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DigiTech RP250 Modeling Guitar Processor


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Anderton wrote:

You can then select REAMP VIA USB as an input, and send the dry signal from the GNX4 into an open channel on your multitrack.

Wow, that is a really cool feature, and knowing this may have prompted patchcon's question.

 

But no such feature exists in the RP250, at least in the present firmware version. I should remind everyone that although the RP250 is the beneficiary of the AudioDNA2 technology, shared by higher-end DigiTech processors, we are talking about a $150 box, so some of these more esoteric and high-end recording features may have been scrapped to keep the price down.

 

But keep in mind that in addition to interfacing with a computer via USB for DAW recording, the the RP250 makes excellent use of the X-Edit 2.0 editor/librarian. That should make most computer-using guitarists (myself included) happy.

 

Also, remember that sound goes both ways as far as the USB connection in the RP250. You can work on a multitrack project using just your laptop (loaded with virtual instruments and effect plug-ins), guitar, and RP250. Just route the multitrack audio back through the RP250 and monitor off of headphones. You can jam along live this way, too.

 

This is especially handy if you're traveling and want to minimize the gear you must tote to record.

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It reminds me of the pointless battles I have with my wife about using keystrokes instead of the mouse. (She uses a mouse for everything -- to Save, Print, even for the highlighted OK in a dialog box. Don't get me started. ) I don't bother to fight it anymore, because if it gets the job done, why argue? Different strokes, and all that.

 

Off topic but....

 

Your wife is most likely right. The mouse is almost always faster than using keyboard shortcuts or even a trackball. Using your mouse may not 'feel' faster, but it usually is faster. I've read through most of the Ask Tog website, which is run by a former Apple UI design guy. He's done a lot of research in this area and talks quite a bit about it if you take to time to read through most of his site.

 

On topic...

 

So the GNX1-4 units also have the AudioDNA2 chips? So these new units are just lower priced versions? Or have they improved on the GNX's? How well doyou think they compare to the Pod Xt?

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patchcon wrote:

I believe the term is "hardware plug-in"

It is indeed a great concept, patchcon! Wish I'd thought of it (and copyrighted it, and licensed it, and collected royalties on it :)).

 

USB control over hardware devices is definitely a trend I want to see continue. But the Lexicon MX400 is $500 (and the MX200, which also offers this feature, is $200); the RP250 costs a buck and a half.

 

And remember, in the spirit of comparing apples to apples, the MX is a rack unit, and doesn't provide an expression pedal, whereas the RP250 is a performance-based guitar processor with some computer goodies tossed in for good measure.

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DigiTech has posted their demo of the RP250 in a neat presentation:

 

http://www.digitech.com/RP250Demo

 

You can select either the Pedal View or the X-Edit View to step through all 60 presets, but I suggest the X-Edit View.

 

This allows you to see the parameters, and is much more revealing as to how a sound is built. Remember, there are adjustable parameters in X-Edit that you can't accesss from the processor's front panel, and this shows the parameters and their settings.

 

There's some nice guitar work going on here! Some of my faves:

 

01 PLXDRV

03 SOLDLY

06 RECTFD

07 STACK

09 PRIDE

14 BASMAN

20 CHKPKN

23 GREASR

28 ACOUST

31 SWELL

40 KILLER

41 OCTDVD

57 LEDZEP

60 SATCH

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Hello everyone,

 

I'm currently looking for a mfx unit and the RP250 (or possibly RP350) and the zoom G7 are on my short list. This review thread has been a great source of information.

 

I've gone to the Digitech web site and checked out the preset demo and, like most preset patches, the it seems that the gains are cranked and the sounds are dripping wet with effects.

 

My question is to those of you who have worked with the RP250 for a while. Just how good (or bad) does this thing sound when you dial in your own patches? Can you get a nice, warm, smooth overdrive sound from the 250?

