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Great production in the 80's

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I would go with 'Love Over Gold' instead of 'Brothers in Arms'.

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I would go with 'Love Over Gold' instead of 'Brothers in Arms'.

 

Same, and Communique over both.

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Posted (edited)

 

Same, and Communique over both.

 

Hmmm. I would disagree those albums had better production or mix. But even if you prefer them, you still have to agree the sound of this album is fantastic?

 

Not one of my favorite albums — and a couple of tracks are waaaay overplayed—but it is one I return to just because sounds so damn good.

Edited by Vito Corleone

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Posted (edited)
In another thread Anton said that He hated the production of almost all of the recordings made in the 1980's.

I want to present my case as one of the greatest production since "Dark Side of the Moon".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brothers_in_Arms_(album)

My favorite from that album.

 

The best thing I can say about it is that it isn't nearly as bad as some other 80s productions. Its still too bright and too wet, imho.

 

Here are some 80s productions that I do like. They have several common threads though, they're all early 80s, and have either Compass Point Studios, Eno and/or Rhett Davies in common.

 

Remain In Light

Gabriel IV

My Life In The Bush Of Ghosts

Avalon

 

And then there were:

 

PE - It Takes A Nation Of Millions

Eric B & Rakim: Paid In Full

Boogie Down Productions: Criminal Minded.

 

They also had a common thread - nothing in music had ever sounded like these records before.

 

 

edit: forgot Back in Black, which came out in 1980 and sounded awesome.

Edited by Red Ant
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Chuck Ainlay did an amazing surround remix of this album in 2005. De-80s-ed the mix just a bit as well This is one of the “demo” discs I use when I have friends over and want to impress them with why I think surround mixes can be so superior to 2-channel stereo.

 

If you have the setup/and or the opportunity, you should check it out.

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I vote for those few seconds on Graceland, yeknow, on “Call Me Al,” the bass fill that immediately plays back backwards.

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I also really like Lyle Lovett’s “Joshua Judges Ruth” for great sounding 80s

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Making Movies is my favorite Dire Straits album, sound wise and song wise.

 

Never liked Brothers in Arms; can't stand Money for Nothing or Walk of Life.

To me, it's the album where Knopfler abandoned his classic guitar sound and his tone became ordinary.

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Pat Metheny/Lyle Mays’ “As Falls Wichita, So Falls Wichita Falls” never fails to give me goosebumps.

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Pat Metheny/Lyle Mays’ “As Falls Wichita' date=' So Falls Wichita Falls” never fails to give me goosebumps. [/quote']

 

That really is a good one.

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Generally, I liked the "cleanness" but I hated the drum sounds.

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Making Movies is my favorite Dire Straits album, sound wise and song wise.

 

Never liked Brothers in Arms; can't stand Money for Nothing or Walk of Life.

To me, it's the album where Knopfler abandoned his classic guitar sound and his tone became ordinary.

 

I'm less bothered by the ordinariness of the tone than the ordinariness of the songwriting.

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Generally' date=' I liked the "cleanness" but I hated the drum sounds.[/quote']

 

Drum sounds, synth sounds, all the air sucked out of recording and replaced with "digital air" in a very obvious, unsubtle way... I hate all of it.

 

Fortunately by the 90s we all learned to use the new technology for good and not evil :lol:

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I still think Thriller is a great sounding album; great sounds, fat bass, good grooves, excellent songwriting, great guest artists (Van Halen, Paul McCartney, Vincent Price, Steve Lukather, Jeff Porcaro, Steve Porcaro, Greg Phillinganes, etc).

 

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I still think Thriller is a great sounding album; great sounds, fat bass, good grooves, excellent songwriting, great guest artists (Van Halen, Paul McCartney, Vincent Price, Steve Lukather, Jeff Porcaro, Steve Porcaro, Greg Phillinganes, etc).

 

It is, but listen to how much fuller, richer and warmer Off The Wall sounds in comparison.

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It is, but listen to how much fuller, richer and warmer Off The Wall sounds in comparison.

 

To what do you attribute this?

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To what do you attribute this?

 

New and poorly understood recording tools, changing public tastes and cocaine :lol:

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New and poorly understood recording tools, changing public tastes and cocaine :lol:

 

I'll have to give Off the Wall a listen. I've heard the hits off of that record a million times and I don't remember them sounding particularly special from an audible perspective. Thriller has a crispness and clarity that jumps out at me.

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I'll have to give Off the Wall a listen. I've heard the hits off of that record a million times and I don't remember them sounding particularly special from an audible perspective. Thriller has a crispness and clarity that jumps out at me.

 

[video=youtube;g8DOz4o7qJU]

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IMO it doesn't get much better than Nick Lowe's production on "Nick the Nnife".

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Posted (edited)
Invasion of Your Privacy!

 

Not a clue... had to look it up. And yep, every example of awful 80s production, prominently displayed - thin, overprocessed guitars with way too much verb, massively wet drums (and vocals), no low end to speak of, everything is super shiny and brittle :lol:

Edited by Red Ant
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Not a clue... had to look it up. And yep, every example of awful 80s production, prominently displayed - thin, overprocessed guitars with way too much verb, massively wet drums (and vocals), no low end to speak of, everything is super shiny and brittle :lol:

 

Hehe, I figured that would epitomize your eightiesphobia. :lol:

 

Still has one of the best opening guitar riffs ever though on "Lay it Down."

