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Dendy Jarrett

Which Music Era?

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I recently subscribed to SiriusXM and have gotten stuck on 70's on 7. While I switched around for the first few weeks between 60's on 6 and 80's on 8, I seem to feel at home at 70's on 7.

 

So, based on that non-scientific analysis, I am thinking that the 70's most influenced me when it comes to music. I was born in 1962, so by the time I came into my impressionable years, this would be the correct "fit".

 

 

What era most influenced you? Are you a 70's on 7 person or ...?

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If I had to choose one it would be 70's on 7. I love all sorts of music from different eras, but the 70's era just feels like home... biggest influence.

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The '64 British Invasion thru about '73 I suppose is my foundational period of bonding with stuff, all the usual suspects, Brit and Yank rockers, and a big dollop of the black girl groups and soul. Definitely my comfort music.

 

But the golden era of electronic music from approx. '88 through '97 is another huge influence on me. William Orbit, The Orb, Orbital, Underworld, Amon Tobin, Autechre, FSOL, and a select bunch of the ambient types, etc.

 

The French composers ranging chronologically from Faure to Debussy on to Ravel are another big influence.

 

The Americana scene that's going on now and has been going on for some time has a ton of influential stuff, but at my age, the first thing you hear in almost anything current is the background of source material. It gets harder to be all that surprised - but when I am surprised, it's a big deal.

 

Jazz is another huge influence, but no particular period, just a list of heroes from the 50s to current.

 

The first loves do tend to be the strongest, but I've always been looking for new stuff ceaselessly. Don't like the idea of getting stuck in the past, ya know?

 

nat whilk ii

 

 

Edited by nat whilk II

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When I was a child I liked to listen to the top forty radio stations on my Panasonic panapet transistor radio. The first type of music I remember really being attracted to was the R&B music of the early seventies. Stuff like Al Green, The Chi-Lites, The O'Jays, The Undisputed Truth, The Dramatics, and Gladys Knight and the Pips.

 

When I was eleven years old I rode with a friend to a YMCA weekend Camporee. His father drove us in his pickup truck that had a 8-track tape player. On the way there my friend plugged in a cartridge called Led Zeppelin II. I now recognize that ride as being a pivotal point in my life.

 

When I got to high school I was really into progressive rock music. Bands like Yes and Pink Floyd, Emerson Lake and Palmer and Todd Rundgren's Utopia. That music eventually led me into jazz rock and jazz fusion music like the Dixie Dregs and Return to Forever.

 

In 1980 I moved to Athens, Georgia and got heavily into the local music scene with bands like R.E.M., Pylon, Love Tractor, the Side Effects and the Method Actors. Which led me into what became the New Wave/ Alternative music of the eighties.

 

So I guess for me the 70's and 80's were my biggest musical influences but I really like music from all decades and even though I no longer have my Panapet radio I still listen to top forty radio and modern pop music. But I don't care much for most of today's R&B music.

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Greatest Era is the 60s

 

The Two biggest groups in Rock and Roll came from the 60s

 

1. The Beatles

2. Led Zeppelin I and II were released in 1969

 

No other decade since has produced the amount of music icons/legends as this decade, many of whom are still touring based on their 60s catalog.

 

Bob Dylan

Rolling Stones

The Who

The Kinks

Beach Boys

Pink Floyd

Byrds

Buffalo Springfield - Neil Young, Stephen Stills and Ritchie Furay (Poco)

Yardbirds who begat Clapton Beck and Page and eventually became Led Zeppelin

Cream

Jimi Hendrix acknowledged as the greatest rock guitarist of all time

Otis Redding

The Supremes who begat Diana Ross

Marvin Gaye

Stevie Wonder

Four Tops

The Temptations

Velvet Underground

Booker T and The MGs

Tom Jones

Traffic Steve Winwood and Dave Mason

Linda Ronstadt

The Grateful Dead

Janis Joplin

Aretha Franklin

The Monkees

The Jefferson Airplane

Creedence Clearwarter Revival

Santana

the Productions Of Phil Spector

The songwriting of Carole King and Gerry Goffin

The songwriting of Burt Bacharach and Hal David

Ike and Tina Turner

The Stooges

The Doors

Johnny Winter - first album Progressive Blues came out in 1968

Donovan

Sam and Dave

Duane and Gregg Allman's first album came out in 1968 as members of The Hour Glass

The Four Seasons

Simon & Garfunkel

Dusty Springfield

The Mothers Of Invention - Frank Zappa

The Band

The Hollies

The Moody Blues

The Small Faces who became The Faces

Jeff Beck Group - Jeff Beck, Rod Stewart and Ron Wood

 

 

Who am I forgetting? I know there's a few.

