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I don't know if you have all seen this before but it just came to my attention today and I found it quite interesting - even after all these years.

 

http://www.thewhitealbumproject.com/...at-the-tracks/

"… He took a book off the shelf intending to write a song based on the first words he read, which were 'gently weeping'.
This is the first 8 track recording (by anyone) at EMI Abbey Road
."

 

I did not know that.

 

 

 

 

Edited by onelife
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The listing for "Everybody's Got Something To Hide Except For Me And My Monkey" has George playing the firebell. Most accounts I've read have Paul playing it.

 

I have been pondering this recording lately - "Everybody's Got....Monkey". Silly as it may sound, I recently heard it with "new ears" - the firebell got my attention. Another thing I've noticed is what someone called the "rhythmic dislocation" in the intro. I've still never figured out quite what they're doing in the intro.

 

The other thing so interesting to me is that I read they sped up the tape to get a more frenetic sound. Reportedly they sped the tape up, changing the song length from 3'07 to 2'29. Seems to me this would have required recording the song a tone or two lower. The song is in E - so it seems recording it slower and speeding it up would've required recording in D or down in C. I guess the statement about "43 cycles per second rather than 50" is basically saying this.

 

 

I copied a few comments from the beatlesbible about recording the song. Also about the rhythmic dislocation. Down below

 

From the beatlesbible website

 

The next day they recorded six takes of the still-untitled song. Onto the last of these they overdubbed a number of instruments, including two lead guitars, handbell and shaker. A reduction mix to free up spare tracks also resulted in the song being sped up from 3'07" to 2'29"; it would end up faster still following a later mix.

 

Another piece from the beatlesbible

 

The sixth take was the best, and lasted 3'07". Two reduction mixes of this, numbered takes seven and eight, were then made, with the tape machine running at 43 cycles per second rather than 50, so the song was faster, shorter, and in a higher key upon playback.

 

Another comment on "rhythmic dislocation" in the intro

 

There is something very interesting in the introduction of the song, which mistakes the listener where the measure´s 1 actually is . It´s a kind of ‘ rhythmic dislocation which surprises when we finally get where the measure´s 1 beat is . Great song, great performance, great record . I wish there was a video of The Beatles playing this …

 

Another reader comment....

 

It took me a longtime to figure out the rhythm of the intro–the second bass drum beat is on 1 and the first guitar chord is on the upbeat of 2.

Edited by davd_indigo
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The fire bell was played brilliantly, regardless of who played it - it adds such an element of wild abandon to the song IMO... and if you listen to it closely, it's got a lot of feel and groove to it.

 

I've also heard it was Paul - this is the first time I've seen anything that suggested it was played by George.

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I used to play "me and my monkey" in a band and we never found anything unusual about the intro.

 

It's always been obvious the first kick drum heard in the song is on the one. The rhythm guitar starts on the and of one and there is another kick on the and of four.

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"It's always been obvious the first kick drum heard in the song is on the one. The rhythm guitar starts on the and of one and there is another kick on the and of four"

 

I'll take what you're saying and listen to the beginning and look to catch on to the trick. Give it a try anyway. I was having trouble playing "Straight No Chaser" by Thelonious Monk. My cousin, a drummer, suggested I try learning it playing a walking bass - to play against the odd phrasing/rhythmic grouping in the tune and it helped.

 

 

Monk and Lennon in the same thread. Life is truly good.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uxdnQOs0BNo

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