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Long, Shallow, Wide, Narrow Tall, Small Sound Characteristics


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The highs from my system always pretty much sound the same no matter what kind of room we play. The low end however, varies quite a bit. In fact, in some places it varies quite a bit just based on where you stand.

 

So what I was wondering is if someone could give me a general rule of thumb for how LF frequencies are effected by things like:

 

 

 

My practice room appears to nearly cancel out the XLF's bottom end in a few places, and isn't nearly as pronounced as it is in most venues (low ceiling, 25' x 25' room, soft ceiling, hard walls).

 

I have one particular venue where the layout is: (High ceiling, narrow but long room ~35' x 75'). The bass is overly emphasized and must be equalized down quite a bit to prevent horrid rumble.

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The best I can describe it(and I am admittedly uneducated in the science of it),is in a boomy room ,the bass on all channels needs to come down.If you have a graphic eq on the mains(FOH).you need to cut the lower frequencies(and you should be able to leave the channel eqs alone in this situation) to compensate for the"boom of the room".I know what I mean even if I can't grammatically articulate it to others on the forum.

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I like playing hand drums, like djembes, during jam sessions, and a few years back I discovered that it was not only the corners that increase the bass (which I'm looking for with a small drum), but there are many different spots in the room where the bass is stronger/weaker. Based on that, if I have a low frequency sensitive instrument (or sub for that matter), I walk around the room with a drum in hand and listen for the places in the room that I can get a deeper, stronger bass.

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I walk around the room with a drum in hand and listen for the places in the room that I can get a deeper, stronger bass.

 

 

You certainly will.

 

I used to teach a class where I would play a 40 Hz tone and then switch to a 50 Hz tone at the same level. When I asked the class whether the level went up or down I'd get about a 50-50 response. That's because as the frequency changes so do the null points.

 

You'll get the most bass level up against walls and corners and everything else will just change as you move through the room. This is why it's about pointless to try to EQ a room below about 200 Hz if the ceiling isn't 20 feet tall or so. (assuming the ceiling height is the shortest dimension)

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