telling fat people they are fat - unless they are part of the "Fat is beautiful and in my face about it" movement.

 

yet another analogy that makes no sense:facepalm:

 

Did you think you were smarter than everyone else when you were young or not?

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Rationale: Brain not fully developed until around age 25. "Executive" function not fully developed. The ability to plan, think long term, etc.

 

I disagree, I believe that a person that can join (or be drafted) into a nation's military should have the right to vote. "Executive" function fully developed or not.

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Posted (edited)

We reach peak neural performance around 25. After that, a number of matters of acuity (especially speed and creativity) usually decrease; WISDOM will likely continue to accrue, but neural plasticity and a number of other factors decrease. Being “smart” is a combo of physiology and experience, and I do think I’m WISER than I was back when. But there’s a lot I can’t do the same and could not learn nearly as easily.

 

Im aiming to start a new career at 39. My performance on entrance exams last year was markedly slower/worse than when I was 17. (Though my age is definitely not the only factor.).... I also need much more sleep these days darnit.

 

Others pointed to musicians. I’ll point to Einstein. He had his has his “Anna mirabilis,” the most groundbreaking discoveries conceived and mathematically proven in his head, at age 26.

 

Regardless, it’s good to hear some encouragement that my life isn’t over yet!

Edited by arcadesonfire
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yet another analogy that makes no sense

Make of it what you will.

Did you think you were smarter than everyone else when you were young or not?

I thought i was smarter than some and dumber than others. Math was so easy it was ridiculous. English, not so much.

 

 

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I disagree, I believe that a person that can join (or be drafted) into a nation's military should have the right to vote. "Executive" function fully developed or not.

 

I don't see it that way. I did back during the vietnam war, but I've revised my thinking - probably because my brain matured past the age of 25. My "executive" processes had fully developed. You don't need it to fight in the military. You do need it to make wise decisions in the voting booth.

 

Your logic is what caused a lot of states to lower the drinking age to 18, only to increase it later.

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Old men start wars...……..young men die in them. Where's the wisdom and logic in that?

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Old men start wars...……..young men die in them. Where's the wisdom and logic in that?

 

That's because the old men are in charge. Personally, I think it would be much worse if young men are in charge. In fact, in days of old was it not typical for leaders to be not all that old?

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If we barred people under 25 from voting, wouldn’t we need to stop taxing them? “No taxation without representation.”

 

And if we were to argue that people under 25 are all too dumb to vote, then we could also argue that only people with certain grades or SAT scores or whatever should be allowed to vote, cuz otherwise they’re too dumb.

 

We could also point to trends in how neural factors (such as memory) tend to decrease in older age and thereby argue that there should be an age cap on voting.

 

With this (and more) in mind, the idea that we should raise the voting age seems silly. (And it’s predicated on a misunderstanding of neural development.)

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Make of it what you will.

 

 

I did

 

I thought i was smarter than some and dumber than others. Math was so easy it was ridiculous. English, not so much.

 

 

What about older folks? Did you think you knew more than they did?

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That's because the old men are in charge. Personally, I think it would be much worse if young men are in charge. In fact, in days of old was it not typical for leaders to be not all that old?

 

Forget old men. What if old women were in charge? Heck, it doesn't have to be old women. Just put women of all ages in charge and the world would be better for it.

 

Make of that what you will and I trust you will EL. :p

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Posted (edited)

Make of it what you will.

 

I thought i was smarter than some and dumber than others. Math was so easy it was ridiculous. English, not so much.

 

 

I wonder how you would’ve felt in honors calc III with Sandy Grabiner. I entered college with a chip on shoulder. This class swiftly crushed it and sprinkled it away like the thinnest of Lay’s salty snacks. Oh the brutality!

Edited by arcadesonfire

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I can relate to the article. 26 was a bad year. I had a nowhere job, no girlfriend, etc. But I was a manager in my early 30's and wrote my first song at 50.

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Bob Dylan had 6 albums out before he was 25.

 

Right place, right time, right music.

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Posted (edited)

Einstein published his Theory of Relativity when he was 25. The Beatles broke up before they were 30. Jimi Hendrix was dead at 27 and Mozart at 35.

 

i would Imagine that if you catalogued all the great artists of the world, that you would find more were at their most creative and inventive before the age of 30 than after.

Edited by Vito Corleone

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The article: It’s Never Too Late to Start a Brilliant Career

 

This is a fascinating look at how and when the average human brain matures and reaches peaks of productivity/usefulness. It speaks to why I think the voting age should be 25 as well as offers hope to twenty-somethings that think they are never going to accomplish much.

 

It also explains the sincerity of the back-handed compliment us older guys sometimes shower on younger guys: "I like you. You remind me of myself when I was young and stupid."

 

As a 75 year old, I can relate to what it is saying about the human brain. One of the interesting things is that I believe it explains how we can live in a world where a very high IQ person can work for a "lower IQ" guy that has become a multimillionaire. IQ is but one measurement of brain function.And many of those functions drastically improve with age. Personally, I've experienced it.

