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Binaural Recordings/Mixing


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Have you tried Spanner yet?

 

http://thecargocult.nz/spanner.shtml

 

As far as plugins, they really haven't caught up yet and outside of Spanner, there's relatively little out there that I'm aware of that comes in at that price (under $300) - there are things like the Waves Surround Bundle, but they'll cost more than that.

 

There have been a few new mics released recently that take binaural recording to the next level - have you ever heard of ambisonics? It's basically a four channel recording using a somewhat different array of four mic capsules. Rode just came out with a sub-$1k ambisonic mic and plugin that might be of interest to you...

 

https://www.harmonycentral.com/news/soundfield-by-rde-nt-sf1-ambisonic-mic-now-shipping

 

Zoom also recently announced a stand-alone VR audio recorder...

 

https://www.harmonycentral.com/news/the-h3-vr-handy-recorder---vr-audio-youve-arrived

 

If you just want to experiment with binaural recording, you can spend the big bucks on a KU-100 dummy head from Neumann, or just get a decent pair of condensers and a Jecklin disk (or make one) and have at it... :idea: Angle the mics out from the disk by 20 degrees and space the capsules 17 centimeters apart, and you get a similar sound to that of a dummy head, without the cost or the hassles of trying to DIY one - a Jecklin Disk is pretty easy to make, comparatively speaking.

 

 

 

 

 

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Have you tried Spanner yet?

 

http://thecargocult.nz/spanner.shtml

 

As far as plugins, they really haven't caught up yet and outside of Spanner, there's relatively little out there that I'm aware of that comes in at that price (under $300) - there are things like the Waves Surround Bundle, but they'll cost more than that.

 

There have been a few new mics released recently that take binaural recording to the next level - have you ever heard of ambisonics? It's basically a four channel recording using a somewhat different array of four mic capsules. Rode just came out with a sub-$1k ambisonic mic and plugin that might be of interest to you...

 

https://www.harmonycentral.com/news/soundfield-by-rde-nt-sf1-ambisonic-mic-now-shipping

 

Zoom also recently announced a stand-alone VR audio recorder...

 

https://www.harmonycentral.com/news/the-h3-vr-handy-recorder---vr-audio-youve-arrived

 

If you just want to experiment with binaural recording, you can spend the big bucks on a KU-100 dummy head from Neumann, or just get a decent pair of condensers and a Jecklin disk (or make one) and have at it... :idea: Angle the mics out from the disk by 20 degrees and space the capsules 17 centimeters apart, and you get a similar sound to that of a dummy head, without the cost or the hassles of trying to DIY one - a Jecklin Disk is pretty easy to make, comparatively speaking.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks for the suggestions Phil, I'll look into some of those. As far as some of these plugins (Anymix, Binaural in Logic Pro, Pro Tools), the demos I've seen and tried, seem to make the microphone setup obsolete. If you can change all the tonal qualities of a track, and then place it in any 3D position in the mix, why would you ever need to record these sound positions with microphones? The software also has the advantage of choosing what type of format of how the mix is heard in playback (5.1 / 7.1/ 8.1 to infinite). With the binaural software, I haven't seen any playback issues though normal stereo equipment, as with the other formats (5.1/ 8.1) may cause your tracks to come out of predetermined locations (speakers), that have limited or no directionality versatility.

 

 

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Thanks for the suggestions Phil, I'll look into some of those. As far as some of these plugins (Anymix, Binaural in Logic Pro, Pro Tools), the demos I've seen and tried, seem to make the microphone setup obsolete. If you can change all the tonal qualities of a track, and then place it in any 3D position in the mix, why would you ever need to record these sound positions with microphones? The software also has the advantage of choosing what type of format of how the mix is heard in playback (5.1 / 7.1/ 8.1 to infinite). With the binaural software, I haven't seen any playback issues though normal stereo equipment, as with the other formats (5.1/ 8.1) may cause your tracks to come out of predetermined locations (speakers), that have limited or no directionality versatility.

 

 

 

IMO, software is no substitute for proper mic technique. Just because the board (or DAW) has a pan control doesn't mean that stereo mic techniques are now obsolete. There's a significant difference between a stereo (or ambisonic) recording and panned mono. If the information isn't captured to begin with, at best, all the software can do is try to simulate it...

 

 

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I think I see what you're thinking. The Spanner software looks closer to what I was looking for. For the project I'm working on, needs tracks to pan around 3D with almost limitless boundaries. For instance, a guitar riff, synth sound, etc, traveling around "me"* is needed. This seems impossible using mics, and only obtainable with good 3D panning software eh?

 

* "central focus area" in 3D, of headphones and surround speaker system

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