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Amp for both acoustic and electric guitars?

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In out trio/duo I do not use an amp for my acoustic guitar. However, I may be joining a band to play both acoustic and electric guitars. Does anyone know of an amp that can be used effectively for both? A few years ago I remember a Fender acoustic amp that also had voicings for electric guitar. That model is now discontinued.

 

I thank you you for your help.

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I'm very fond of my Fender Deluxe Reverb. It's not designed for acoustic, but it's good and clean. Maybe with a DI in line to send to the mains. And for electric -- awesome! I know there are some does-it-all modeling amps out there but I have this thing against digital and, despite therapy, refuse to subject my beautiful analog signal to the insult of being converted to digital and back again.

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Boss Katana has acoustic as one of their amp types. I bought the 100 watt model this year and it's really great for a solid state amp. Built in efx, any overdrive level you want from clean to full distortion. And the acoustic setting is for acoustic guitars in particular.

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If you're the kind of player that frets over NOS tubes versus a matched set of "empty your wallet" tubes, and/or you've replaced your PUPs a million times, then I don't think you'll find an amp that does both. If you aren't all that fussy then maybe you can find something that is passable for electric and acoustic. Why not go direct with your acoustic and use your monitor? If you don't have separate mixes and monitors, then I would be tempted to go with two smaller dedicated amps.

 

For guitars, are we talking a pre CBS Fender and an older Martin, or a couple of cheapos?

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I'm with Shaster. Maybe there is an amp that may sound good for both...but I have yet to find one. About the closest I came was using the 'acoustisonic' setting on my SCXD, and that was, well, not spectacular, but passable...barely.

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If you're the kind of player that frets over NOS tubes versus a matched set of "empty your wallet" tubes' date=' and/or you've replaced your PUPs a million times. . .[/quote']

 

ah yes, tubes: the world's most expensive tone control

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The standard of amps sims is such that I would take a long hard look at the new Atomic Ampli Firebox which is due out any day. It's the size of a single pedal has some built in effects and can handle downloaded IRs. Their existing products produce, to mine and others ears, some fantastic tones both magnetic and acoustic.

Plus of course the advantage of having your amp in your guitar case and a single lead out to the board.

Just an alternative for consideration.

https://blog.andertons.co.uk/guitars/atomic-amplifire-namm-2017

Edited by steve mac

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I used to use an acoustic on some songs with my band. I always went through a preamp into the PA. You can certainly use a tube amp, but it will color your tone.

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I usually run my acoustic to the PA through a passive DI [and a BodyRez pedal] if I am doing both acoustic and electric. I am toying with starting a song out on acoustic, looping it with the Ditto, and then switching to electric...

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Beyond the Katana Bob Dey recommended, Laney made something years ago that was supposed to be what you want but they're rare. What about an acoustic amp and a pedalboard?

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In part, you should consider what you're using the two guitars for. In a band context, I mostly see players/singers use a flat-top as a rhythm instrument; strumming to drive the beat.

 

[video=youtube;wsgXeMFFAK8]

 

Sonic nuance is 'way secondary to being heard clearly without muddying the mix.

 

And electric? A whole different matter. Tone tone tone and tone.

 

So unless your band has you finger-picking and playing leads on the acoustic, I'd say focus on your electric sound and just run the acoustic through the PA.

Edited by pogo97

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What about an acoustic amp and a pedalboard?

 

This 100 percent, buy the best sounding full range amp you can find. One made for providing a clear, undistorted full range sound.

IE, an acoustic amp, keyboard amp or portable PA speaker with internal mixer. And get a Line 6 or whatever brand you prefer pedal and plug into that with your electric. Depending on the PA the band uses use could also skip the amplification and plug directly into the PA with the pedal board and a DI or in some cases directly with your acoustic.

 

The caveat about going directly into the PA is if others aren't doing it and your band doesn't have multiple monitors each with its own mix you can easily annoy some of the other band members if they can't hear themselves because all they hear is you coming through the monitors.

