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UstadKhanAli

My photo is featured on "The 101 Best Night Sky Photos of 2015" on space.com!

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My photo is featured on "The 101 Best Night Sky Photos of 2015" on the prestigious space.com! Just thought I'd share. [url]http://www.space.com/30919-milky-way-over-arches-national-park-photo.html?cmpid=514630_20160104_56841406&adbid=10153237678896466&adbpl=fb&adbpr=17610706465[/url] [img]https://kenleephotography.files.wordpress.com/2014/07/2159kenlee_archesnatpark-doublearchmilkywayselfie-20sf28iso4000-2014-05-23-1148pm-3330k-ournewworld-700px.jpg[/img]
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Heartiest Congratulations Ken! And a beautiful photo it indeed is!

 

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I should mention that this is a "selfie". If I do "selfies"' date=' then can be rather elaborate. :D[/quote']

 

That makes it even Cooler Ken!!!

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Congratulations Ken! I love your approach to selfies - go big, or go home! ;) I'd like to hear more of the details about how you got that amazing shot. Location, camera, ISO, shutter time, lighting (if any), etc. - if you feel like sharing of course. :)

 

Impressive work as usual! :philthumb:

 

 

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Congratulations Ken! I love your approach to selfies - go big, or go home! ;) I'd like to hear more of the details about how you got that amazing shot. Location, camera, ISO, shutter time, lighting (if any), etc. - if you feel like sharing of course. :)

 

Impressive work as usual! :philthumb:

 

 

Thanks, Phil. And yeah, this one, I went big. This was an extremely elaborate shot that took a really long time to set up and pull off.

The location is Arches National Park in Utah (Double Arch). I used a Nikon D610, which is Nikon's current entry level full frame camera, and a Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8 lens, which is an absurdly sharp lens that is sharp even in the corners when used at full aperture.

 

To pull off this shot at night, I wanted the arch and ground illuminated, but also be in the photo at the same time, so obviously, with this one, I had to blend two photos together.

To capture the Milky Way, which requires a relatively quick exposure and high ISO to get the faint lights of the Milky Way, I used ISO 4000 f/2.8 for 20 seconds.

 

I blended in another photo with much lower ISO where the ground ground/arch is illuminated.

 

I've had some other photographers describe this as the most elaborate selfie they've ever seen. I have no idea about that, but it was a fun exercise in problem-solving and creativity, and I was relieved to have pulled it off.

 

 

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I just find your talent off the charts...I took a black and white course at the college 10 years or more ago and I loved it so much I built a small dark room in the garage that I used for several years before I gave it up. Every once in a while I got some good shots and burned and dodged with some success but man I never came close to the type of stuff you do...really great pic!

 

The room now stores all my wife's seasonal decorations...not a complete waste I guess...I couldn't find any buyers for the enlarger or lenses I bought or easel and trays so I gave the stuff away to a thrift store. I hope somebody came along to use it but I doubt it. Probably ended up in the junk yard.

 

My avatar was my attempt at creative digital photography...

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Your avatar looks good, as well as I can see something that's smaller than a postage stamp. :D

 

I think I've been reasonably good at photography, both film and digital. Like many, I grew up using film, and have used film until the last nine years or so.

 

But digital photography unlocked my creativity in a way that film did not, largely due to instantly being able to see the image, and it keeping all the camera setting information so I could easily refer back to it.

 

And then, when I began doing long exposure photography, I felt like I found my "voice". Long exposure, night, star trails, and light painting photography. My head just spun at the possibilities. Keeping a shutter open for, 10, 20, 30 seconds, maybe minutes - or even hours - and recording all that movement in one single image. Fantastic. I love it.

 

Like much of the music I do, which is ambient and often features delays or multiple delays, I feel like I am doing with photography what I do with my guitar, keyboards, or in the studio. It's a logical extension of how I play music.

 

But what I didn't count on is how magical I feel when I am out at night. It's quiet. I'm connecting with the night, my surroundings, with nature. I am so tuned in that sometimes, I can tell which way the stars are drifting. Seeing the Milky Way arch across the entire sky in this glorious band. It's an amazing experience. And if it weren't for night photography and long exposure photography, I wouldn't be experiencing that.

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8939kenlee_2015-11-23_2159_204sf8iso200-4000k_alabamahills-mobiusarch-sierras-lightpainting-1000px.jpg

 

This is from a short while ago in Owens Valley in California, and is a long exposure photo taken at night, so the streaks in the sky are the stars moving due to the rotation of the earth.

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2384kenlee_archesnatpark-delicatearchabove-doortoinfinity-2014-06-25-1237am-20sf28iso4000-960px.jpg

 

Delicate Arch, Arches National Park. Single shot (single exposure, in other words), as is the one above in the Owens Valley.

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startrails-tronapinnacles3-50min-30sf28iso400.jpg

 

Mojave Desert, 50 minute exposure, "stacked". I illuminated the tufas, or pinnacles, with a hand-held flashlight during the exposure to enhance the way some of the moonlight was falling upon the rocks.

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Funny, this is the one I was actually looking for, but I couldn't find it so I started posting other examples. Anyway, this is the same arch as the one featured on the top of this post, the one in space.com. I simply lit this very differently, and time, no "selfie". :D As you can tell, I pulled back a bit with this one. While it's from more or less the same vantage point, facing in the same direction, I went wider with the lens to show more of the double lens. I'd need a fisheye to capture both arches, but a Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8 is still pretty wide. After all, the arch in front from top to bottom is about 140 feet/424 meters.

 

2460kenlee_archesnatpark-doublearchmilkyway-redlightpainted-2014-06-25-1119pm-20sf28iso4000-1000px.jpg

 

Jeeeez, I must have had three of those stupid error messages while composing this post.

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