 

But look at that list! Can any decade since compete?

 

The 60s rules!

 

Edited by epi56ebony
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It would be really difficult for me to pick just one decade or era. I love stuff from multiple eras, but if pressed to pick just one, I still don't think I could narrow it down that far - I'd have to say the 60s and 70s were probably equally influential for me, with the 80s being not far behind, and the 50s being an honorable mention.

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I get a lot of comments that my music sounds very 80s, although I personally think some of it has a 60s vibe and some tunes are 2000ish dance music. Current music has infused my mixing and production with "DJ thinking"--dropping things out, tweaking processors while playing, sudden dynamics shifts, etc.

 

So I've been influenced very strongly by multiple eras in music.

 

The baroque period in general, Bach in particular

The 50s for the simplicity of someone like Buddy Holly -- you really do need only three chords :)

The 60s for the psychedelic/experimental nature as well as electric blues

The 70s for jazz, particularly Miles Davis

The 80s for when synthesizers and electronic sounds really took over

The late 90s for techno

The 2000s for EDM

 

Fold in all ingredients, stir, cook at 350 degrees for 45 minutes, let cool, and music comes out :)

 

 

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I've found something to influence me from every decade since the 60's, but the 60's probably had the most influence. The Rise of Southern Blues/Rock and Jazz/ Rock fusion in the seventies..Punk, no not really. New Wave? Most definetly. Grunge? Pearl Jam and Soundgarden, STP...They all gave me hope that rock wouldn't die. Nevermind Nirvana...Never dug them.

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I really like satellite radio. When I first got my truck, I just surfed for a while, setting channels when I heard something I liked. Outlaw Country is one of my favorites now, along with Coffehouse and the Joint (reggae). My granddaughter found Disney and knows how to select it when she gets in the truck. It's exposed me to a lot of today's pop music, some of which isn't all that bad. When she asked me to accompany her for her third grade talent show, the song she had chosen was, to my surprise, Rockin' Robin, straight out of the fifties It sure took a long time for me to get into the grade school talent show, with a song that came from my grade school years.

 

I grew up in the fifties and sixties. Top Forty radio was just that - the top forty sellers, whether it was the Beatles, Johnny Cash, Sinatra or Soeur Sourire. There was gimmicky stuff like Winchester Cathedral, along with Roger Miller, who defied classification. When well done, I liked it all.

 

My moniker comes from a song on Led Zep II, which I was learning for some friends' wedding anniversary. That album was often on my turntable, along with Mayall's Turning Point, CSN, Woodstock, Rubber Soul, Nashville Skyline and many, many others.

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I turned on the satellite on in my Mustang a couple of times for maybe a years total listening. The second time I got like 6 months for $20 and then discontinued it. What annoyed me most was the loss of high frequency due to the low sample rate. Half the talk stations sounded like they were talking in a fish bowl with those annoying high frequency artifacts in the 10K range. Same thing for the music, it all sounded like low quality MP3s.

 

When I could tolerate it, I'd listen to all the eras. Sometimes it might be a Big band tune that catches my ear and another time something very modern. Much or the 70's 80's stuff I cant even listen to. I'm just so oversaturated by all the hit songs from those eras. Occasionally they'd put on a tune I haven't heard before or some track off and album that never got air play and I'd listen, but how many times can you hear the same songs over and over and not know every note they play.

 

When I listen to the stations I want to hear the songs I might have missed during those years, not the ones I heard day in and day out for years. You can hear all of that stuff on regular FM stations.

