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Bad performance....question


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Great thread folks!

 

Steinbergerhack, once it runs its course here, I think I am going to move it over to SSS if that's okay with you. I think it deserves a broader audience and by moving it over there we can share it with some of the non-poli forum folks, as well as run it in the HC Newsletter.

 

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Well i would hope no one would come up to you in a church and slam you. I mean it's church after all. I mean I could see people getting irate if you were playing "How great Thou Art" and lurched into "Kick Out The Jams" mid chorus or something.

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[ATTACH=CONFIG]n31928641[/ATTACH]

Yep I had my share of looking for a rock to craw under afterwards. This last weekend my guitar just went dead after fading out during the last song where I was supposed build up the crescendo...I thought it was the amp's rectifier tube but it was a bad connection in my pedal board. With 15 stomps that's 45 connections counting the AC plugs chained together.

 

This was part of my challenge last week during tech rehearsals. I had a tube intermittently going bad in my amp - the one that drives the FX loop. Of course, this means that it acted like it was something wrong in the FX rack, wah pedal, cable, etc. After two nights of swapping out every cable and battery in the rig, I popped a new tube in for opening night, and FINALLY had a rig that worked properly.....and then proceeded to make every mistake in the book in my playing. Oh, well...some days you're the windshield, some days you're the bug.

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This was part of my challenge last week during tech rehearsals. I had a tube intermittently going bad in my amp - the one that drives the FX loop. Of course, this means that it acted like it was something wrong in the FX rack, wah pedal, cable, etc. After two nights of swapping out every cable and battery in the rig, I popped a new tube in for opening night, and FINALLY had a rig that worked properly.....and then proceeded to make every mistake in the book in my playing. Oh, well...some days you're the windshield, some days you're the bug.

 

The very thing that makes tube amps great is also their weakness. Fortunately it occured at rehearsal and not during the show.

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The very thing that makes tube amps great is also their weakness. Fortunately it occured at rehearsal and not during the show.

 

Yes, and I'm a bit angry at myself for that. I had just put new power tubes in a few weeks ago, but neglected to swap the pre-amp tubes. Lesson learned.

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Naturally I wasn't expecting pitchforks but maybe ''damning with faint praise.'' ;) Seriously, the point is that nobody complained or told me how bad it was. The point is that we're often our worst critics and, for most of us, a bad performance isn't the end of the world.

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I think we all want that and it is doable - be the best that you can be.

 

 

 

You'd best get that thought out of your head or you'll be beating yourself up for the rest of your life.

 

I've been dealing with tendonitis on and off for the past ten years or so. I have good days and bad days. The worst part is the lack of confidence that comes with it.

 

I was very critical of my bandmates when their alcohol consumption compromised their playing. Now I occasionally sound like I'm drunk when I'm playing because I can't form the chords or hit the notes properly. I was invited to sit in with a a Jazz group I was listening to in a bar a few weeks ago but didn't know if it was a good day or a bad day so, without a chance to warm up and test myself, I had to pass.

 

 

It's jazz... If you accidentally add a b9 or a #5 or whatever to a chord, a musician hearing it will think "cool interpretation", and a nonmusician will not even notice.

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IMHO, a mistake lasts maybe 50 milliseconds, while a musical piece runs into minutes. So any mistake you do will be about 1/60th the duration of a song. (1.6%)

 

Now consider audience perception: most, if they're paying very close attention, will be able to process maybe 4% of the information (sound) coming from the stage (this is based on learning and comprehension studies I read while teaching college years ago). So the odds that they will notice a mistake are pretty low.

 

It is foolish to beat yourself up for not being perfect 1.6% of the time which only has a 4% chance of being noticed. And unproductive; it really doesn't help anything. My motto: FIDO (f*** it, drive on)

Edited by philboking
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I never could understand why sometimes I felt gigs that were perfect didn't get a response, but people could love gigs that had issues. Eventually I realized that if we were having fun, the audience liked the gig. If we were working too hard or overthinking, the audience wasn't having fun either.

 

Soooo...we decided that our priority was making sure the audience was having fun, and that happened only if we had fun...and that happened only if we were so well-rehearsed we didn't have to think about what we did and could just play from the heart.

 

You'll still have those bad nights, but sometimes you can turn that around. Like when a string broke in the middle of a song and I said "And now, our bonus act: 'How to change a guitar string.' Okay everyone, pay attention because you never know when you'll have to replace a broken guitar string." It started with "Strings come in these little paper envelopes..."

 

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It's jazz... If you accidentally add a b9 or a #5 or whatever to a chord, a musician hearing it will think "cool interpretation", and a nonmusician will not even notice.

 

Not in my gigs.

 

Saturday night, after the show I asked the director for feedback. He said "Overture, bar 90, beat 3 you played an Eb that should be an E." One missed eighth note out of a 2 1/2 hour show. He was right - it was a passing tone between a Bb and an A; I was misreading the staff note based on the chord notation above the staff.

Edited by SteinbergerHack
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I accept the compliment gracefully and gratefully and take pride in the fact that the entire performance was solid enough to cover for the mistakes only those in the band noticed. A good overall-end-result and pleasing the audience is the ultimate goal, right?

 

My only issue is when the band takes such comments as a cover for mistakes. As if somehow they are acceptable as long as "they loved us anyway". we should always be setting the bar as high as possible.

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Fair enough - - there are strict taskmasters out there, in classical and in some strictly scripted jazz and other stuff (I've heard Frank Zappa was one). I suppose I spoke from the 'audience viewpoint' - - I'm pretty sure a musical director doesn't qualify as audience... ;)

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