 

 

These pedal boards make it it easy to play multiple Instruments. In one band I play multiple instruments. The band is a trio just me, an acoustic/electric guitarist and a drummer. For this band I often need to fill up the sound with whatever is needed for the song. I use a small mixer (Yamaha MG10XU) between all my gear and the PA. I have a Line6 HD500 pedal board into the mixer, I use it with my electric. I also have a bass that goes through a preamp into the mixer. I plug my acoustic through a Fishman DI into the mixer and I plug my keyboard into the mixer. For both guitars and bass I use wireless units (Line 6) to keep from tripping over cables! The mixer allows me to plug the aux out into a powered speaker and adjust the monitor level for each instrument right on stage near me without having to go over to the PA board. Juggling multiple instruments can be a real pain in the rear. But I like playing with these guys they are very laid back (and help me load in and out!) and the result makes it possible to play songs that cannot be done without multiple instruments. This way I can do a laid back James Taylor, a power trio ZZ-Top or a Synth Heavy 80's song or even Billy Joel piano man all in the same set. Since I don't carry multiple heavy amps the biggest things for me are the 88 key board and bench. I can get all my stuff in the back of my jeep easily.

 

Edited by kbeaumont
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I agree with the people who are saying it's a good idea to get a full-range amp, and then use pedals and amp sims for the electric.

 

Another option would be something like a Line 6 Spider V, which is designed as an electric amp, but since the speaker system in it and amp itself are full-range, it can be used effectively with an acoustic guitar too, without the compromises in high frequencies that come along with plugging an acoustic into most electric guitar amps. It even comes with some acoustic presets built-in, and it's easy to create your own. Click the link to check out my in-depth Pro Review of it. :wave:

 

 

 

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Back when I did an acoustic gig I just plugged in the the PA mixer. The combination of woofer and horn/tweeter in PA speakers works great with acoustic guitar frequencies, and PA amps are pure, clean power. Add some quality reverb for a nice sound IMO. I never cared for amps made for acoustic guitar.

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I've used a bass amp for acoustic guitar and it works well as long as you don't need effects. They have the advantage of being comparatively cheap.

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I see they even managed to squeeze a kitchen sink into that Line 6 amp. Doesn't look like it will fetch my slippers and light my pipe, but I'll keep reading, maybe it will!

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Hey guys! I need some help with choosing my very first amp. I'm 17, started learning to play almost 5 years ago and really enjoy it. I find garage and psychedelic sound suitable for me the most. I have a so-called "band" and we're all green, so please don't flame (:

I've googled quite a lot and found out VOX have really good feedback, esp. in this review https://wisepick.org/best-modeling-amp/

And I'm actually considering to buy the top 1 amp from this list https://www.amazon.com/dp/B017KBLIPW/

(primarily because it has a quite cheap 40W model and we don't have much money yet)

So, did anyone have experience with it and what's your opinion? If not, what will be your personal suggestion under $250? Maybe there's even a reason for buying solid or tube amp? Also, is 40W enough for backyard gigs?

Thanks in advance!

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Posted (edited)
Hey guys! I need some help with choosing my very first amp. I'm 17, started learning to play almost 5 years ago and really enjoy it. I find garage and psychedelic sound suitable for me the most. I have a so-called "band" and we're all green, so please don't flame (:

I've googled quite a lot and found out VOX have really good feedback, esp. in this review https://wisepick.org/best-modeling-amp/

And I'm actually considering to buy the top 1 amp from this list https://www.amazon.com/dp/B017KBLIPW/

(primarily because it has a quite cheap 40W model and we don't have much money yet)

So, did anyone have experience with it and what's your opinion? If not, what will be your personal suggestion under $250? Maybe there's even a reason for buying solid or tube amp? Also, is 40W enough for backyard gigs?

Thanks in advance!

 

okay, lots of questions here....easy ones first.

Vox built their reputation on tube amps, and they still make them. Their solid state [sS] stuff, IMHO is decent for bedroom practice, but not playing with a band.

To be clear, most of the low wattage modeling amps will sound fine in your bedroom, but will sound like bees in a tin can when playing in a large room with a drummer. Worse outdoors...

 

A 40w SS amp wit ha 10" speaker will not keep up with a drummer. A band performance level SS amp should be a minimum of 60 watts.

 

I would suggest you look at reverb.com for a used amp, preferably a tube amp. A 15 watt tube amp will be appreciably louder than a 40W SS amp. Sounds weird, but it is true.

