Jump to content

Which Music Era?


Vowedlter

Recommended Posts

  • Members

 

I

First record I ever purchased was Joy to the World (Three Dog Night - also known as Jeremiah was a Bullfrog) with the B-Side being "I can hear you calling" -

Now perhaps they were a late 60's era band, but they didn't influence me until 1972. Oh, Geesh, now you went and made me give away how old I am! :)

 

All good Luke17

 

Dendy, how old YOU are? Puleez, I often tell people I am so old that my Mother was a Waitress at ‘The Last Supper’

you are still a mere pup. Laddie, 😊

Now, that song ‘Joy to the World recorded by Three Dog Night? That was written by Hoyt Axton, an old Folkie that my Dad and older brother took me ( as a young lad) to see in NYC back in 1960.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members
Good points ggm1960.

Btw - your crazy delicious link isn't opening for me - says server not responding.

D

 

Hmmmm, worked for me just now from work. My last gig with that band is now established as 9/29. They are a great group and make top dollar in this area but after nearly four years it's time for me to take a break!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Really, using the Decade to define Eras in music of any type is like using four 3-month seasons to define The Weather for an entire hemisphere. It's only correct in the vaguest, most general sense - but Fall is not the same thing in Brownsville versus Minneapolis. Winter is not the same thing in L.A. that it is in Fargo.

 

"The 60s", musically, has a similar variety and development that owes absolutely nothing to the arbitrary use of the decade as a meaningful category.

 

Decade-speak leads to the silliest arguments that shed no light whatsoever on musical styles or history. It's like a kid from Alaska arguing with a kid from Lousiana as to whether you have to wear a coat most days in winter. . Stoooopid....

 

nat

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members
Really, using the Decade to define Eras in music of any type is like using four 3-month seasons to define The Weather for an entire hemisphere. It's only correct in the vaguest, most general sense - but Fall is not the same thing in Brownsville versus Minneapolis. Winter is not the same thing in L.A. that it is in Fargo.

 

"The 60s", musically, has a similar variety and development that owes absolutely nothing to the arbitrary use of the decade as a meaningful category.

 

Decade-speak leads to the silliest arguments that shed no light whatsoever on musical styles or history. It's like a kid from Alaska arguing with a kid from Lousiana as to whether you have to wear a coat most days in winter. . Stoooopid....

 

nat

 

You make a great set of points here Nat. Arguing which decade or musical era was the "Greatest", is simply a platform...For endless argument.

 

It's like arguing about what band was the "Greatest" psychedelic band of the 60's. There will be a hundred names thrown out there, all with merit.

 

But it was The Thirteenth Floor Elevators.

 

I cannot be moved on that. There is no Kryptonite that can pierce my armor on that either.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

I guess I look at these things differently. I don't look at the music from a particular era, but rather what mattered to me based on my age (or era). Growing up, my father played nothing but country and bluegrass, my mother always preferred the big band sounds like Glenn Miller. So during the first years of my life, that was my music - bluegrass and big bands. As I entered my teen years I switched to pop/rock. Maybe I wanted a change, maybe it was a bit of rebellion (it was the 70s after all). But the big bands still had a place. Probably due to high school and playing in the band. In my 20s I was married and starting a family, and so we gravitated back to country and stayed there for a while. Until it seemed country became too much like pop music and so we moved towards bluegrass. Then in my mid 40s I started to look at other music, and the big bands came back into play as well as theatre show music (like 'Hello Dolly' and 'Les Miserables'), although bluegrass was always in there somewhere. Now in my 50s I have looked more in Celtic music and traditional American folk.

 

So over my lifetime I have run the gamut from country to bluegrass to big band to show music and Celtic and folk, plus other stuff sprinkled in from time to time. I can wait to see what the next musical interest in my life will be as I continue through this wonderful journey of sound. :music005:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...