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Still has one of the best opening guitar riffs ever though on "Lay it Down."

 

Meh. Even for 80s hair metal, its mediocre... I had to pull up a youtube to ever remember what it sounded like. VH was still king of the memorable intro riff back then.

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Meh. Even for 80s hair metal, its mediocre... I had to pull up a youtube to ever remember what it sounded like. VH was still king of the memorable intro riff back then.

 

It took me years to figure that riff out exactly! :mad2: He takes a Police/Eddie Brickell chord and pushes the top two notes up a half step turning it into major triad with the 3rd in the bass. Pretty slick!

 

Of course you're right though, Eddie was the king.

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Posted (edited)

Stopped by a friend’s house for dinner and he has some music playing in the background and an Arif Mardin 80s production — Chaka Khan’s “Through the Fire”, which I probably haven’t heard since the 80s—comes on and I thought immediately of this thread. :lol:

 

gawdawful!

Edited by Vito Corleone
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Stopped by a friend’s house for dinner and he has some music playing in the background and an Arif Mardin 80s production — Chaka Khan’s “Through the Fire”, which I probably haven’t heard since the 80s—comes on and I thought immediately if this thread. :lol:

 

gawdawful!

 

:barf:

 

It's definitely no "You've Got the Love" or "Ain't Nobody."

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It took me years to figure that riff out exactly! :mad2: He takes a Police/Eddie Brickell chord and pushes the top two notes up a half step turning it into major triad with the 3rd in the bass. Pretty slick!

 

Of course you're right though, Eddie was the king.

 

Huh? He played a 1st inversion Maj triad??? With a little sus4 thrown in? Genius! :lol:

 

Seriously, whats so special about DMaj(sus4), BbMaj/D and Cmaj/D?

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Posted (edited)

 

:barf:

 

It's definitely no "You've Got the Love" or "Ain't Nobody."

 

True. But the fact is those production styles wouldn’t have worked in the 80s. And I certainly understood the need for updating sounds at the time and I don’t hate the 80s stuff as much as some people here. But that Arif Mardin thing? Wow. Made David Foster sound restrained and subtle. :lol:

 

Edited by Vito Corleone

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Huh? He played a 1st inversion Maj triad??? With a little sus4 thrown in? Genius! :lol:

 

Seriously, whats so special about DMaj(sus4), BbMaj/D and Cmaj/D?

 

Well as they say, you take what's good for your pleasin'

 

I'll take what's good for the crazy evening. :lol:

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True. But the fact is those production styles wouldn’t have worked in the 80s. And I certainly understood the need for updating sounds at the time and I don’t hate the 80s stuff as much as some people here. But that Arif Mardin thing? Wow. Made David Foster sound restrained and subtle. :lol:

 

Ain't Nobody was '83, but yeah.

 

In my mind there is the good 80s that includes Van Halen, hair bands up to and including Ratt, but not Poison, and of course it's the golden age of hip hop.

 

And then the bad '80s, which include synth pop bands (special exemptions for Human League, Soft Cell, Kajagoogoo and Duran Duran), Van Hagar, Madonna, etc.. And there was something about the '80s that completely tainted all the '70s prog rock bands. It was really uncanny how bands like Yes and Rush seemed to be like, "hey we tried being good, let's try sucking now! I bet our Album sales will double!" which of course they did. Not just prog bands actually. Billy Joel went from tunes like "The Stranger" to "Uptown Girl." What the hell happened? :lol:

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Ain't Nobody was '83, but yeah.

 

In my mind there is the good 80s that includes Van Halen, hair bands up to and including Ratt, but not Poison, and of course it's the golden age of hip hop.

 

And then the bad '80s, which include synth pop bands (special exemptions for Human League, Soft Cell, Kajagoogoo and Duran Duran), Van Hagar, Madonna, etc.. And there was something about the '80s that completely tainted all the '70s prog rock bands. It was really uncanny how bands like Yes and Rush seemed to be like, "hey we tried being good, let's try sucking now! I bet our Album sales will double!" which of course they did. Not just prog bands actually. Billy Joel went from tunes like "The Stranger" to "Uptown Girl." What the hell happened? :lol:

 

I love a lot of the 80s synth stuff. Tears for Fears. Simple Minds. Howard Jones. Some of that production is dated now, of course, but I loved it at the time. Fresh and groundbreaking and I was soooo “please don’t make hear another southern rock thing ever again!” at the time.

 

The prog bands? Well it was either go that route or go home. “Tormato”, anyone? Can I get a shout out for King Crimson’s “Discipline” though? Love that album and the production.

 

Billy gets a pass from me because I heard him say once that he came up with the idea of “Uptown Girl” while sitting at a table in a bar with Elle McPherson (who he was dating at the time), Christie Brinkley and Whitney Houston and he was like “WTF? How did I end up HERE?”