This amp is just about right: https://reverb.com/item/18802109-fender-super-champ-xd-2009-black

Another possibility is this: https://www.monoprice.com/product?p_...RoCYqYQAvD_BwE

 

No it is not the greatest amp, but it is a cheap Chinese clone of the venerable Fender Blues Junior [15W, 1x12], at less than half the price, and will get pretty loud. It also has a 1W switch to allow you to push the amp at low [bedroom level] volume. These are not well constructed cabinets, and they will not accept physical abuse well. Don't stand on it or it will collapse ;)

 

Here's the thing, all the googling and youtube demos mean nothing until you have the amp with your ax plugged into it. Go to the local music stores and try out amps, especially try tube amps you can't afford just to get a feel for what they can do [Marshall, Fender, BlackStar, Vox, etc.]. Then test all the solid state amps in your price range ....keeping in mind what I stated about SS amps wattage vs volume. Try out the Yamaha THR amps, try a Katana, try line 6, try Bugera...there are so many 'bedroom' amps out there today. There are also a plethora of relatively inexpensive 5W tube amps, but they won't stand up to a loud drummer either. What I'm saying is, get out and try every amp you can, other wise you'll know less than when you started.

 

Another thing...the amp world will open up the more you have to spend [inorite?] Save up another c-note, and you could probably find a used Blues Junior or a SS Champion 100 for around $350.

Edited by daddymack
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Hey guys! I need some help with choosing my very first amp. I'm 17, started learning to play almost 5 years ago and really enjoy it. I find garage and psychedelic sound suitable for me the most. I have a so-called "band" and we're all green, so please don't flame (:

I've googled quite a lot and found out VOX have really good feedback, esp. in this review https://wisepick.org/best-modeling-amp/

And I'm actually considering to buy the top 1 amp from this list https://www.amazon.com/dp/B017KBLIPW/

(primarily because it has a quite cheap 40W model and we don't have much money yet)

So, did anyone have experience with it and what's your opinion? If not, what will be your personal suggestion under $250? Maybe there's even a reason for buying solid or tube amp? Also, is 40W enough for backyard gigs?

Thanks in advance!

First, welcome to the Forum. Second, this should be in the Amp Forum. Third, forget any "best" lists you find online unless it's one from a reputable guitar-related magazine. Fourth, on a personal note, if you're in the St. Louis area I have a 65 Watt Fender SS amp that's gathering dust and I'll sell it to you cheap. It does a good job of reproducing Fender cleans and it gets loud. The drive channel isn't great.

 

Check CraigsList or Guitar Center if there's one near you. Pawn shops typically have trouble selling amps and sell them cheap but quality varies and some pawn shop amps are junk. My main amp these days is a Roland Cube 80XL modelling amp that I found on CraigsList, and it does a fine job for the worship music I play, and has no trouble keeping up with a (reasonably sane) drummer. If you do go for a modelling amp, I'd choose Roland/Boss or Vox. Very straightforward to operate. The others I've tried practically required an engineering degree. See what's actually out there and get back to us. We'll try to narrow your choices.

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DE, I almost moved this over to amps, but the general attitude there has always been to push high end gear, and little to zero help on entry level, whereas we, in here, are far more accommodating...:wave:

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DE' date=' I almost moved this over to amps, but the general attitude there has always been to push high end gear, and little to zero help on entry level, whereas we, in here, are far more accommodating...:wave:[/quote']

 

Aren't we, though…

 

BTW, what happened to the "reply" button?

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Aren't we, though…

 

BTW, what happened to the "reply" button?

 

you mean 'comment'? Apparently it was too confusing for the Poli whiners to manage, so it had to go ;)

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I've had excellent results with a Fishman Solo Artist. I wish the build quality was a bit better but it sounds excellent and is loud enough for me, my acoustic and/or electric guitar, vocals and backing tracks to be heard indoors or out for up to 100 people. I just used it direct on a video shoot and the video guys agreed it sounded excellent. It's under 30 lbs. and gets used much more often than my Turbosound IP-2000. 

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Welcome to HC, Riley!

I have been touting the SA220 from the day mine arrived [like 10 years ago!], and have been ogling the SA330 for many months.

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