Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Bob Dey

Advertise your gigs on facebook

Recommended Posts

This year is beginning to look pretty good for our duo. Just had a gig this last Friday and turnout wasn't good because we didn't do much to advertise on facebook. We have two more gigs lined up in April and one in May so I'll have to do more to get the word out.

 

In contrast, the band I play with did a gig last month for the door ($10 cover) and advertised an awful lot on facebook. They ended up bringing in $600 for the night. The ads were done in a graphic arts sort of way rather than just text.

 

140ed033b0d700e55e79535df9140d87.thumb.png.11f24dc48cf71ae7d21d52aa52d6f706.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't do facebook. But we worked this week Sunday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday, and we have a gig tonight. Same next week, only Monday and Thursday off. Different gig every night. Friday and Saturday we did two beachfront highrise condominiums one on Friday, and it's next door neighbor on Saturday.

 

I send out a e-newsletter and have a web page. The newsletter is opt-in and I send over 500 out weekly. I also advertise on Craigslist and a local 'Treasure Coast Events" site.

 

The problem with facebook is that it's exclusive, you have to be on facebook to see the ad. Not everybody does FB. Anyone can see my webpage and my ads, whether or not they are on facebook.

 

The very young and the very old are not on facebook in big numbers. Plus your ad might be down 20 pages on someone's news feed. And my market is 55+ years of age. I've worked that market since 1985 and it's the most profitable in my area.

 

I tried facebook, it didn't make a difference, all it did was fill my inbox with spam and advertise to the world when I wasn't going to be home. But then, when I gig I have everything of value with me so I guess that doesn't really matter.

 

Of course, if it works for you in your market, I think that's great. There is definitely more than one right way to do this.

 

On a lighter note:

 

ODE TO FACEBOOK

 

Oh Facebook how are you today?

I visit you most every day

 

And everything I do or say

you put into my dossier

 

Where was I born? what was my school?

Enter your job, be very cool

 

You even know my family

and everything that's dear to me

 

My information's gold to you

it sells to stores and spammers too

 

If I click "like" or I repost

your clients will dig me the most

 

I click an ad merely to look?

the ad man pulls to set the hook

 

It'll be in my e-mail today

and web page ads, day after day

 

And It'll waste, my precious time

and you'll receive another dime

 

I wouldn't mind the money you make

if a commission I could take

 

I'd like to get twenty percent

but you don't offer one red cent

 

So Facebook please let's make a deal

just cut me in, no need to steal

 

I'll finish my profile if you do

and we will profit, both me and you

 

© Bob Norton (as if anyone would

want to steal this )

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

My experience with facebook is that it's a great place to collect "interested" and "going" clicks but when the time comes, they're still glued to their screen clicking on "interested" and "going" for the next week's entertainment.

Edited by pogo97

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am playing a small new bar this Wednesday and used a Facebook messenger to notify a few people, it will probably result in half a dozen or so coming. So it works for me, if I really went for it by advertising on relative Facebook groups experience says considerably more would come. But I will leave that to the bar to do via their Facebook group.

When I visited the venue a few nights ago I was talking to the owner/manager and was overheard by a table of ladies, one or two had seen me before, who immediately booked a car service (this bar picks people up and takes them home) and also got on their phones to ask friends if they wanted to attend.

So all this combined with the bars advertising should get to the 60 or so capacity, not bad for a Wednesday in early April.

Here Facebook works.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A lot of venues . . . .

. . . promote your gig on FB a night or two before.

. . . have past dates posted on their "events" page, but few if any upcoming gigs.

. . . promote weekend band dates, but not solos and duos during the week.

. . . expect you to tell your friends, which is fine, except most of my friends don't live anywhere near the venue - an hour's drive or a day's drive - but nearly all the folks that "like" your venue live close by.

 

I don't understand . . .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
A lot of venues . . . .

. . . promote your gig on FB a night or two before.

. . . have past dates posted on their "events" page, but few if any upcoming gigs.

. . . promote weekend band dates, but not solos and duos during the week.

. . . expect you to tell your friends, which is fine, except most of my friends don't live anywhere near the venue - an hour's drive or a day's drive - but nearly all the folks that "like" your venue live close by.

 

I don't understand . . .