 

Any way, I thought this was actually a very instructional, interesting, motivational and uplifting article about how we think.

 

Enjoy!

 

I subscribe to the theory that success is more a function of high EQ vs high IQ.

 

Folks with higher emotional intelligence tend to outperform/out earn folks with just high IQ.

 

 

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If we barred people under 25 from voting, wouldn’t we need to stop taxing them? “No taxation without representation.”

 

And if we were to argue that people under 25 are all too dumb to vote, then we could also argue that only people with certain grades or SAT scores or whatever should be allowed to vote, cuz otherwise they’re too dumb.

 

We could also point to trends in how neural factors (such as memory) tend to decrease in older age and thereby argue that there should be an age cap on voting.

 

With this (and more) in mind, the idea that we should raise the voting age seems ill-founded. (And it’s predicated on a misunderstanding of neural development.)

 

There's probably a good portion of folks 25 and under that paying net-zero taxes anyway.

 

 

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I'm 69 and I feel like I haven't done my best work yet. I know there is something out there.

 

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If we barred people under 25 from voting, wouldn’t we need to stop taxing them? “No taxation without representation.”

 

And if we were to argue that people under 25 are all too dumb to vote, then we could also argue that only people with certain grades or SAT scores or whatever should be allowed to vote, cuz otherwise they’re too dumb.

 

We could also point to trends in how neural factors (such as memory) tend to decrease in older age and thereby argue that there should be an age cap on voting.

 

With this (and more) in mind, the idea that we should raise the voting age seems ill-founded. (And it’s predicated on a misunderstanding of neural development.)

 

It's not about being dumb. It's about brain development. Some people are dumb with a fully developed brain, and others are genius at the age of 12 compared to an average adult. But it is the decision making capacity that needs to be fully developed before they can be trusted to make the right "decision" for their personal intelligence level. That is 25. Or we could give them the benefit of the doubt and make it 24. :)

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I did

 

 

 

What about older folks? Did you think you knew more than they did?

 

I thought I did. I was part of the hippie generation. We thought we were much more enlightened than all generations that preceded us. We ended up mucking it up the emost in the end. And we were just the first generation to really embrace that kind of stupid. The culture promotes it now - "it" being convincing people under the age of 25 that they are somehow superior to previous generations.

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Forget old men. What if old women were in charge? Heck, it doesn't have to be old women. Just put women of all ages in charge and the world would be better for it.

 

I think it would be considerably more violent. Men are stronger and, with that strength, comes the general ability to temper it. Women are quicker to lash out. Given strength (Guns, nuclear weapons, soldiers, etc.) they would be much more dangerous than men.

 

This is all a generalization and only my opinion, but based on my observations of men and women over many decades. There are plenty of women I've met that I thank God they don't have any power, and plenty of men that are big teddy bears. God granted men the ability to use that power judiciously, and I know what you are thinking - that men are pretty violent. And you would be right to a degree. My point is that if that power was given to women, they would be much quicker to pounce with that power. It is their greater reliance on emotion as well as their maternal instinct that I believe is behind that. As C. S. Lewis once said, if your child has wronged another child and you are going to the door of his home to apologize, which parent would you rather see open the door? Women have a "protect the family at all costs" maternal instinct. Men tend to be a little more reticent to use their power. This is why it is not unusual to find a women henpecking a man do "do something" about others wronging the family. The man, in a very real way is there to protect the over-protective woman from lashing out at the world when it harms or threatens her family.

 

This is all my opinion based on observations of human beings and my reading on the subject. Make of it what you will.

 

 

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I wonder how you would’ve felt in honors calc III with Sandy Grabiner. I entered college with a chip on shoulder. This class swiftly crushed it and sprinkled it away like the thinnest of Lay’s salty snacks. Oh the brutality!

 

No matter how good you are at a thing, there is always someone better. The hopes of many a high school star quarterback are dashed on the rocks of College competition.

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I subscribe to the theory that success is more a function of high EQ vs high IQ.

 

Folks with higher emotional intelligence tend to outperform/out earn folks with just high IQ.

 

 

You and I are in complete agreement on this. And I believe that those with that high EQ can get rich off the work of their high IQ employees. :)

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No matter how good you are at a thing, there is always someone better. The hopes of many a high school star quarterback are dashed on the rocks of College competition.

 

The corollary is also true.

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I think it would be considerably more violent. Men are stronger and, with that strength, comes the general ability to temper it. Women are quicker to lash out. Given strength (Guns, nuclear weapons, soldiers, etc.) they would be much more dangerous than men.

 

This is all a generalization and only my opinion, but based on my observations of men and women over many decades. There are plenty of women I've met that I thank God they don't have any power, and plenty of men that are big teddy bears. God granted men the ability to use that power judiciously, and I know what you are thinking - that men are pretty violent. And you would be right to a degree. My point is that if that power was given to women, they would be much quicker to pounce with that power. It is their greater reliance on emotion as well as their maternal instinct that I believe is behind that. As C. S. Lewis once said, if your child has wronged another child and you are going to the door of his home to apologize, which parent would you rather see open the door? Women have a "protect the family at all costs" maternal instinct. Men tend to be a little more reticent to use their power. This is why it is not unusual to find a women henpecking a man do "do something" about others wronging the family. The man, in a very real way is there to protect the over-protective woman from lashing out at the world when it harms or threatens her family.

