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Drummer vocal mic EQ advice needed


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The drummer in my current band does some backing vocals. Normally I do not EQ the vocals much, but on the drummers vocal I am getting a ton of sizzle from the hats, crash and ride.

 

Is it OK to low pass the vocals to reduce the amount of cymbal in the drummer mic? If so what would be a good setting point? I figure the typical human voice runs the frequencies between 100 and 1.2k...so would it be ok to low pass at say 1k for a typical male voice so cymbals won't bleed into the mix?

 

Or is this a bad idea due to vocal harmonics?

 

FYI...I am using an original 01V mixer and this is for a live setting running sound from stage.

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Not gonna help. For vocal clarity you need all the way up to about 4k (what a landline telephone does) and for natural sound you need all the way up to 20k.

 

Best solution is working with mic polar patterns and positioning. If it has a super- or hyper-cardioid pattern, it'll leak sound from the back, so try a regular cardioid pattern mic, and face it right at the drummer's face, away from the cymbals.

 

If you position it just right, you can catch the cymbals in the dead zone of a hypercardioid as well (sensitive directly behind, with a dead zone in a donut shape around the back), but it'll take some trial and error.

 

Take a look at pages 8-9 of this document:

http://www.shure.com/idc/groups/public/documents/webcontent/us_pro_mics_for_music_sound_ea.pdf

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Hyper may be a poor choice for cymbol rejection. The rear lobe can be awfully large right where you don't want it.

 

I would look at starting w/ an SM-58, something that doesn't have a really large HF boost like some of the newer mics, and also doesn't have a large rear lobe.

 

Also, what is directly behind the drummer? Perhaps your bleed is coming from reflections off of a hard surface behind the drummer?

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Drummer is using an SM58 on a boom stand on high hat side (drummers left). Most of the bars we play have stages with walls on 3 sides so I can see where reflection could be a problem, and we usually put him in a corner for space conservation.

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I recently ran FOH sound and recorded a band from here in Vero Beach. The drummer sings about 20% of the material that the band does. I ran the drummer mic with no eq and all seemed to go well. I'll try to find out what kind of mic he uses and post it here later (he brings his own mic, a condenser of some kind). You can listen to one of the songs he sings here: http://soundcloud.com/richard-king. Check out the song "Mr. Soul". Of course, for the recoreded mixdown I used channel muting on his mic to eliminate bleed when he wasn't singing, something that couldn't be done live. Overall though the live mix was quite good and the band loved it.

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Being a singing drummer, and have used various mics. I have settled on a simple sm57.....directional focus is better than say a 58. The only problem with the 57 is you have to be centered with the mic at all times. If you get off to one side while playing(easy to do) the vocal fades out. Other than that like said in a previous post, cold be bouncing off the walls.

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Being a singing drummer, and have used various mics. I have settled on a simple sm57.....directional focus is better than say a 58. The only problem with the 57 is you have to be centered with the mic at all times. If you get off to one side while playing(easy to do) the vocal fades out. Other than that like said in a previous post, cold be bouncing off the walls.

 

 

I would suggest the 58 instead, or at least use a windscreen with the 57. The performance differences are very small between the two (the "focus" (directionality) is almost identical) but the grill on the 57 is not cleanable (without much work and risk of damage) and the pop filtering of the 2 stage grille/screen on the 58 is superior for vocal applications.

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Our drummer uses a Beta 57 (seems a good match for his voice), or the traditional SM58.

 

Reflections can be a bear, as noted. Also look at cymbal arrangement and how the mic is aimed. I tend to hear more cymbals from the vocal mics in front of the drum set.

 

"Eating" the mic is a good thing, as alluded to with the headset suggestion. Does your drummer sing loud? Louder vocals, closer to mic = less gain = less cymbals.

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