 

you need to make local friends, senor... :wave:

 

But I agree that many venues are lazy and only update their websites and FB pages for the weekend acts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My experience with Facebook is that it's a great place to collect "interested" and "going" clicks but when the time comes' date=' they're still glued to their screen clicking on "interested" and "going" for the next week's entertainment.[/quote']

 

That's my experience as well, but for some people, FB really works. However, these folks post plenty of cute pictures of their pets, dinners, walks, and vacations, and also post about sports teams, and thoughts and advice that cross all philosophical and political platforms.. People come to view them as friends and consequently will get off their couch and actually go see them. But the promo doesn't stop there.Once at the gig, the successful FB promoters work the room, saying hi, shaking hands, complimenting woman's hair cuts.... the list is endless and has nothing to do with music. Even though I'm more of an extrovert than an introvert, the "how's the wife and kids" angle exhausts me, and at times makes me cranky.

 

Promo seems to be all that matters these days. I mean there are fast food restaurants that serve inedible food, but serve millions of people a year, through massive advertising - coupled with massive amounts of salt and sugar too I guess. Deep sigh...

 

I'll keep using FB though, just to remind folks I'm still out there. I also get a couple of gig offers a year through FB messenger, so it's a necessary tool for me.

 

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Shaster's right. It's not enough to be a good musician with a good act. If they don't like you as a person you won't be as successful as you could be. And a friendly fan might feel slighted if the entertainer doesn't talk to them during breaks.

 

I'm not extroverted, but I've managed to build up a following on facebook. Sometimes a personal invite to a gig will get them out rather than a general announcement. But then again, you have to pretty much have a PR type personality - which I don't!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I have been using FB for about 8 years to promote gigs. And what I have noticed is this: I get almost no one because of FB. I have also noticed that everyone is spamming FB with their gigs, and not just musicians, but artiosts, service providers, and so on. My millennial kids a have largely abandonded FB for Instagram and complain that FB has become a cross between a Senior Citizens political forum and a strip mall for middle aged folks and seniors. Most Millennials I've experienced don't care to discuss politics. When I started filtering out the political content on my feed, I'm left with little more than other musicians spamming gigs and pics of people's cats and lunch.

 

Bottom linel I seem to get the same turnout whether I advertise it or not. Of course most of my gigs are either in nicer restaurants where the guy with the guitar over in the corner isn't the main draw, or they are ale houses with a built in regular crowd.

Edited by Pat'sStrat
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After the facebook ads didn't make any difference, I started thinking about FB and eventually decided to quit FB and delete all my data.

 

Why?

 

1) FB took the clicks and likes of their members and sent them fraudulent news to influence a presidential election (it's not fake news, but out and out fraud - let's not minimize that). Now I don't care if it is for the candidate I voted for or the opponent, it's cheating, it's un-American, it should be illegal, and IMHO Z and his board of directors should be jailed for fraud and treason.

 

2) Since I have my own domain I registered using an e-mail address I created that consisted of a long string of pseudo-random letters and numbers @ my domain. I used a password manager to create it and it was long enough and random enough for security by obscurity. I used the address only once to register and confirm my FB account. In a month or so I was getting spam mails, some of which seemed to definitely phishing attempts. FB selling my info to phishing hackers? That's not a good way to make profits.

 

3) Z was hired to create FB and he stole it from the people who hired him, lost the lawsuit and had to pay them $9 million - he is not a nice guy.

 

I cannot justify FB making money from my personal information if they are going to use it for anti-democratic and phishing profits.

 

But that is just me. IMHO the ends were not enough to justify the means.

 

I do a lot of promo. My weekly newsletter is up around 500 people, and I include a lame joke that insures they read it. I know because they comment on the jokes. Sometimes the bad puns get more comments than the truly funny jokes I don't suppose I could get 500 facebook friends to read my post every week.

 

Others just visit my web page, I made it easy to get to http://www.s-cats.com without typos. I keep a calendar of 'in public' events there, and I do not post private, corporate, yacht/country club, condominium, or retirement development gigs.

 

I don't schmooze much though, but talk to people from the stage. If they request a song, I remember and next time send it out to them without them having to ask. We play with people on the mic, if the gig is appropriate for that (some gigs we just play music for dancing - it depends)

 

I try to make the act as entertaining as possible by celebrating whatever holiday happens to be found on the web. Yesterday was "Name Yourself Day" so we had "Hello My Name Is" stickers, so that everyone who wanted to could rename themselves for a day, put it on the sticker, and was called that name all day. And almost everybody wanted a sticker. I also gave names to the song artists like calling Jimmy Buffett, Sunday Buffett, or anything I could think of at the spur of the moment. Elvis Johnson? Sonny Winter? We also send out favorite songs to people we knew, but used their today name (even if we had to ask).

