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The thing about pickups....


billybilly
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Every guitar has an inherent sound and requires a particular pickup to bring out the sound you are chasing. Never, have two guitars (even made out of the same woods), sounded the same to me.

 

Examples... I like a pickup with more mid-range when using Ash to compensate. My Alder Strat has a very full inherent tone so I require a pickup with articulation. My Les Paul without a maple cap sounds great with Burstbucker Pros, some find them harsh on the highs but without a maple cap, they are gold.

Edited by billybilly
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Yep there's an art to matching pickups to a guitar, that's for sure. I had to remove a GFS 60's repro from the bridge of my 89 American and replace it with the modded HS-3 (converted to true single coil ala Eric Johnson) from my 93 MIM because the guitar is inherently bright. So I now have one GFS and one Dimarzio in each guitar (the neck slot in each has pickups from boutique builders). It actually worked out extremely well, though if you look closely you can see that the pickup covers are shaded a bit differently.

Edited by wankdeplank
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Every guitar has an inherent sound and requires a particular pickup to bring out the sound you are chasing. Never, have two guitars (even made out of the same woods), sounded the same to me.

 

Examples... I like a pickup with more mid-range when using Ash to compensate. My Alder Strat has a very full inherent tone so I require a pickup with articulation. My Les Paul without a maple cap sounds great with Burstbucker Pros, some find them harsh on the highs but without a maple cap, they are gold.

 

 

Welcome back, forum wrecker!

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Every guitar has an inherent sound and requires a particular pickup to bring out the sound you are chasing. Never, have two guitars (even made out of the same woods), sounded the same to me.

 

Examples... I like a pickup with more mid-range when using Ash to compensate. My Alder Strat has a very full inherent tone so I require a pickup with articulation. My Les Paul without a maple cap sounds great with Burstbucker Pros, some find them harsh on the highs but without a maple cap, they are gold.

 

 

Some guitars can be fairly predictable and some a real bastard to match. I usually make good choices predicting what might work well when I build a guitar, but a few wind up being radically different.

 

I have a DOT and I really wasn't impressed with the stock pickups. The logical solution might have been to get some good Gibson pickups used in an ES335. I Knew the stock pickups were pretty close to those and I wanted something a little more unique. I used to own a 60's Epi Riviera and was looking for a sound along those lines. I tried about 7 or more different sets including EMG. Dimarzio, Duncan, A number of GHS and Filteron type pickups. None were giving me the right semi hollowbody tones I've known from having owned several. Some were to hot, had too much midrange, too much bass, too thin.

 

I finally bought some full sized pickup adaptors and put Vintage Wound mini humbuckers in there and that was it. I got the Clarity, Drive, and overtones that sounded right for that guitar. It can clean up and jangle for chords and get smooth driven tones cranked along with endless sustain from the body resonation.

 

I suspect P90's which have a similar tone might sound good in that guitar too. I had a Moserite Celebrity for about 5 years and the pups in those were P90 like single coils that made that semi sounded really good. I've read many have used HB sized P90's in DOT's and liked the tone they get so I have another possible option to try if I want but I like the Mini's drive so I'll stick with those awhile. Ric toaster type pups might work well too, but you can spend allot of time and money chasing that dragons tail. Dots are a pain in the butt pulling the controls through the F hole to rewire too. to rewire too.

 

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Can you not go in and out through the treble pickup cavity on those guitars (like a 335)?

 

No. The Dots are semi hollowbody and have a wood plank of mahagony down the center. The Epi Riviera and Gibson ES335 also have the same wood plank build and the wiring is not accessable from the pup cavities. These guitars are closer to Les Pauls' original "Log" on many ways. The wings give some acoustic tone but the plank is around 4" wide to at least the stop bar tail piece. The pickup routes are virtually the same as any solid body.

 

I believe the Plank ends after the stop tail. Last time I was fiddling around wiring the pots in on the DOT I kept loosing a pot behind the stop bar area so the entire tail end is likely open. The stop bar is the key item however. It needs a solid block of wood to mount so the string tension doesn't pull it over.

 

The exception is a Riviera which uses a tail piece. It has a center plank but the "Frequensator" Tail piece seem to conduct more sound down to the hollow tail end so it has a little more acoustic tone then a Dot.

 

Epi Casino, on the other hand has a true hollow body interior. They produce a much louder acoustic tone as well. I have a generic version of a Casino an you can get to the wiring quite easily.

Edited by WRGKMC
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Gibson ES335 also have the same wood plank build and the wiring is not accessable from the pup cavities.

 

 

 

My ES335 (1966 "pencil neck") and all of the 335s I have ever worked on have an opening between the treble pickup cavity and the control cavity that is big enough to pull the entire wiring harness out of the guitar.

 

 

 

Most of the models I have worked on, however, are from the 60s and early 70s. Perhaps the newer ones are constructed differently.

 

 

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My ES335 (1966 "pencil neck") and all of the 335s I have ever worked on have an opening between the treble pickup cavity and the control cavity that is big enough to pull the entire wiring harness out of the guitar. Most of the models I have worked on, however, are from the 60s and early 70s. Perhaps the newer ones are constructed differently.

 

There were allot of different versions. The most common had the hard tail stop piece and wood block made of either mahogany or maple.

 

 

 

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Recently' date=' I took out a Fender Custom Shop 69 bridge pickup due to it screechy ice pick tone, I replaced it with a Schaller S6 ( 13.6k ohms) .... much better lows, lower mids, great upper mids and bearable highs ;) [/quote']

 

 

 

A steel base plate might cure the ills on your Custom Shop 69.

 

 

bplate2.jpg

 

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