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Ratchet-style speaker or light stand?


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We're currently using a pair of Global GT-132 (I believe) crank stands for our truss. Problem is, it's very light truss -- Global mini -- and the stands themselves weigh more than the entire truss setup. Most shows we play only involve two truss pieces with a couple LEDs on them, and sometimes lugging out the GT-132s is more hassle than it's worth. The truss sits at the rear of the stage, so there's no chance of it being run into by a drunken fan or anything, and we're thinking we just don't need something quite as sturdy. We used to fly the mains -- the original reason for buying them -- but don't anymore.

 

Anyway, I saw one stand that mentioned you could raise it up and it'd automatically ratchet into place every 5" so that the stand couldn't drop down. Something like that would be perfect as it'd allow one person to raise the whole thing, one side at a time (about a foot each time). Problem is, it's an On-Stage stand, and I haven't had much luck with them in the past. It looks like Ultimate has the air-lift feature as well, but without the ratchet, and for significantly more money (more than 3x the price). Any experience with the On-Stage version? It says it's rated for use "even with a 100 lb powered speaker", and our truss is likely less than that, distributed over two stands.

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I'd go with Bill's idea. The TS99's are excellent and really easy to use, I've got a pair of the 90's (and 80's) and they are about the easiest thing to use. The aluminum is thicker, the non tube parts are very very durable and don't break in 3 years like the on stage stuff.

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Neat. Looking into it. Thanks for the suggestion.

 

Our old stands are basically just cheap On-Stage ones which we made our own additions to, in order to make them taller. They're having no problem supporting the truss but they're getting pretty beat, and we're sliding a bolt into the pin holes to keep them up because the pins are long gone. With one person, it's a bit of a hassle to raise the truss to height. Plus, I'm pretty short, so that doesn't help me either. I've got a gig coming up next month where I may be running the system on my own so it might be worth my while to pick up a pair of 'em.

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we're sliding a bolt into the pin holes to keep them up because the pins are long gone.

 

 

Replacement pins and other hardware are available rather cheaply from the manufacturer. We use the cheap On Stage stands as well, and when they finally die I'll likely replace them with something better, so I'm not really defending those stands. But I bought a big bag of pins and nuts and bolts because we seem to lose a couple at every gig.

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Any experience with the On-Stage version? It says it's rated for use "even with a 100 lb powered speaker", and our truss is likely less than that, distributed over two stands.

 

 

I use those Ultimate TS90's and it's a good system. One thing to remember though, is that it's a manual dead lift on the pole. If your truss is "less than 100 lb's distributed over two stands," does that mean the total weight is close to 200 lbs.?

 

I wouldn't personally want to lift more than about 50 - 60 lbs. on one of these stands, even with the way it locks on each lift. The pole just isn't that easy to grab onto, for lifting heavy weights. Also, if one end of the truss is 1 foot higher and you're lifting the other end (running back and forth, doing this solo), it's going to feel like more than just half the weight as you're raising that lower pole. A crank stand may be heavier to cart around, but it's a lot easier on your arms and back.

 

Take all that with a grain of salt... I'm an older guy, and increasingly aware of trying to prevent injury, or just minimize wear and tear on my back and shoulders. When I was in my 20's, I wouldn't have thought twice about it.

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Hercules LS700B We've done a few hundred shows with them. You still get the features of a crank stand and, at 22 lbs, it's less than 1/2 the weight of the stands you're carrying now. It's a good compromise between the beastly cranks and the POS crank stands that strip out in a year. The only bummer is the cross bar is square so it's pretty useless to us.
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Take a look at the Ultimate TS-99. It is a lighting stand with the Tele-Lock feature. You raise it and it will stay where you leave it. Once at height you lock it in place. A 24" vertical extension is also available.


 

 

I agree. The Ultimates are nice stands. We've been using them for years and they've held up great.

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