 

We have a great time on stage, we look like we are having tons of fun, and we share that with our audience.

 

We tell them how much we like them, and that they are more of an extended family than an audience. And we mean it.

 

If they hang out after the gig, and some often do, we talk with them like friends, share their accomplishments and soothe their sadness if appropriate.

 

We've been playing for some French Canadians at an RV park all winter, and one of our extended family members left us with their address and phone number, inviting us to their home if we wanted to go to Montreal for a vacation. They told us they would be honored, we said we would be more than honored to say, but we are planning on Paris to Venice this year, They said they will be back next winter and the invitation will always be open.

 

I had another apologize by e-mail that he couldn't make the gig yesterday because his wife fell and broke her wrist. I of course wished her a speedy and complete recovery.

 

I don't think FB will ever get this personal because the audience is too broad.

 

So if FB works for you, great. I don't want anything to do with it.

 

Insights and incites by Notes

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Notes...I NEVER signed up to FB, after teh MiceSpace collapse, I was wary...and leary...and suspicious...

I believe, in the final analysis, I was right not to jump on board.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Notes...I NEVER signed up to FB, after teh MiceSpace collapse, I was wary...and leary...and suspicious...

I believe, in the final analysis, I was right not to jump on board.

 

I jumped on because of distant family. But I found the communications mostly one-sided anyway. Look at what I had for dinner last night -- here is a picture of me in front of ______ -- here is a picture of my children -- or whatever with some general "attaboy" or "attagirl" comments after that.

 

Spamming out your vacation pictures to a hundred or so people to me is not personal communication. If you want to share pictures with me, invite me over, or send me an e-mail. If your son gets a boy scout merit badge, send an e-mail and I'll send a personal congratulations.

 

Then I was told it would be a good place to promote my band. On the gig, when I told people I was on Facebook, at least a third snapped back "I don't do facebook" or something like that with a snarl. In the end it didn't make any difference.

 

What did make a difference was an article in a local tourist magazine "Best of 2019" edition. http://www.nortonmusic.com/pix/IndianRiverMag.pdf

 

And after finding out that FB was using fraud to manipulate a US Election, undermining what's left of the democratic process of the USA by utilizing fraud, I couldn't justify these people making one penny profit off my information. It would make me an accessory to fraud. I'm too much a patriot to be any part of that.

 

Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

The FB dinner posts are quite amusing, as are all the other mundane posts, like "cleaning my kitchen, or mowing my grass" entries. Do I care, apparently many people figure I do. Oh well.

 

In my area, a lot of useful and sometimes critical posts about music, gigs, musician's health, issues with club owners and so on are only shared on FB. As well, my agency posts on FB if they need a specialty act or have a last minute cancellation they can't fill. Some clubs here won't even hire you if you don't have a substantial FB presence. I've also heard of people approaching a promoter, only to have the promoter say, well let's see how many likes you get on your next gig promo - if you get over a hundred, I'll consider working with you. Like I said, I get direct gig offers a few times a year. Got one a week or two ago. Nice gig, early hours, twenty minutes from home, I couldn't do it, but it was a good offer - and only on FB.

 

I understand and applaud taking the moral high ground, but I guess I'll have to build my good karma some other way.

Edited by Shaster
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

there were people at the charleston sc gig from miami, atlanta, asheville, and wash dc from seeing facebook promotions for my gong meditations. i was shocked at how many people confessed travel plans and ticket purchases based upon my fb announcements.

further,all the permaculture events ive attended are fb connected heavily... its a good tool if used to your advantage... we network plant sales, community action, regional and national events, and get participants from around the world. of course in the water protector community it can be used for initial contact, but electronic communication is never secure and should be treated as such...

if pet pics and food, selfies, shallow poasting trip your trigger, mute... block... ignore... or monitor for possible personal growth. its a tool and a time wasting trap... your choice.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

"Gong meditations"

 

Of ourse when youlre offering something no one else is dojng, yiou will get a better turnout form social media. Yours is a performance that is of specific interest. Which sounds really cool, by the way. Here's a local guy who plays the handpan. He gets a good turnout because he's so different.