 

The other bad part, is if you do hear something you like you have to guess who the band was. The sets are just computers playing back an endless random loop and no one is at home to tell you who may have recorded the song. Commercial radio isn't much better either but they at least acknowledge who played occasionally.

 

Having shut it off I don't miss it however. I'm not in the car enough to justify the $20 a month they want to charge. It should be like $1~2 a month. Heck Netflix is under $10 and you have your choice of selections.

 

Second the quality of the feed is awful. The high end grates my nerves like fingernails on a chalkboard. Third, there's nothing live on there. Even your news and talk stations are all taped playbacks. Anytime you want to know what's happening in the real world, you have to switch back to Commercial radio anyway. 4th, their song selections blow chunks. Its all random selection and there's never any change to the randomness. You'd think they might have a discography of a band or artist and play a bunch of stuff you' may not have heard. This is where DJ's came in. They often added tidbits about the bands that would stir interest in their music.

 

I know this all sounds negative, and I suppose it is. I'd say satellite should fail and for good reason. There's not enough human intervention guiding its distribution and for what they charge per month/ they should have much better quality sound, not lame MP3 quality feeds that sound worse then free internet radio stations.

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I find I like much of almost any era. There is definitely a case to be made for music that is popular when one of a certain formative, impressionable age. In my case, having been born in 1961, the 70s is that era. But I suspect (more than suspect, actually) that just about everyone has that same feeling for the music that came out when they were pre-teen and teenager.

 

But there's much I love about the 60s, 80s, 90s, and the decades that preceded my birth as well.

 

As far as SXM goes, I disagree with most of what WRGKMC says. Yes, the sound quality is spotty---some stations seem to have more bandwidth and are therefore more listenable than others, but I find it no worse than FM overall. Better actually. But I disagree about the programming. For major musical eras like the 60s, 70s and 80s, you have multiple choices. From the "just the hits" stations like the aforementioned "70s on 7" to more 'deeper' stations. I love 80s music but don't listen to "80s on 8" much specifically because I don't want to listen to a station that programs pretty much just like what I can find on FM. But I find I like "First Wave" new wave station and "Hair Nation" hair metal stations to be much more fun. They always seem to play a lot of stuff I haven't heard in years although, obviously if you listen to any one station long enough, you start to hear repeats. Plus, they most definitely have DJs who give you tidbits about the bands and the music. The Hair Nation station, for example, has a lot of guys from those old bands doing guest DJ spots. How much of it is live? I dunno. Is that really important It's music. It was all recorded decades ago anyway.

 

And the news and talk stations? They are live when they are live. The news updates on the hour are live and the talk shows on stations like POTUS are live but also repeated later. I'm a big fan of "The Press Pool" on POTUS and I tweet the host sometimes. She's read many of my tweets live on the air. I don't know how much more "live" or "what's happening now" you can get then that?

 

Most of the news channels are simulcasts of TV stations. Listening to CNN or CNBC is just as live as the TV stations are.

 

What can I say. I like SXM. I think it's got pretty good variety for what it is. But some people are never happy with radio unless it's programmed just for their particular taste it seems. I guess that's more of what Spotify is all about?

 

Also, I haven't checked it out yet, but there seems to be some sort of Spotify-ish version of SXM on their mobile app?

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I don't have XM (and from what I can tell wouldn't much care for it). I don't imagine I'd be a 70s-on-7 guy, though. While there was a lot of great music I engaged with in the 70s, I thought a lot of the rock was just garbage, all that doofus 3 Dog Night/Chicago/Marshall Tucker/Doobies/Deep Purpled stuff. That said, the 80s I had been so looking forward to turned out to be just even lamer, pop music-wise.

