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Connecting iPod to single speaker


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I often want to just connect an iPod directly to my JBL Eon or PRX speakers (single input) so we can have music while I'm setting up or tearing down. I bought a Radial ProAV1 DI, which sums stereo to mono, but it's not working -- the volume varies on its own. Usually it's too soft, but sometimes too loud. I've used both an 1/8 to dual RCA cable as well as an 1/8 to 1/8 cable. I've tried both Mic and Line level settings on the speakers, and played with the volume on the iPod and sensitivity on the speakers, and still haven't had satisfactory results. The DI seems to work fine with my keyboard. Any ideas? Is there a level or impedance problem that doesn't work right with the transformer?

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Whirlwind Isopod - At around $50, it may be a bit pricey for your application, but this is the right way to do it. I own one and it works great. Way better than "$6" cable mentioned above, which I used to run to a DI. Just didn't get loud enough at times and doesn't sound as good. I use this to hook directly to a speaker for remote "cocktail hour" music and also to a channel in my mixer for break music.
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Quote Originally Posted by abzurd View Post
Whirlwind Isopod - At around $50, it may be a bit pricey for your application, but this is the right way to do it. I own one and it works great. Way better than "$6" cable mentioned above, which I used to run to a DI. Just didn't get loud enough at times and doesn't sound as good. I use this to hook directly to a speaker for remote "cocktail hour" music and also to a channel in my mixer for break music.
Isopod does look good. Sums to mono - and transforms to low Z balanced signal.

I just went and tried my $6 cord direct - from the shuffle to a powered speaker - and I will just say - it does "work" - seemed like I needed to turn everything "up" pretty far to get a robust full sound. I don't really remember that being the case when it is plugged into a channel on the mixer.
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Thanks everyone, good ideas. All those options are much cheaper than my DI and a little more compact. I usually run a mono mix anyway and it would be nice to be able to just use one channel on my mixer. I just sold my keyboard so maybe I'll sell the DI to pay for it.

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Quote Originally Posted by Rbts View Post
Isopod does look good. Sums to mono - and transforms to low Z balanced signal.

I just went and tried my $6 cord direct - from the shuffle to a powered speaker - and I will just say - it does "work" - seemed like I needed to turn everything "up" pretty far to get a robust full sound. I don't really remember that being the case when it is plugged into a channel on the mixer.
Yep. I have the same cable setup as well and it's OK if you have a mixer preamp to work off of, but may not have enough when plugged directly into a powered speaker. It depends on the speaker. Some powered speakers also have a "line and mic" level input switch.
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Quote Originally Posted by Rbts View Post
I just went and tried my $6 cord direct - from the shuffle to a powered speaker - and I will just say - it does "work" - seemed like I needed to turn everything "up" pretty far to get a robust full sound. I don't really remember that being the case when it is plugged into a channel on the mixer.
The reason for this is because connecting the L&R outputs together in a Y cable loads down the headphone or line driver output well below what it was designed for. You will lose level (due to buildout resistors) or cause low frequency distortion (from current limiting), the results will be different depending on the type of driver used. The I-pods have used several different configurations.

A proper summing device is the best way to go.
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Quote Originally Posted by agedhorse View Post
The reason for this is because connecting the L&R outputs together in a Y cable loads down the headphone or line driver output well below what it was designed for. You will lose level (due to buildout resistors) or cause low frequency distortion (from current limiting), the results will be different depending on the type of driver used. The I-pods have used several different configurations.

A proper summing device is the best way to go.
Such as the Isopod?
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