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Dendy Jarrett

Child Prodigy: How do you explain this type of talent?

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You may or may not be into jazz. It isn't music I listen to every day. But, when a friend shared this with me, I couldn't keep it to myself.

 

How do you explain this? This 11 (ELEVEN!!!) year old is such an "old soul" and his playing is fantastic, but more so, his interpretation of what is going on around him with other musicians. This is a wisdom that usually takes decades to master (if a musician ever does).

 

This little guy is Joey Alexander.

 

Enjoy- I'll find some more Prodigy's to post up.

 

[video=youtube;UCyfG9M5hz4]

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Impressive! :philthumb:

 

As far as where that kind of talent comes from, heaven knows. I sure don't. :idk:

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Aptitude meets environment. Too bad they only want dummies for industrial use.

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This is how I explain mine. (True story) biggrin.gif

Edited by Beck

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How do you explain this type of talent?

 

I believe we see the world through filters that limit what we can perceive. These filters are needed so we will stay focused on basic survival and propagation - the survival of the species depends on it.

 

For some, who we may view as extraordinary, they have a much less filtered view and are capable of grasping concepts at an early age that most of us spend a lifetime learning.

 

I have an adult son who is a high functioning autistic. He told me he sees patterns in everything and can do complex math, including square roots, in his head. He has just completed his Masters thesis in abstract math and computer science and will be joining Google shortly.

 

It's all there but some of us can see it easier and more clearly than others.

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I keep wondering about the background story. Did dad jam on the tablas at the local music store jam ? Was this spontaneous combustion ? Usually it's something like mom plays flute in the symphony and dad's a physicist.

 

I listened to him doing Round Midnight and he is amazing. Maybe in a couple of years after he's digested Schoenberg and Bartok - BY EAR - he'll become a musical seer (see- er).

 

[video=youtube;Y_fQrcEfXRU]

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Access at a early age, the kid was exposed to these works at a subconcious level before he even popped out, and when he did, a keyboard was available and the natural extension of his first perceptions became achievable. A fair amount of discipline, guidance and direction did the rest...before life, women, wine or negative influences became part of the equation...it's called neuro-linguistic programming and a lot of parents do it to their children without even realizing it.

Or maybe intentionally & on purpose with ulterior motivation.

I was the same way, but I didn't get to a piano till well into my teens after drugs, booze and the angst of high school, hormones and the basic inequalities of life had had a chance to take hold.

What passes for genius more often than not is little more than access,

guidance and innocence....but make no mistake this kid is brilliant...

long may he shine...

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You may or may not be into jazz. It isn't music I listen to every day. But, when a friend shared this with me, I couldn't keep it to myself.

 

How do you explain this? This 11 (ELEVEN!!!) year old is such an "old soul" and his playing is fantastic, but more so, his interpretation of what is going on around him with other musicians. This is a wisdom that usually takes decades to master (if a musician ever does).

 

This little guy is Joey Alexander.

 

Enjoy- I'll find some more Prodigy's to post up.

 

[video=youtube;UCyfG9M5hz4]

He seems to have a near-mindbending grasp of form and tradition and an improvisational ability that builds upon that. In an earlier era we might have called him a musical 'old soul.'

Edited by blue2blue

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This hardly compares to the amazing "mind's ears" of Joey Alexander. But I came across this video some months ago. Not genius, but very talented. Living on the streets around Venice Beach CA.

 

Should mention that her guitar playing begins at around 9 minutes.

 

[video=youtube;ThanInD0LBs]

Edited by davd_indigo
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Maybe I'm looking at this an odd way, but where will these people be in 20 years? What are the child prodigies of 20 years ago doing now?

 

We tend to get caught up in OMG! So YOUNG!!! without thinking about the support and environment they will desperately need to be developing and presenting these talents to audiences for decades to come. I am concerned that too many child prodigies leave the prodigy behind with the child.

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I am very envious of people who appear to have great musical skills and talents with little obvious effort. They piss me off.

 

Research indicates that music is best learned at the same ages when language is learned. Multiple languages can also be learned at that time also. It is unfortunate that more young children aren't exposed to music and multiple languages in those critical years.

 

But a musical mind is only part of the equation, the child also needs to develop physical skills. I suspect that an unusually strong abaility to concentrate on one task for a long period of time is required. A bit of autistic tendencies and/or a tiger mom is probably most helpful for that.

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In India, families with a history of being musicians will teach their kids music at a very young age and most of those kids will become excellent musicians. Not all those kids could be born with special brains, which supports the theory that the time of first exposure to music instruction is the most important factor in making kids into prodigies.

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Maybe I'm looking at this an odd way, but where will these people be in 20 years? What are the child prodigies of 20 years ago doing now?

 

We tend to get caught up in OMG! So YOUNG!!! without thinking about the support and environment they will desperately need to be developing and presenting these talents to audiences for decades to come. I am concerned that too many child prodigies leave the prodigy behind with the child.

 

I seen Joe Bonnamassa in Utica, N.Y., in the late 1980's, impressed the hell out of me. Played a faithful rendition of some SRV tunes.

Some kids are early bloomers, who's gifts blossom early but lose interest or just the simple fact that life gets in the way, While others fight to to improve but bloom later in life.

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I believe we see the world through filters that limit what we can perceive. These filters are needed so we will stay focused on basic survival and propagation - the survival of the species depends on it.

 

For some, who we may view as extraordinary, they have a much less filtered view and are capable of grasping concepts at an early age that most of us spend a lifetime learning.

 

I have an adult son who is a high functioning autistic. He told me he sees patterns in everything and can do complex math, including square roots, in his head. He has just completed his Masters thesis in abstract math and computer science and will be joining Google shortly.

 

It's all there but some of us can see it easier and more clearly than others.

 

You are onto something... Our limitations are all self-imposed. Filters... in a way, it is the same thing. Recognizing this opens many doors.

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