 

As there had been in the 60s and 70s, though, here was a lot of great music on the margins, however, and some of the big labels had wised up and had specialty labels covering world music and the similarly sprawling catch-all genre of 'post-punk/outsider' music. A lot of that, perhaps sadly, ossified into the 'indie' scene of the 90s with the major labels getting involved with trying to max profits from those feeder labels by picking pliable and easy to package winners like Green Day and other punk-flavored pop. On the hip hop side in the 90s, gangsta had pushed aside 'conscious' rap of outfits like Public Enemy, and producers were starting to go for novelty sounds. One of the few things in that era that fired me up was trip hop and downtempo -- unfortunately, most of it seemed shamelessly derivative largely of a few influences: Portishead, Massive Attack, Tricky. And then, in 1998, came Auto-Freakin-Tune. facepalm.gif

 

 

Do they have a 30s on 3?

Edited by blue2blue

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My moniker comes from a song on Led Zep II, which I was learning for some friends' wedding anniversary. That album was often on my turntable, along with Mayall's Turning Point, CSN, Woodstock, Rubber Soul, Nashville Skyline and many, many others.

 

 

I hadn't heard that song in a long time, and I really like it a lot, so I figured, why not? :)

 

[video=youtube;u1z4vkPWkLQ]

 

Cool story about your moniker - thanks for sharing it! :cool2:

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Do they have a 30s on 3?

 

They don't go back that far, but they do have a 40s on 4 and a 50s on 5 and a couple of traditional jazz/standards stations. As well as one that just plays showtunes, another for classic blues, and what seems like a hundred variations on classic rock and pop.

 

I dunno. Maybe I'm just not picky enough with my musical tastes, but with the couple of hundred stations they have (and even more on the internet and mobile app versions), I've never found it very difficult to find a song or other sort of program I want to hear at any given moment.

 

Looking at the "rock" section right at this moment my choices on the various stations are

Elvis doing "Unchained Medley",

a live Springsteen concert from 1982,

Dion's "Donna the Primadonna",

Pearl Jam "Long Road",

a Grateful dead concert from 1979,

Paul Simon's "You're the One",

Police "Synchronicity II",

Elton John "Rocket Man',

The Velvet Underground, "Im Waiting for the Man",

Leon Russell "Wild Horses",

Alabama Shakes "Future People",

Gov't Mule "Banks of the Deep End",

Dwight Yoakam "Man of Constant Sorrow",

CSNY "Carry On",

Captain Sensible "Wot",

Veruca Salt "Seether",

Tirzah "Make It Up",

Circa Waves "T-Shirt Weather",

Skipknot "Killpop",

Ozzy Osbourne "Let Me Hear You Scream",

Bang Tango "Dancin' On Coals",

Mors Principium Est "We Are The Sleep",

Corrosion of Conformity "Albatross",

Tarrus Riley "Never Leave I",

G n R "Sweet Child of Mine",

Etta James "A Sunday Kind of Love",

Sublime "Santeria",

Disturbed "The Night",

Bon Jovi "Livin' on a Prayer".

 

And that's just the "rock" section. There are other stations for pop, hip-hop, R&B, dance/electronic, country, Christian, jazz, classical, latino and "party".

 

Not trying to sound like a salesman for SXM, but I just find it odd that the diversity of the programming would be the complaint. Especially when compared to options available to us older folks when we were kids on the radio.

 

:idk:

 

 

 

 

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I hadn't heard that song in a long time, and I really like it a lot, so I figured, why not? :)

 

[video=youtube;u1z4vkPWkLQ]

 

Cool story about your moniker - thanks for sharing it! :cool2:

 

Never have seen that video, thanks Phil.

 

Did you know that the guy who designed the original smiley face got less than a hundred dollars for it from an insurance company that was trying to find inspirational material for their employees? Later on, a pair of brothers noticed a lot of customer interest in the buttons, checked to see if the design was copyrighted, then added the little lines at the edge of the smile. They made lots of bank from the fad.

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Never have seen that video, thanks Phil.

 

Did you know that the guy who designed the original smiley face got less than a hundred dollars for it from an insurance company that was trying to find inspirational material for their employees? Later on, a pair of brothers noticed a lot of customer interest in the buttons, checked to see if the design was copyrighted, then added the little lines at the edge of the smile. They made lots of bank from the fad.