 

This is all my opinion based on observations of human beings and my reading on the subject. Make of it what you will.

 

 

No matter how subjective you are there is always someone more subjective. :D

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I thought I did. I was part of the hippie generation. We thought we were much more enlightened than all generations that preceded us. We ended up mucking it up the emost in the end. And we were just the first generation to really embrace that kind of stupid. The culture promotes it now - "it" being convincing people under the age of 25 that they are somehow superior to previous generations.

 

So like I said. You and your generation thought you were smarter than everyone then. And, even though you now realize that was wrong, you still think you’re smarter than everyone now.

 

How do you know that you and your generation aren’t just continuing to make the same mistake?

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So like I said. You and your generation thought you were smarter than everyone then. And, even though you now realize that was wrong, you still think you’re smarter than everyone now.

 

How do you know that you and your generation aren’t just continuing to make the same mistake?

 

Nope. I was in that generation but never bought into it beyond the normal over-reaction to realizing I'm smarter than I was when I was twelve.

 

My point is that it was the first generation that was actually granted power to claim it as a given. There were not a lot of organized "student" protests in any civilized country before the 1960's. And no, it wasn't just because of the vietnam war. There have been a LOT of silly wars in history. There were no student protests in London when their boys went to the new world to die in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.

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Nope. I was in that generation but never bought into it beyond the normal over-reaction to realizing I'm smarter than I was when I was twelve.

 

My point is that it was the first generation that was actually granted power to claim it as a given. There were not a lot of organized "student" protests in any civilized country before the 1960's. And no, it wasn't just because of the vietnam war. There have been a LOT of silly wars in history. There were no student protests in London when their boys went to the new world to die in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.

 

England didn’t have the type of government or society in those days that allowed the common people to believe they had any such right or power to do so.

 

The US, OTOH, enshrined the right to petition the government for redress of grievances into our constitution.

 

They werent the first generation “granted” the power. The power is an inalienable right endowed upon all men by their creator. The inability for the government to suppress it was secured nearly 200 years earlier.

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England didn’t have the type of government or society in those days that allowed the common people to believe they had any such right or power to do so.

 

The US, OTOH, enshrined the right to petition the government for redress of grievances into our constitution.

 

They werent the first generation “granted” the power. The power is an inalienable right endowed upon all men by their creator. The inability for the government to suppress it was secured nearly 200 years earlier.

 

I mean they were granted the power by the prevailing culture, not the government. Young people became an economic force that really blossomed in the 60's. They were being listened to because they had money. It was even more significant of a phenomenon in the UK (which had been seriously set back by WWII) than in the US. There are books written and documentaries made about it.

 

However, the age of "teen and twenty-something" power is waning, IMO. The whole thing has come full circle with an apparent sense of entitlement growing in the younger generation. It makes them less productive. And I'm not sure mom and dad are going to just throw money at them at this time. But I could be wrong. We'll see how it plays out, and if they end up having to pay back their student loans.

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We have all of two posters under the age of 40 who post regularly that I know of for sure. And no women.

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We have all of two posters under the age of 40 who post regularly that I know of for sure. And no women.

 

Groovy!

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Have a look at this article, which takes a different view of the effect mentioned in the OP:

 

https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine...decline/590650

 

[ATTACH=JSON]{"data-align":"none","data-size":"full","data-attachmentid":32538042}[/ATTACH]

 

I read a few pages in, but will get back to it later. From what I've seen so far, though, it sounds like it is discussing the lamentations of a non-religious, humanist man that was highly successful coming to grips with reaching the point in his life where he no longer is. Actually, it kinda reminds me of the "Doc" character in the movie "Cars".

 

In my case, I see this life as a mist and a place where I'm really just "passing through". I enjoy it immensely and enjoy when I can help younger people out. But I am not surprised when many don't listen. I was young once and I remember it like it was yesterday. In fact, that is how I remember all the phases of my life.

 

But if your sense of worth is wrapped up in this world and your accomplishments, it would be hard not to be terribly depressed when you no longer have value - at least in the area that you always had value. And if this life is all you got, just hope you "Live fast, Love Hard, Die young and leave a beatutiful memory", because old age is gonna be very hard indeed.

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It's not about being dumb. It's about brain development. Some people are dumb with a fully developed brain, and others are genius at the age of 12 compared to an average adult. But it is the decision making capacity that needs to be fully developed before they can be trusted to make the right "decision" for their personal intelligence level. That is 25. Or we could give them the benefit of the doubt and make it 24. :)

 

This is painfully simplistic.

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No matter how good you are at a thing, there is always someone better. The hopes of many a high school star quarterback are dashed on the rocks of College competition.

 

This is absolutely true!

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