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Phil O'Keefe

Best three album run?

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I guess it's arguably a compilation and not an album? Half is music for the film, half is a collection of singles.

 

True, and in some places it was only released as an EP.

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Good choice, but wasn't Magical Mystery Tour in there before the White album?

 

I went off of UK albums, which most fans consider to be the definitive releases. MMT was released as a double EP in the UK originally - it wasn't until it was re-released on CD in 1987 that it came out in the UK as an album - in a strange reversal, it's really the only "American" Beatles release that's now considered the definitive version.

 

But still... it's a good observation and a valid point for debate. :)

 

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Posted (edited)
Bringing it all Back Home

Highway 61

Blonde on Blonde

 

I know that a lot of out and out musos hate the guy, but he was literally on fire through this period.

 

Guilty. Not just the guy, but the whole genre, with some few notable exceptions, David Bromberg being the most exceptional :D

 

[video=youtube;V2CwkDm1tE0]

 

 

Edited by Red Ant
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Bringing it all Back Home

Highway 61

Blonde on Blonde

 

I know that a lot of out and out musos hate the guy, but he was literally on fire through this period.

 

I love the morphing of goofing around (hows bout that mike adjuster ?? )

 

to playing as cold blooded as jimmy rogers in half a heart beat !! )

 

[video=youtube;OeP4FFr88SQ]

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Starless and Bible Black

Red

USA

- King Crimson

 

I went with Lark's Tongue 1st and left off USA, cause its a live record - and awfully recorded and terrible sounding to boot.

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S/t

Rated R

SftD

 

They hit paydirt with those 3. Seminal albums in an admittedly fairly limited genre, that I don't even listen to anymore 😂

 

After much QotSA listening, I like the first (s/t) the best.

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I went with Lark's Tongue 1st and left off USA, cause its a live record - and awfully recorded and terrible sounding to boot.

 

Let's compromise and make it a four-album run. It's just so great to hear Bruford/Wetton play live, even if the sound qulaity is suspect. I just read that Fripp compared their playing to "a flying brick wall."

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Let's compromise and make it a four-album run. It's just so great to hear Bruford/Wetton play live, even if the sound qulaity is suspect. I just read that Fripp compared their playing to "a flying brick wall."

 

A flying brick wall is right! There's video of the Central Park concert on YouTube - again, the quality is atrocious, but the playing is out of this world.

 

I've seen the Bruford/Levin combo numerous times for the Discipline/Beat tours, and it was great in its own way, but Bruford/Wetton remains my favorite.

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I went off of UK albums, which most fans consider to be the definitive releases. MMT was released as a double EP in the UK originally - it wasn't until it was re-released on CD in 1987 that it came out in the UK as an album - in a strange reversal, it's really the only "American" Beatles release that's now considered the definitive version.

 

But still... it's a good observation and a valid point for debate. :)

 

I'm fairly sure I bought my copy of MMT in the early '80s on vinyl in the UK on Parlophone. Probably an import, but I never noticed if it was.

 

You're correct that it wasn't released in 1967 in the UK as an LP, though.

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After much QotSA listening, I like the first (s/t) the best.

 

After having been a YOOOGE Kyuss fan in my teenage stoner years, I found s/t really not my thing at first, until I happened to try it out on my MD Walkman in a hotel in Penang on a backpacker trip in 2001 or so. I {censored}ing wore that album out on that trip and QotSA became the soundtrack to my life for a few years after that.

 

It was like ya, we're partying, we're taking drugs, we're {censored}ing ROCKING, and it's the complete opposite of ACDC, because we are {censored}ing INTELLIGENT woke mother{censored}ers.

 

These days?

 

Meh

 

:lol:

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I don't know if this counts but...

 

The Gist Of The Gemini - Gino Vanelli

Long Misty Days - Robin Trower

Hideaway - America

Wired - Jeff Beck

 

... are all albums, released in 1976, that Geoff Emerick was somehow involved in recording

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I don't know if this counts but...

 

The Gist Of The Gemini - Gino Vanelli

Long Misty Days - Robin Trower

Hideaway - America

Wired - Jeff Beck

 

... are all albums, released in 1976, that Geoff Emerick was somehow involved in recording

 

Hmmmm..... not sure I would have picked any of those as top examples for the artist, except maybe Wired.

 

Brother to Brother?

Bridge of Sighs?

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Hmmmm..... not sure I would have picked any of those as top examples for the artist, except maybe Wired.

 

Brother to Brother?

Bridge of Sighs?

 

My comment wasn't about the artist but about the recording engineer - the same guy who recorded Revolver, Sgt Pepper and bits of Rubber Soul and The White Album

 

Geoff Emerick recorded "Bridge of Sighs" as well but I just pick three consecutive albums for the sake of the thread

 

I noticed that many of the albums that had significant impact on me, especially as a guitarist, were recorded by Mr Emerick. Maybe it was the sound of the recorded guitar that was the draw.

 

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Posted (edited)

 

My comment wasn't about the artist but about the recording engineer - the same guy who recorded Revolver, Sgt Pepper and bits of Rubber Soul and The White Album

 

Geoff Emerick recorded "Bridge of Sighs" as well but I just pick three consecutive albums for the sake of the thread

 

I noticed that many of the albums that had significant impact on me, especially as a guitarist, were recorded by Mr Emerick. Maybe it was the sound of the recorded guitar that was the draw.