 

:)

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2. Led Zeppelin I and II were released in 1969

 

 

 

I don't think you can really draw such bright lines between eras and decades. Stuff definitely tends to overlap. Sure, LZ put out a couple of albums in 1969 but it's their 70s output where they went beyond being just a blues-riff based band and became the Mighty Zep. Not much of anyone considers them a 60s band. Same to be said about Pink Floyd.

 

I also would make the argument that musically the "70s" began a year or two earlier than January 1, 1970. Sometime after the Summer of Love, the riots and assassinations of 1968, and around the time that recording studios started using at least 8 tracks for most recordings. 1969 was a great year for music, but most of the rock stuff sounds much more "70s" than "60s" to me. Both in the sounds of the recordings and the style of writing and performances.

 

Take an album like "Bridge over Troubled Water". Gone are the simplistic folk leanings of the earlier S&G stuff and in its place is a sophisticated, lush, warmly arranged and produced album. One that sounds much more like Simon's later 70s work than their earlier 60s stuff. Similar thing with the Stones' "Let It Bleed". That's 70s rock all the way. "Abbey Road" too. The 60s are all but gone from that album.

 

All the eras are great for their own reasons, in my view. The 50s was the birth of rock 'n roll. In the 60s it was a rebellious teen trying to find its identity. In the 70s rock 'n roll grew up.

 

In the 80s it was a new generation of rockers using new technologies to create its own identity. In the 90s the new generation is deciding that maybe mom and dad weren't so wrong after all.

 

 

 

Edited by Vito Corleone
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I got SiriusXM with my car about a year ago. After the free trial was over I found that there was a lot I liked about it, particularly on road trips. I listen to a lot of different things at different times so I have about 15 channels preset. Most of the similar genres are grouped together so you can easily get to a lot more without having to have them preset. I listen to the decade based channels occasionally but like most popular music there is a fair amount of music that was nice enough at the time but doesn't appeal to me now. Maybe one out of three songs on any of those 60's on 6, 70's on 7 up through the 90's are songs I'm glad I heard. There are some other channels though that have a higher percentage. The Loft (Channel 30) has a nice mix of newer and established artists that are a little outside the mainstream, Classic Vinyl plays late 60's to late 70's rock, Deep Cuts has songs that got less airplay during the same time frame. First Wave plays alternative from the early 80's through the early 90's - artists like the Police, Depeche Mode, The Cure, Ramones. Not my cup of tea, but there are a few metal and arena rock channels. I'll listen to one of the 4 or 5 jazz channels from classic Miles, Coltrane, Oscar Peterson, Grant Green through more modern and some 'smooth jazz', even a channel named 'Strictly Sinatra'. Blues, Bluegrass, College, Classical, whatever. All in all, I can usually find something to fit the mood, even if the mood only lasts for 20 minutes or so.

 

As for the sound quality, yeah it's not as good as CD's, probably not even as good as my iPod when I use that instead, but it sure beats sorting through discs and the content certainly is agreeable to me than anything I can find on the radio. Besides, I'm in the car. If I want to listen to high quality audio I will sit in my living room or my studio. It's a secondary activity when I'm driving.

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Did you know that the guy who designed the original smiley face got less than a hundred dollars for it from an insurance company that was trying to find inspirational material for their employees? Later on, a pair of brothers noticed a lot of customer interest in the buttons, checked to see if the design was copyrighted, then added the little lines at the edge of the smile. They made lots of bank from the fad.

 

:thumbsdown::philpalm:

 

 

 

 

 

 

(No, I didn't know that. Very interesting!)

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I don't think you can really draw such bright lines between eras and decades. Stuff definitely tends to overlap. Sure, LZ put out a couple of albums in 1969 but it's their 70s output where they went beyond being just a blues-riff based band and became the Mighty Zep. Not much of anyone considers them a 60s band. Same to be said about Pink Floyd.

 

I agree. Musical trends and styles don't automatically change in popularity in sync with the changing of the decades. There's a lot of music that was produced in the early 60s that would have fit into a late 50s radio playlist relatively well, and plenty of overlap occurred in other decades too.

