Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Danocoustic

"Roasted" maple necks

Recommended Posts

Quick look at the videos. A surprising difference. I prefer the ordinary Maple TBH

 

[video=youtube_share;OvyofUHrXRM]

 

Despite the usual youtube 'wise guy' comments level he says in Russian it is just one guitar with the neck swapped

Edited by Chordite

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In an interview with American Lutherie magazine, Ken Warmoth was asked about roasted maple. He said that since customers have started demanding it he now stock flat sawn, quarterswan and flamed. He says it if very stable but the process make the wood brittle "so there is a higher propensity to split and crack, you can split off the side of a head". He says it smells like charcoal while they are working it, they warrant the necks for two years and the cost is roughly double plain maple (but less than some exotics).

 

I'll pass but would certainly put it on a guitar if someone asked. I use mahogany for all my necks so its kind of a moot point.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's just a fad just like fat necks and all-rosewood necks. The roasted necks I have seen felt very dry and smelt like burnt toast.

 

Baked/roasted maple was "invented" by Gibson for use as fingerboards when they had their CITES fiasco and their supply of rosewood was confiscated. The "baked maple" was seen as a workable compromise since maple was a proven fretboard material and the baking was used to make it look darker so as to be suitable for use in place of rosewood. The "substitution" was not universally embraced along with Granadillo and Richlite which were also used as rosewood substitutes until rosewood came back into the Gibson pipeline.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I picked up a Gibson P90 Special some time after that rosewood incident, they were discounting them. It was very light in color when I got it, but after a quick dressing with mineral oil it darkened considerably, and oddly has stayed that way. I think I've had it at least 4 years - it has a 2012 date.

 

The closest I can think to compare is ebony. It has nearly no pores and a very obvious sheen. I've had no problems with it, but honestly has not been played much. Maybe if it got more use the color would change, IDK....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It's just a fad just like fat necks and all-rosewood necks. The roasted necks I have seen felt very dry and smelt like burnt toast.

 

Baked/roasted maple was "invented" by Gibson for use as fingerboards when they had their CITES fiasco and their supply of rosewood was confiscated. The "baked maple" was seen as a workable compromise since maple was a proven fretboard material and the baking was used to make it look darker so as to be suitable for use in place of rosewood. The "substitution" was not universally embraced along with Granadillo and Richlite which were also used as rosewood substitutes until rosewood came back into the Gibson pipeline.

 

Thanks, I knew that but not everyone else does.

 

What I'm referring to is entire necks being roasted, not just fretboards. Seems to be a relatively new thing. Personally, I'm skeptical about the claimed benefits.

 

Incidentally, fat necks aren't a fad for me. I have big hands and fat necks fit me better. I make no claim about their tonal or sustain properties.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
the roasted one sounded more valve so the normal one must be transistor .the roasted one would be nice with some sprouts ans mash .

 

I hear the opposite.

 

I think...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Warmoth will warranty an unfinished roasted maple neck but not a standard maple neck so that must say something about the stability... It's certainly lighter. Lots of legit brands are using them...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Baked/roasted maple was "invented" by Gibson for use as fingerboards when they had their CITES fiasco and their supply of rosewood was confiscated. The "baked maple" was seen as a workable compromise since maple was a proven fretboard material and the baking was used to make it look darker so as to be suitable for use in place of rosewood. The "substitution" was not universally embraced along with Granadillo and Richlite which were also used as rosewood substitutes until rosewood came back into the Gibson pipeline.

 

I'm not sure if Gibson invented baked maple or not (it's quite possible), but they did use it as a rosewood alternative for a while. Some other companies are also using pau ferro (which you didn't mention) as a rosewood alternative. I have never played a baked maple fingerboard-equipped guitar, so I have no opinion on it, although I really don't see the point of baking an entire maple neck instead of just a fretboard.

 

I have played a guitar with a Richlite board. Small point of correction - it is used more as an ebony substitute, not really as a rosewood substitute. In fact, I had the guitar (a Gibson ES-275) here and was playing it for about two weeks before I noticed that the "ebony" had no pores. As much as I'm embarrassed to admit it, prior to that realization, I just assumed it was ebony. Unless you look close, it really does look like it, and as I said in the review, I think the sound and feel of Richlite are essentially indistinguishable from an ebony fretboard.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Warmoth will warranty an unfinished roasted maple neck but not a standard maple neck so that must say something about the stability... It's certainly lighter. Lots of legit brands are using them...

 

The quote is "We warrant these necks for two years just like any of our other necks with no finish on them" (American Lutherie #134, Summer 2018) but he also says that "when they split the head they think the wood was bad, but they just didn't read the instructions"

 

Warmoth does not actually roast the wood themselves, its done by a supplier. Ken says that quality wise its always nice material, he thinks they don't want to waste their time roasting lower grade stuff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My Les Paul Custom Classic has a baked maple fingerboard. I have never noticed any difference from rosewood other than it is ha tighter pores and less figure than rosewood and cost me a lot less due to the fretboard. Buyers tend to pass them up for earlier and later models with rosewood fretboards.

Edited by 6down1togo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My Les Paul Custom Classic has a baked maple fingerboard. I have never noticed any difference from rosewood other than it is ha tighter pores and less figure than rosewood and cost me a lot less due to the fretboard. Buyers tend to pass them up for earlier and later models with rosewood fretboards.

 

Does it feel any different? I do notice a difference when playing a rosewood or regular maple fingerboard - I would have thought that a baked maple fingerboard, while being darker in color, would "feel" more like a regular maple board than a rosewood board - is that not the case?

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

The quote is "We warrant these necks for two years just like any of our other necks with no finish on them" (American Lutherie #134, Summer 2018) but he also says that "when they split the head they think the wood was bad, but they just didn't read the instructions"

 

Warmoth does not actually roast the wood themselves, its done by a supplier. Ken says that quality wise its always nice material, he thinks they don't want to waste their time roasting lower grade stuff.

 

According to their website that you can actually buy stuff from, regular maple necks require a finish and roasted maple do not. You can see which woods need finish based on the charts here:

http://www.warmoth.com/Guitar/Necks/NeckWoods.aspx

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a 2012 Gibson Les Paul Special Humbucker with a baked maple board, it looked great and played and sounded great. The guitar is only gone because I had back issues and needed lighter guitars.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a Firebird Studio, 2018, that has a baked grenadillo fretboard. It plays nicely. My callouses really prevent me from noticing any real major differences from rosewood, or from regular maple, except it is not as slick feeling as a finished wood, definitely more like rosewood and ebony.

 

Gibson also experimented with a wood called preciosa for fretboards back in the early 2000 timeframe. Smartwood Les Pauls had them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...