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Another studio closes - this time, it's the house that Creedence built...


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And a lot of them have private studios that they set up in their own homes.

 

The home recording revolution is the #1 reason for the decline in commercial studios.

 

Well...It is what it is....Progress can be a bitch sometimes. As the Automobile became more popular, more blacksmiths whose business was heavily reliant on horseshoes went under as well. I'm sure there were poignant, nostalgic moments in towns remembering the blacksmith and livery shops that were once prevalent. As well as the same for the small towns that died when the Interstates passed them by.

 

20 years from now, the 20 somethings of that day will not even know what a recording studio even was.

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
Hopefully in time' date=' Live Nations, Pay Per Play and Corporate ran Radio Stations will die out like Mtv .... so live music can be reborn again with out nepotism, politics and Corporate suits ( Record Companies ) killing music itself.[/quote']

 

Nepotism and pay to play will probably never go away, but corporate radio's influence is declining dramatically. Hopefully Live Nation will be next...

 

I guess studios will be a thing of the past too.

 

I'm not sure about that AJ. People still create and listen to music, and there needs to be places where music can be recorded without worrying about noise interference, which can be a big issue for home-recorded projects. I don't think we'll see commercial studios disappear completely in the coming years, but the numbers are no doubt going to drop, and the survivors are going to have to adapt to the new realities of a rapidly changing industry.

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Nepotism and pay to play will probably never go away, but corporate radio's influence is declining dramatically. Hopefully Live Nation will be next...

 

 

 

I'm not sure about that AJ. People still create and listen to music, and there needs to be places where music can be recorded without worrying about noise interference, which can be a big issue for home-recorded projects. I don't think we'll see commercial studios disappear completely in the coming years, but the numbers are no doubt going to drop, and the survivors are going to have to adapt to the new realities of a rapidly changing industry.

 

I can't tell you the number of times in the past 25 years than the phone has rung or my wife had something very very important to tell me, just making a home recording. If I was paid by the interruption, you might be talking to a millionaire. :D

 

Lot's of guys are just setting up stuff in there a studio garage.

 

Didn't Van Halen do that during the height of Eddie's drinking days?

 

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I can't tell you the number of times in the past 25 years than the phone has rung or my wife had something very very important to tell me, just making a home recording. If I was paid by the interruption, you might be talking to a millionaire. :D

 

Lot's of guys are just setting up stuff in there a studio garage.

 

Didn't Van Halen do that during the height of Eddie's drinking days?

 

Eddie had a pretty impressive home studio at one point - he may still own it. IIRC, it was professionally built and designed - IOW, it was not your typical noise-plagued home studio. :)

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Studios ??? Does anyone think the home studio revolution has put editors/composers in a bubble where as the studio culture gives a chance for on the spot critiquing or helpful hints from another set of ears? eg. if people from down the hall are gathering in one control room, it was better odds there was a popular tune in the making. Or an individual gets in a rut about a few notes that just don't sit right with them and they can't figure out what it is they don't like. Just curious.

 

Oh absolutely. One of the biggest drawbacks of someone working solo in the typical home studio is isolation. You don't get the immediate feedback from other humans (whether it be bandmates, the producer, the engineer, etc.) that you can quickly react to as you're doing takes, nor do you have anyone to offer suggestions when you get into a rut or to bounce ideas off of... it's a significant issue, and IMHO it can definitely have an effect on the output and quality of the output. When it comes to musical endeavors, collaboration is, if not absolutely essential, at the very minimum, very beneficial in the vast majority of cases.

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