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How to project sound left, right and front?


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We have a couple of venues where there are people listening to us, or at least trying to listen to us, from the sides as well as the front. We use 2 12" mains (plenty for our acoustic duo and the smaller venues we play) and I was wondering if I could add another 12" speaker or 2 to disperse the sound better. If so, where is the best place to position, and how should I angle, the 3rd, and perhaps, 4th speaker(s) so that I get more sound coverage but do not create muddiness, or other sonic problems. Thanks for your help.

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where is the best place to position, and how should I angle, the 3rd, and perhaps, 4th speaker(s) so that I get more sound coverage but do not create muddiness, or other sonic problems.

 

 

When possible, don't "overlap" your coverage. The goal generally is for an audience member to hear only one speaker without hearing the others (easier said than done). Depending on where you need to send extra coverage remote speakers could also be used (but a lot more work)

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I read this thread a couple of times before my post, and it was helpful. Still, I thought the difference in the situation I described and my level of ingorance warranted the thread I began.

How is your situation different? (besides you being perhaps quiet enough to use Bose L1's :lol:).

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When possible, don't "overlap" your coverage. The goal generally is for an audience member to hear only one speaker without hearing the others (easier said than done). Depending on where you need to send extra coverage remote speakers could also be used (but a lot more work)

 

 

This is very helpful. Thank you. My speakers have 65 degree horizontal dispersion, so avoiding overlap when we play on a thrust/proscenium stage type setting should be possible, or at least easier to achieve than if I had wider dispersion speakers. Still, it seems that at some point far from the stage, if the speakers could still be heard, there would be some overlap. Remote speakers, if I understand what you mean by this, would require the use of some delay so as to avoid waves of sound arriving at different times, right? This seems like it would be a lot of work and difficult to get right.

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How is your situation different? (besides you being perhaps quiet enough to use Bose L1's
:lol:
).

 

My impression after looking at the pictures provided in that link was that his group did not have people off directly to the sides and even behind him a bit on the sides. If you look at the pink balloon in one of the pictures (back right), that will indicate where we have people listening at a couple of venues. I'll leave the Bose comment alone for now...;)

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The overlap I was referring to is in the "direct field". Yes, certainly the sound will mix and become a fog of everything. I should also clarify that once there is enough difference between the level of the intended speaker and the unintended speaker the problem pretty much goes away.

 

A agree with Andy that this may not be the end of the world (which is why I said "when possible") ... but as a "goal" it should try to be avoided.

 

Time delay is a whole new set of problems ... but again it can make a big difference depending on the circumstances. Its another one of those tradeoffs.

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Direct field is where you hear more sound directly coming from the speaker than is being reflected. So outdoors you are almost always in the direct field while indoors it rarely extends more than 1/3rd of the way to the back wall (and sometimes a LOT shorter)

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Direct field is where you hear more sound directly coming from the speaker than is being reflected. So outdoors you are almost always in the direct field while indoors it rarely extends more than 1/3rd of the way to the back wall (and sometimes a LOT shorter)

 

 

Thanks for the explanation. The venues I was referring to in this thread are outdoors - flea markets, farmer's markets, etc.

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Depends on how you define "problem". It WILL have some effect. How much effect will depend on exactly how you point them in relation to each other. Whether or not that is a "problem" depends on if it is a problem to you. It could be argued that some degradation to the sound quality could be heard as an "improvement" to the sound quality.

 

Probably no one will die however. You simply do what you gotta do. If you get more benefit than detriment you stick with if. If not you don't. But don't make too big a deal out of this. My suggestion is just to give you something to shoot at. You'll probably never actually hit it. I don't, but I try to as much as possible.

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Depends on how you define "problem". It WILL have some effect. How much effect will depend on exactly how you point them in relation to each other. Whether or not that is a "problem" depends on if it is a problem to you. It could be argued that some degradation to the sound quality could be heard as an "improvement" to the sound quality.


Probably no one will die however. You simply do what you gotta do. If you get more benefit than detriment you stick with if. If not you don't. But don't make too big a deal out of this. My suggestion is just to give you something to shoot at. You'll probably never actually hit it. I don't, but I try to as much as possible.

 

 

Got it. Thanks for the advice.

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We have a couple of venues where there are people listening to us, or at least trying to listen to us, from the sides as well as the front. We use 2 12" mains (plenty for our acoustic duo and the smaller venues we play) and I was wondering if I could add another 12" speaker or 2 to disperse the sound better. If so, where is the best place to position, and how should I angle, the 3rd, and perhaps, 4th speaker(s) so that I get more sound coverage but do not create muddiness, or other sonic problems. Thanks for your help.

 

 

Are you certain people can't hear you from the sides? Are you certain those people want to?

 

I'm asking because at my local Pacific National Ehibition there is a beer tent that has Classic Rock bands and such. They have a Family Seating area, and in that area they have a Mackie or two on sticks at warp ten volume so the family's can hear the bands as well. Problem is it's as loud or louder in the family area than it is in the beer tent (when I was there anyway).

 

Maybe the folks are off to the side for a reason, maybe not. Maybe they don't need the same volume or clarity as the folks in front - I don't know the venue so it's just a guess.

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Are you certain people can't hear you from the sides? Are you certain those people want to?


I'm asking because at my local Pacific National Ehibition there is a beer tent that has Classic Rock bands and such. They have a Family Seating area, and in that area they have a Mackie or two on sticks at warp ten volume so the family's can hear the bands as well. Problem is it's as loud or louder in the family area than it is in the beer tent (when I was there anyway).


Maybe the folks are off to the side for a reason, maybe not. Maybe they don't need the same volume or clarity as the folks in front - I don't know the venue so it's just a guess.

 

 

The venues I am talking about would benefit from broader sound dispersion. There are people all around us who are there to listen us, that is why they are there. The other 80% of the space is for other things (buying produce, etc.). We do not try to fill that with sound. These are large, outdoor events and we provide music for those who want/choose to listen.

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