 

 

Unfortumatey where I live, there is a relativelynrecent disturbing trend. That is, every swinging schlong that was in a cover band got an acoustic guitar and they're out flooding the solo market playing their 80s classic rock acoustically instead of electrically. Every day on facebook I see a few new ones, guys who stand there with a music stand and a giant notebook playing like they're sawing logs. There are so many of them now that everybody is joining in. One of my daughter's friends played for fun in her living room ended up divorced, left her small kids with her husband and decided at 30 to pursue a creer as a soloist. She can't play, barely can sing, and is good for about an hour;s worth of material, while she repeats at least once. But because she's cute and has a tight bod, she gets booked at casinos and nicer venuesand because her friends follow her around they think shes good. The casino gig was three hours, so she brought her dad to play with her and perform some songs of his own, and he was not as good as she was. And now gaggles of them have descended on paying wineries an sports bars and started "open jams" wherein all these guys get up and play a 4 or 5 song set for free. These guys get a stage, the venue gets free music and the pros get shut out. Fortunately, I have a decent reputation and a steady cleintele, but I feel for the truly talented kids coming up that have to slug it out against mediocrity giving it away for free. Which is why when I see talented kids, I want to help them get ahead.

 

 

Edited by Pat'sStrat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Unfortumatey where I live, there is a relativelynrecent disturbing trend. … And now gaggles of them have descended on paying wineries an sports bars and started "open jams" wherein all these guys get up and play a 4 or 5 song set for free.

 

Not sure how recent that is. It was going pretty strong when I arrived here fifteen years ago. Then some of them who have sales skills, start organising things like "songwriters evenings" like you say. Maybe one in twenty have done the woodshedding to be interesting. Some are engaging and some are cute etc etc but very few are *musicians.* And that gets up my nose.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

 

Not sure how recent that is. It was going pretty strong when I arrived here fifteen years ago. Then some of them who have sales skills, start organising things like "songwriters evenings" like you say. Maybe one in twenty have done the woodshedding to be interesting. Some are engaging and some are cute etc etc but very few are *musicians.* And that gets up my nose.

 

The solo thing is a recent development here, about the last two or three years. There just aren't many band venues left. When I started doing a solo in 2005, there was maybe 10 of us local guys doing it. We were all turning down gigs because the venues that hired solos were mostly upscale (which around here is a restauant with no TVs) and there just weren't that many accomplished solo guys out there. I didn't even plan to do it, but a restaurant owner friend of mine asked me to put together a solo set and come in on a Wednesday night, so I did, and that was that, I've been at it ever since and now it is my main gig. At first it wasn't, so I took my time to select the songs I like and that I could pull off. It took a few years to develop a solid 200-300 songs and develop a direcrtion, and figure out what worked and didn't Anyway, the market stayed this way for pretty much 10 years, and then in about 2015-16, I noticed all these cover band guys showing up at acoustic venues. And now I have gone from 8-16 gigs a month all the way down to 4-8, or half. Some of the venues used to play donl;t even call me anymore because they have a crowd of jammers showing up who will play for free, and they don't want to insult me by asking me to take a pay cut to compete. They don't realize they already insulted me and everyone else who takes pride in their craft by doing what they're doing.

 

 

I can't say I blame them. But it's just a bummer that the market is becoming so saturated with mediocrity that I fear they'll kill the entire scene. If I see one more Facebook cellphone video from a wine bar of "Knocking on Heaven's Door" or "Every Rose Has its Thorns," I may shoot myself in the face.

 

By the way the same thing happened with the blues scene that exploded in the 90s. Every cover band guy jumped on the blues band bandwagon, which for them was a steady diet of SRV, Kenny Wayne Shepherd, Gary Moore, Hendrix, and pretty much anything that sounded like Van Halen playing a 1-4-5. And the same thing happened. It devolved into a gaggle of open blues jams instead of gigs. I guess that's the nature of the beast.

Edited by Pat'sStrat
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's a couple of more open mic night venues in my town too. They get 10-12 people that come in and do a few songs for free. Some are musicians in my age group (baby boomer) that played in bands back in the day. And I've even seen where one guy played open mic night that has been gigging for decades. This rubs me the wrong way but there's nothing I can do other than not patronizing those venues.