 

I also agree with you to a large degree about Zep - in many ways they were the quintessential 70s rock band - but I'm not so sure I can say the same about agreeing with you about Pink Floyd. Sure, they were huge in the 70s, and produced some of their greatest work in that decade, but their earlier Syd Barrett era stuff is most definitely 60s in era, sound and vibe. The Piper at the Gates of Dawn was released in '67 and A Saucerful of Secrets came out in 1968. Both are unabashedly "60s albums" IMHO.

 

I think Floyd is a rare example of a band that was popular in more than one era, and with more than one style or "sound."

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I also agree with you to a large degree about Zep - in many ways they were the quintessential 70s rock band - but I'm not so sure I can say the same about agreeing with you about Pink Floyd. Sure, they were huge in the 70s, and produced some of their greatest work in that decade, but their earlier Syd Barrett era stuff is most definitely 60s in era, sound and vibe. The Piper at the Gates of Dawn was released in '67 and A Saucerful of Secrets came out in 1968. Both are unabashedly "60s albums" IMHO.

 

I think Floyd is a rare example of a band that was popular in more than one era, and with more than one style or "sound."

 

True. Although I might disagree about the strength of their earlier popularity. Had they not become a full on 70's band with Dark Side of The Moon, I think they'd mostly just be a footnote in the annals of rock history.

 

Genesis or The Bee Gees, on the other hand.....

 

 

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I don't think they would have nearly the legacy they do today without DSOTM, not to mention some of their other 70s era material. No arguments there. :)

 

And I agree - DSOTM is a very "70s" album.

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What era most influenced you?

 

Well, I really like a lot of '60s and '70s rock.

 

But for influence? Probably mid-'80s and early '90s. I think a lot of influence on my playing involved things like Peter Gabriel "So", Brian Eno's ambient stuff that he continued making during that time, The Cocteau Twins, The Cure, Nine Inch Nails, The Police, The Edge's playing in U2 (cool use of delay as well as the layering he did), and some of the Chicago industrial bands on Wax Trax and stuff like that.

 

 

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I don't think they would have nearly the legacy they do today without DSOTM, not to mention some of their other 70s era material. No arguments there. :)

 

And I agree - DSOTM is a very "70s" album.

 

as an aside I was on a trip to Nassau Colosseum in Feb 1980 when I realized "ANOTHER BRICK" was full on DISCO !! )

more Floyd fans than not would BRISTLE when I pointed this out !! ) :lol:

one guy REFUSED to acknowledge this reality til I showed an article similar to this in Mojo Mag !! ( :

http://www.houstonpress.com/music/the-disco-experiment-why-it-worked-for-pink-floyd-but-not-kiss-6774163

 

all time fav channels on SXM are

59 Willie's Roadhouse

49 Soultown

30 The Loft

26 Classic Vinyl

70 BB King's Bluesville

5

6

7

8

and

60 Outlaw Country

[video=youtube;GMmQWBrBhvc]

 

fetch?photoid=31414626&thumb=1fetch?photoid=31414626&thumb=1fetch?photoid=31414626&thumb=1

 

 

 

 

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as an aside I was on a trip to Nassau Colosseum in Feb 1980 when I realized "ANOTHER BRICK" was full on DISCO !! )

more Floyd fans than not would BRISTLE when I pointed this out !! ) :lol:

 

 

Pretty much EVERY rock band had their "disco" song around '79-'80....

 

I read a story once where supposedly Bob Ezrin told Nick Mason to play the drum beat from "Stayin' Alive" for "Another Brick". Probably the main reason that song was a big hit single.

 

My cover band does a mashup of those two songs. It turns a few heads at first when we start singing "Brick" on top of the "Stayin' Alive" groove. Then people start getting into it when they figure it out.

 

 

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one guy REFUSED to acknowledge this reality til I showed an article similar to this in Mojo Mag !!

 

 

 

I think you'd have to be pretty dim not to recognize that "Another Brick" was a take on disco. But I've known people like that. People that are so militantly into a certain style of music that they won't even give other styles a chance.

 

I used to work with a guy who hated disco. One day on lunch break everybody stood around in the parking lot and watched him pull off his "Disco Sucks" bumper sticker and replace it with his brand new "New Wave Sucks" bumper sticker.

 

 

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