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OT: low-wattage heaters


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So it's winter time and my nephew's poor dog is outside in the cold. He seems to be doing fine but I'd like to give him a somewhat warm place to sleep.

 

He has a dog house that he doesn't stay in, but I suppose if I could keep the temps inside it above freezing, he'd be more inclined to stay inside. Bringing him in the house isn't an option.

 

Any ideas for a space warmer that doesn't use a lot of electricity, is safe to use outside (in a dog house), and won't set the poor little guy on fire?

 

Maybe i'll take it upon myself to build him a whole new dog house, but that's a project for another day I think.

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I just did a search for "outdoor pet heater" and it turned up several pads/blankets that seem to fit the bill.

 

Haha, apparently one of the features is "chew resistant cords." I guess no matter how tough the dog, eventually every cord becomes chew resistant.

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Plus one on the light bulb, if the dog needs it. It seems obvious but I'm gonna say it anway; that would be an incandecent bulb not an energy saving flourecent or LED. Sixty watts would be enough to make a difference. A curtain of fabric such as canvas or denim would help keep the heat in but would only be useful if you can teach the dog to go through it.

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I use an infrared heat lamp on a dusk-dawn sensor. I point the lamp at the side of the house. I only do it for the cats. The St. Bernard loves the cold, he's most active when it's below freezing. Just make sure the animals can't get too close to the bulb.

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Ah, although I'm not a sound guy, finally something I know just a bit about.

 

Last winter my dog seemed stiff in the morning. My wife wanted to keep her inside at night. But the dog woke us up shortly before dawn every morning -- multiple times if we didn't put her out.

 

We had a large cage. I guess it's usually called a crate.

 

I have no useful handyman skills, but here's what I did.

 

I bought a roll of insulation and a tarp.

 

I layered the insulation on like a roofer doing building paper, i.e. starting at the sides and working up. I used duct tape to secure it and make it more or less wind-proof. I had enough left over for the floor (I went under the pan). Then I wrapped it with the tarp and put the whole thing adjacent to the house. Covered the inside with blankets. The tarp hangs over the opening, so that the dog almost has to duck under - plenty of overhang.

 

I had read someplace that igloos get to 40 degrees from body heat.

 

Anyway, the dog seems fine in the morning and I didn't have to deal with electrifying anything. I had various ideas for heating it electrically, but nothing that I was absolutely convinced was fireproof.

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I'm with Rick6 on this. No electric devices are needed. Again, assuming the dog is actually cold. Verify this. Insulate the shelter well, and don't forget the floor, with closed cell extruded styro insulation board. Duct tape will work pretty well and make it removable in the summer. Protect the entrance, unless the shelter can be positioned where it won't be exposed to direct wind. Put plenty of insulation under the shelter...the floor will suck heat badly.

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I built a doghouse for my German Shepherd. It was insluated etc etc (sided to match our house, shingle root) but to heat it, we just stuck a 60W lightbulb inside, I think it had a bit of a cage around it. It was all that was needed, and a flap to cover the door.

 

:thu:

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