 

Even before those places opened there were several places in town that brought in free musicians with a tip jar. That leaves quite a few venues that I won't pursue for gigs. We've got two hotel lounge gigs that pay a normal amount. But for hotels, live music is kind of another amenity for hotel guests and making a profit every night isn't always necessary.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I'm quite fortunate in that my duo gig with my wife has a built in following, something I've never before experienced in all my years of playing in bands. My wife's cousin is the de facto leader of a loosely formed bicycle riding group. They're a great bunch of people who've become good friends and they love to go out, eat and party almost constantly. When we did our first gig back in February I don't think the wine bar venue expected much but they were quickly overwhelmed. The waitresses were getting stressed out because they couldn't get through the crowd to deliver food and beverage and then at 10pm when we were done the place became a ghost town. There were also a lot of faces we didn't recognize there all night as well, the bicycle group isn't big enough to totally stuff a place but I do think their level of enthusiasm is contagious.

 

Where FB comes in is that most of our friends/followers are on there and it makes it real convenient for us to get our gig dates out to them plus it gets picked up and shared by others while venues are also good at promoting there. It's been helpful in getting us some more gigs since it continues to be a primary pop culture phenomenon, our act is "new" and pretty much anyone who's into social activities or operating a social type of business is there.

 

Having said all that however, we've still done some phone tag and pavement pounding and these venues are also smart enough to know they need to advertise on more conventional or old fashioned outlets as well. There is a lot of competition in this area and I'm sure getting gigs will always be a challenge.

Edited by ggm1960

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My duo has also developed a following. We've been doing the "over 40" market since 1985. We've had a weekday lunch gig for 11 years, new owners came in, and we are the only band that stayed. The first week they took over, people were leaving because there were no open chairs left.

 

It's our one "in public" gig and where we invite people to see us for the one-nigher non-commercial gigs.

 

We have yacht clubs, country clubs retirement communities, RV parks, and condominiums that hire us regularly. Some give us 1 to 3 gigs per year, others one or two per month, so we end up working a lot in 'the season' and not so much in the 'off season'. Pretty much how it has been since we got established in the late 1980s. The difference is we can't charge more than we did 10 years go because of the increased competition.

 

The competition is coming from karaoke jocks who pretend to be bands and undercut everybody, and other duos displaced by the venues that don't hire bands anymore.

 

We have an open mic night almost every night of the week and one club or another, including weekends. This is where amateurs play for a beer and put professionals out of work. The owner gets paid, the manager gets paid, the bartenders get paid, the cooks get paid, the wait staff gets paid, the floor sweepers get paid, the toilet scrubbers get paid, and the musicians work for free. Have they no self respect? Don't they know they are telling the club owner they are worth less than the person who scrubs to toilets?

 

I'm glad I grew up when I did. When I was a young musician, every singles club and every hotel from a Holiday Inn on up had a live band of 4 pieces or more playing at least 6 nights per week. It was easy to get gigs, and as you honed your craft, you went for the better paying venues. Recorded music was considered el-cheapo and the only bars with TV screens were small, neighborhood taverns with a dozen or so bar stools.

 

Things change, times change, and good, live music is not as important to people anymore. We have sports bars, DJ clubs, karaoke nights, comedy nights, open mic nights, and other kinds of entertainment where bands used to be king.

 

But the biggest problem is TV.

 

TV you say?

 

In my parents generation TV was 3 channels maximum, black & white (monochrome), small, grainy and with tinny sound. Later came more channels, color (with a max of about 25 grainy inches diagonal with a vertical resolution of 525 lines) and a narrow audio bandwidth so no matter how big your amp and/or speakers were, the sound was still tinny. In other words, if you wanted to watch and hear good sounding music, you had to go out to a live band venue to do so.

 

Now we have >60" super hi resolution screens, 7.1 surround sound and a zillion channels. With 'on demand' you can have the Rolling Stones, Lady Gaga, Brad Paisley, or just about anyone else having a concert in your living room with better seats than you can afford at the local stadium or convention hall. Add a cable TV bill that can easily top $300 per month, and there goes the entertainment budget. You don't have to and can't afford to go out to hear live music.

 

I have no idea how to get people away from their TV sets and back in the bars where they belong ;)

 

Me? I turned the TV off in 1989, I've never seen Cheers, Taxi, Simsons, Sopranos, Thrones, Abbey, Idol, Seinfeld, D.Housewives, Sex/City, Dance/Stars and so many other shows I hear about, and so many others I don't hear about. And my life is better for it as I would rather live my life by doing things than to live my life vicariously by watching actors pretending to do things.

