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Are audio engineers egotistical?


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I've known a few "sound engineering technicians" (as the article puts it) who came across as egotistical but most of them were fresh out of soundman school.

 

As I found in the IT business, those who really know their stuff are usually quiet about it until their services are needed.

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According to this article, sound engineering is one of the top professions for self-important, arrogant and egotistical people.

 

http://www.msn.com/en-us/money/careersandeducation/3-professions-with-the-most-arrogant-workers/ar-AAiovfX?li=BBnbfcL

 

I'm not quite sure what to think or say about that... :idk::lol:

 

 

 

Call him up and tell him what an idiot he is, of course.

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Are all Butchers, Bakers, Candlestick Makers, Tinkers, Taylors Egotistical? Ridiculous.

 

Engineers often have to wear many hats to please their customers. Anyone who has to work in a job as a salesmen can come off as appearing to be Egotistical but its often a miss-interpretation by the public. I don't think most engineers enjoy dealing with the public as a salesman because it goes against their normal focus on working in a more solitary work situation. There are all kinds in all businesses though. Part of the Mystique involved in show business is part of the game people just don't understand.

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I found that being an recording studio engineer requires putting your ego aside and giving the customer what they want, while still informing them about their options. To be good, it also requires a lot of patience and tolerance of "artistic" temperament.

 

I worked mostly in video production, often in the audio role. In that area you can't be too egotistical as the rest of the crew and talent often don't understand how important it is to capture good sound and often consider your work a hindrance. You often have to tactfully ask for another take when a plane flies overhead or other unwanted sound ruins a take. As with working in a recording studio, it is extremely important to build confidence and avoid creating stress for the talent/performers or they will not give their best performance.

 

In my experience, a live sound engineer who really knows the system may seem egotistical when others try to interfere, but taking charge (if that is your job) is often necessary to get things done on time and safely. It also requires handling unrealistic expectations from performers who want you to be their stagehand/personal assistant rather than the house sound guy.

 

Appearing competent and confident is often required when playing a key role in a production because your clients and crew need to feel that you are capable of doing the job. Projecting that competence/confidence can appear egotistical, especially if you lack the lack the skills or experience to pull it off. But, sometimes you have to dive into something that stretches (or exceeds) your abilities while pretending to be confident, especially as you begin your career. Its a balancing act.

 

Edited by Hard Truth
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