 

Sometimes it’s best to just roll with it. :)

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Posted (edited)

 

Can I get a shout out for King Crimson’s “Discipline” though? Love that album and the production.

 

 

I loved it when it came out, and I saw every tour from Discipline to Three of A Perfect Pair, but I find it nigh unlistenable now, whereas I can listen to Lark's Tongue, Starless and Red and never tire of it. 80s KC is just too cold and mathematical for me now, and the production and sounds have a great deal to do with it.

 

Here's one that does hold up for me still - a brilliant song is a brilliant song, and I think the production works beautifully.

 

[video=youtube;onCpEJDfyg0]

 

The Flat Earth is a brilliant album, and it still sounds incredible to me... all the glitz and polish of 80s production, but perfectly organic to the music and balanced with warmth, space and incredible stereo imaging.

 

Edited by Red Ant
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I love a lot of the 80s synth stuff. Tears for Fears. Simple Minds. Howard Jones. Some of that production is dated now, of course, but I loved it at the time. Fresh and groundbreaking and I was soooo “please don’t make hear another southern rock thing ever again!” at the time.

 

The prog bands? Well it was either go that route or go home. “Tormato”, anyone? Can I get a shout out for King Crimson’s “Discipline” though? Love that album and the production.

 

Billy gets a pass from me because I heard him say once that he came up with the idea of “Uptown Girl” while sitting at a table in a bar with Elle McPherson (who he was dating at the time), Christie Brinkley and Whitney Houston and he was like “WTF? How did I end up HERE?”

 

Sometimes it’s best to just roll with it. :)

 

:D

Don't kill the whale, bro!

 

Still take that over Big Generator any day.

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Re: Van Halen.

 

Ive never been a big fan of what Ted Templeman and Donn Landee did with drums sounds. Either with the Doobie Brothers or with Van Halen.

 

But “Fair Warning” f’n rocks!

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Re: Van Halen.

 

Ive never been a big fan of what Ted Templeman and Donn Landee did with drums sounds. Either with the Doobie Brothers or with Van Halen.

 

But “Fair Warning” f’n rocks!

 

Right down to the album cover painted by violent mental patients! :rawk:

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I loved it when it came out, and I saw every tour from Discipline to Three of A Perfect Pair, but I find it nigh unlistenable now, whereas I can listen to Lark's Tongue, Starless and Red and never tire of it. 80s KC is just too cold and mathematical for me now, and the production and sounds have a great deal to do with it.

 

Here's one that does hold up for me still - a brilliant song is a brilliant song, and I think the production works beautifully.

 

[video=youtube;onCpEJDfyg0]

 

The Flat Earth is a brilliant album, and it still sounds incredible to me... all the glitz and polish of 80s production, but perfectly organic to the music and balanced with warmth, space and incredible stereo imaging.

 

Excellent album no doubt.

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Also Trevor Horn was amazing. I don't like everything he's done, but Frankie's "Relax" and Grace Jones' "Slave To The Rhythm" were masterful, production wise - very 80s, but I can still listen to either and appreciate the craftsmanship, and the HUGE sounding mixes.

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Also Trevor Horn was amazing. I don't like everything he's done' date=' but Frankie's "Relax" and Grace Jones' "Slave To The Rhythm" were masterful, production wise - very 80s, but I can still listen to either and appreciate the craftsmanship, and the HUGE sounding mixes. [/quote']

 

I did love me some "Relax." And Falco!

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I did love me some "Relax." And Falco!

 

And coming back around to the prog thing, “Owner of a Lonely Heart” blew my mind first time I heard it.

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Ah yes, the duo that ruined R&B :lol:

 

angry02

 

But I'll forgive you, since I was just about to post Slave to the Rhythm. :)

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And coming back around to the prog thing, “Owner of a Lonely Heart” blew my mind first time I heard it.

 

Really? It was ok, but I never thought that record lived up to their '70s stuff, most of it anyway. I was kind of a Steve Howe loyalist though. I do remember the issue of Guitar that was transcribed in.

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Of course, Ozric Tentacles started out in the 80s, and I love the sh*t out of ANYTHING Ozric Tentacles :lol:

 

[video=youtube;4f52hgmPAbw]

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Of course, Ozric Tentacles started out in the 80s, and I love the sh*t out of ANYTHING Ozric Tentacles :lol:

 

[video=youtube;4f52hgmPAbw]

 

That was completely off my radar, but with a little editing it would have made a great soundtrack for an '80s training montage. :lol:

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Really? It was ok, but I never thought that record lived up to their '70s stuff, most of it anyway. I was kind of a Steve Howe loyalist though. I do remember the issue of Guitar that was transcribed in.

 

I never bothered to compare it to their earlier stuff, of which I was never much of a fan of anyway.

 

It sounded like nothing I had ever heard before. First time I had ever heard samples used like that.

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Really? It was ok, but I never thought that record lived up to their '70s stuff, most of it anyway. I was kind of a Steve Howe loyalist though. I do remember the issue of Guitar that was transcribed in.

 

I never liked any Yes, tbh, and thought *at the time* it was better than anything they'd done since Bruford left, but for me it REALLY does not hold up today. Its more like Trevor Horn's shark-jumping moment :lol:

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