 

Fortunately I went into the one-nighter business in the late 1980s and built up a steady clientele so I'm still gigging, but what about the young musicians??? I guess they need a day job (aaaarrrrrrgggggghhhhhh).

 

I saw the writing on the wall for clubs as they started cutting 6 nights to 4 nights during the MADD Mothers campaign. Living in 'retirement haven' Florida, I took to what I figured would be the best market. When I started the retirees wanted Glenn Miller, Artie Shaw, Benny Goodman and the like, as time went on, they passed away and the Sinatra generation moved in, followed by the Elvis fans, then the Beatles, Disco, Clapton, and now they sing along to 60s, 70s and 80s music.

 

I make a living doing music and nothing but music, and that's what I like. I'm 'living the dream'' I guess. I wish there were more places for the young folks to play.

 

Notes

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Notes, I wish there were more places for old folks like us to play ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Notes' date=' I wish there were more places for old folks like us to play ;)[/quote']

 

Indeed! OTOH there are still some places to play, specifically retirement homes. My mother lives in one, and they have a steady stream of mostly mediocre (I'm being kind) performers coming through. Some are choirs and community bands, but many are solo performers. Going rate in my area is $75 to $100 to play an hour of Beatles, Elvis, maybe some Folk music and a few Swing tunes. They also have music in Palliative Care facilities. I know a few pros that do this circuit and it supplements their "real gigs". In many cases, their "real gigs" supplement their care home gigs. I haven't gone that route yet, but who knows, maybe in a few years I might try it.

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Notes' date=' I wish there were more places for old folks like us to play ;)[/quote']

 

We do a lot of yacht clubs, country clubs, retirement communities, RV resorts, mobile home parks, condominiums, and we've had an 11 year and running once a week weekday lunchtime gig.

 

I suppose where you are located determines if you have these opportunities or not. Florida is a big retirement haven and there are plenty of winter residents (snowbirds) that live here in the winter.

 

There are literally over a hundred retirement communities within an hours drive from us. Some huge ones with scores of buildings and some small ones. There is also a lot of competition, but we are definitely holding our own and gigging as much or more than the rest. But we've been doing retirement communities since the residents were fans of Glenn Miller. The music has changed through the years but the good customers still keep hiring us.

 

The Canadians seem to prefer RV and Mobile Home parks. I never asked but assume they can't buy property in the US and keep all their Canadian benefits, so they can buy a trailer and put it on a rented lot and still have a Florida home for up to 6 months. BTW, the French Canadians are a great audience.

 

We used to do the 'animal clubs' (Elks, Moose, etc.) a lot, but these institutions are fading into oblivion now. Failing membership, low attendance, and they have taken to hiring singers with karaoke tracks who will play for next to nothing. We won't leave the house for that kind of money, and fortunately have enough gigs so we can turn them down.

 

Just livin' the dream :D

 

Notes

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Indeed! OTOH there are still some places to play, specifically retirement homes. My mother lives in one, and they have a steady stream of mostly mediocre (I'm being kind) performers coming through. Some are choirs and community bands, but many are solo performers. Going rate in my area is $75 to $100 to play an hour of Beatles, Elvis, maybe some Folk music and a few Swing tunes. They also have music in Palliative Care facilities. I know a few pros that do this circuit and it supplements their "real gigs". In many cases, their "real gigs" supplement their care home gigs. I haven't gone that route yet, but who knows, maybe in a few years I might try it.

 

 

I've been building up the retirement home gigs for about 3 years and it's been a good source of income. As Shaster implied, they hardly ever have entertainment at my level. And I play songs that they know.

 

As for my "real gig" with my duo, FB didn't pan out for our gig on Friday. Quite a few folks clicked on "interested" but only two showed up. Good thing some guests at the hotel did show up. It was pretty much the first nice Spring day and I'd guess many folks decided to stoke up the grill and barbecue instead of going out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I've been building up the retirement home gigs for about 3 years and it's been a good source of income. <..>.

 

Plus the hours are good, there is always an audience (no Thursday nights with one salesman with his eyes on the TV), no fistfights, and at the end of the night they thank you for providing them a lovely evening.

 

Notes

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...