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Fixing broken plastic


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I flogged around on the web some attempting to find good, real-world useful & to the point info on fixing broken plastic stuff... and... well... so much for that good idea. I might have just as well tried to find to the point info on diagnosing a "check engine" light. :facepalm:

 

Is there anybody here who really knows how to fix broken plastic... like which glues to use for what types of plastic, and how to make a determination of what type of plastic it is?

 

I guess it's safe to assume that any glue that comes in a plastic bottle probably isn't suitable for glueing together the type of plastic that the bottle is made of.

 

Currently I'd like to fix some cracked jack plates, handles, and corners on some Community MVP38 wedges. I suppose I could possibly just ("just") replace the cracked plastic stuff... but the cracks are minimal at this point... and it would be nice if I could stop the cracks before it gets worse (kind of like fixing a chip in a windshield before it cracks from corner to corner).

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I was going to suggest some sort of epoxy (JB weld), but that works best when mating some pieces that are relatively rough. If you want to have a nice, clean repair on pieces that mate perfectly (like broken plastic), you can't get enough product in there to make it stick.

 

Some sort of superglue seems to be made for this application, but for me it tends to fail just about 100% of the time (unless we're talking about a christmas ornament or something)

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One thing I can suggest is to drill a small hole at the end of the crack to try and prevent crack propagation. No sharp 'corners' = less likely to continue cracking.

 

 

 

+1

 

Also if you use epoxy, it will help if you can v-notch the back side of the crack (assuming there's a hidden side to the item) and fill it with epoxy rather than just slapping eopxy on the surface. An old beer can opener is great for this task, but youv'e probably got other tools that can handle it.

 

If depth/thickness isn't an issue, fiberglass and resin make *really* strong repairs.

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I use thin superglue - capillary action draws it into little cracks. You can't get thin SG at the local - I get it from StewMac.com. BE CAREFUL with this stuff! It has a very low surface tension and comes out of the bottle FAST unless you get one of the little pipette extensions (and even that will fool you). You have to barely squeeze the bottle, and watch carefully for the glue to come down the spout. If you think you'll just "stop squeezing when it comes out", you'll be in for a rude awakening. I've glued myself a couple of times.

 

I've cured several buzzing Leslie cabinets by running this stuff around all of the inside joints. I use damn near a whole bottle, but none of the buzzes has returned. (When you use that much SG, you need some ventilation - wow.)

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(When you use that much SG, you need some ventilation - wow.)

 

 

Agreed the fumes are very light (since your eyeballs are oxygen permeable, I think it's very bad for your eyes (it's certainly a major irritant)).

 

Mark: My fav is 2 part epoxy. If you don't need to fix it in place and if it has an unseen backside, fiberglass reinforcment loose weave "cloth" makes for a uber strong fix (like fixing fiberglass body parts or boat hulls).

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