 

Mine also, particularly early in life. But with the benefit of hindsight and broader listening, I have to say The Beatles in particular had a whole lot of gawdawful guitar tones going on. Of course its nigh impossible to separate the guitar tone from iconic recordings which are indelibly burned into our brains, but if I were to attempt objectivity, I'd say that there are a whole lot of failed experiments there, tonally. Lots of thin, abrasive, spiky unpleasantness. Again, it all WORKS - whether because of the artistry of the creators involved, or because so many of us imbibed this music with mother's milk, so to speak, and actually learned about guitar tone from those records, or both, who knows. But again, attempting objectivity, I can't possibly classify the solo on Savoy Truffle as anything approaching "good guitar tone", to give just one example. I love it to death nonetheless :D

Edited by Red Ant

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Tommy

 

whos next

 

quadrophenia

 

Definitely a 1-2-3 punch, and a creative peak. Not a huge Who fan, and I think 2 out of 3 of those albums have some weak material, but undeniably an impressive 3-album run.

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Ramones

Leave Home

Rocket to Russia

Road to Ruin

End of the Century

Pleasant Dreams

 

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Ramones

Leave Home

Rocket to Russia

Road to Ruin

End of the Century

Pleasant Dreams

(chuckle

:lol: !! )

 

 

 

okay-now some thoughts on the runners up !! )

 

BORN ON THE BAYOU

GREEN RIVER

WILLY AND THE POOR BOYS

COSMOS FACTORY

 

The first 2 have better singles off of !! )

The second pair are better albums !! )

(overall-might belong with the others ?? )

 

:idk:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

the albums that bookend

 

these 2 are good but not in the same league !! ( :

 

Hell and Back

 

-------------------------------------------

 

I guess if you put

 

For Those About To Rock

 

in there they might belong with the others ?? ) :)

 

 

 

:idk:

 

 

 

 

 

 

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But again, attempting objectivity, I can't possibly classify the solo on Savoy Truffle as anything approaching "good guitar tone", to give just one example. I love it to death nonetheless :D

 

The electric guitar is a magic wand. Who says it has to go through a mic'd tube amp? George did a lot of tracks going direct and overloading the mixer input. I think Revolution was another example.

 

Those sounds cut through on the radio and you'd be hard pressed to find another guitarist at the time who was using those tones. One of the things I love about the (later) Beatles records were that they were looking for new sounds. I would describe the guitar sound on Savoy Truffle as "searing".

 

Good guitar tone? As Andres Segovia said: "The electric guitar is not a musical instrument". Ergo, anything goes!

 

Zip

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Any artist / band' date=' any genre - who IYO has had the best three consecutive album run? [/quote']

 

I'll go with Genesis.

 

The run, in total, for me is:

Nursery Cryme

Foxtrot

Selling England By the Pound

Lamb Lies Down on Broadway

Trick of the Tail

Wind $ Wuthering

 

If I had to pick a sweet spot it would be Foxtrot through Lamb.

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Mine also, particularly early in life. But with the benefit of hindsight and broader listening, I have to say The Beatles in particular had a whole lot of gawdawful guitar tones going on. Of course its nigh impossible to separate the guitar tone from iconic recordings which are indelibly burned into our brains, but if I were to attempt objectivity, I'd say that there are a whole lot of failed experiments there, tonally. Lots of thin, abrasive, spiky unpleasantness.

 

They really liked the treble, didn't they? And the amps they were using often had a lot of brightness to begin with - and then they'd have the EMI engineers boost the crud out of it too. :lol:

 

Again, it all WORKS - whether because of the artistry of the creators involved, or because so many of us imbibed this music with mother's milk, so to speak, and actually learned about guitar tone from those records, or both, who knows. But again, attempting objectivity, I can't possibly classify the solo on Savoy Truffle as anything approaching "good guitar tone", to give just one example. I love it to death nonetheless :D

 

While it's far from a "good" guitar tone, it absolutely works, as you said, in the context it was used in. Like you, I love it! The crunchy sax section too - it's far from a "good" sax section recording, but the Beatles didn't want "good" - they were deliberately looking for "different."

 

IIRC, George Martin mentioned that something (I think it was the guitar? or maybe it was the whole mix?) on that song was too bright - and George Harrison basically shut him down by saying he liked it that way...

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I definitely have mixed feelings about chasing the perfect guitar tone. To many guitarists, the perfect tone seems to be whatever sounds polite and unoffensive playing at low volumes, by yourself. Those kind of tones rarely work well in the context of an actual band. Another thing that people do is reflexively change the pickups and do other mods on every new guitar they acquire with the result of making all their guitars sound same-y.

 

These days, I'm much more into preserving the warts and quirks of guitars as they were designed. To me, a G&L should be brighter than a Fender. A Jazzmaster shouldn't have as much sustain as a Strat.

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I don't know if this counts but...

 

The Gist Of The Gemini - Gino Vanelli

Long Misty Days - Robin Trower

Hideaway - America

Wired - Jeff Beck

 

... are all albums, released in 1976, that Geoff Emerick was somehow involved in recording

 

If I was going to pick three Geoff Emerick-recorded or produced records, I think I'd go with...

 

Revolver

Band On The Run

Imperial Bedroom

 

Of course, that leaves off Pepper, but if I had to pick only one Beatles record that he recorded, Revolver would be my favorite. YMMV.

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