 

Thanks in advance,

 

BrewBuck72

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I tend to agree with BrewBuck72 that most presets are tweazed out to show their stuff in a crowded, noisy music store showroom with a bunch of attention-deficit-afflicted tire-kickers pawing their product.

 

But I think in this case, the RP250 has two things going for it:

 

1. The new AudioDNA2 chip, which is faster, more efficient, and just better than previous technology.

 

2. The additional tone-shaping power that editing through X-Edit 2.0 gives you.

 

What BrewBuck72 is asking for is still a personal, subjective call. So check out the Zoom and the RP250, but since this is a forum on the RP250, make sure you consider the two points above when you audition the units. I don't know that you'll have the benefit of trying out the RP250 with the editor (you'd need a laptop hooked up to it), but if you're going to be living with this thing, X-Edit 2.0 is indispensable and might just tip the scales for you.

 

But to answer the question, Does the RP250 give you nice, smooth, warm overdrive? I say yes. And subtle and nuanced and dynamically responsive, too.

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Jon,

 

Thanks for the response. I agree, the concept of a good tone is very subjective. Maybe I should have phrased my question differently. I know that when I go try one of these things out, I probably won't have the time to dial in the tone I want so I was looking for feedback from users who have had a chance to really do some tweaking.

 

With respect to the "artist" patches in the preset demo, I was dissapointed with the Hendrix (too much fuzz), Clapton (sounds like he was playing in the next room), and Zeppelin (just plain weak) sounds. Has anyone been able to dial in artist tones they consider to be better than the presets?

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Are these units true-bypass, or is your signal always A/D'ed and D/A'ed?

Yes, the RP250 employs a true bypass. Page 2 of the manual states, "The presets can be bypassed via a true analog bypass circuit for a clean, unprocessed guitar signal."

 

(See a related discussion begun by Anderton on 10/30/06, subject "Reamp via USB.")

 

Forumites: The pdf of the RP250 manual is online at DigiTech's website, so if you have specific questions, download the manual and use the word-search function (the binoculars icon) in Adobe Acrobat to find the desired subject.

 

http://www.digitech.com/products/RP_newpgs/rp250.htm

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keelin wrote:

1.
i have a gnx4 - will my patches work on a rp250?
2.
is there an adaptor?
3.
is there a warp function on the x edit for the 250?
4.
i have protracks (came with gnx4) for recording - can that be used for recording with the rp250?

1. No, the RP250 uses an entirely different DSP architecture (as well as newly designed amp and effects models) that prevents converting presets directly between the two devices.

 

2. Yes, a power adapter is included with the RP250.

 

3. No, the warp feature is only available in the GNX products.

 

4. Yes, you can download and install the ASIO driver and use the RP250 with Pro Tracks as well as any other ASIO-compatible recording software.

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Originally posted by BrewBuck72

Jon,


Thanks for the response. I agree, the concept of a good tone is very subjective. Maybe I should have phrased my question differently. I know that when I go try one of these things out, I probably won't have the time to dial in the tone I want so I was looking for feedback from users who have had a chance to really do some tweaking.


With respect to the "artist" patches in the preset demo, I was dissapointed with the Hendrix (too much fuzz), Clapton (sounds like he was playing in the next room), and Zeppelin (just plain weak) sounds. Has anyone been able to dial in artist tones they consider to be better than the presets?

 

 

Just to echo your observation and Jon's sentiment here, I agree that much of the patches are overdone. I have a MIM Fat Strat I installed Lone Star Strat Pickups (PGPlus in bridge). They are pretty hot. I find the EQ too high or tinny on many patches. I used Xedit 2.0 (free download - Digitech), and developed my own sound that I feel shows off my original tone better with a just a little bite. I don't see a good rhythm/country preset among them all. Adjusting this myself convinced me that for a DIGITAL effects system, I don't think you can get better!!!

I must admit, though, Jon's PRS McCarty sounds GREAT under the #4 Blues setting.. better than the one used on Digitech's site. THAT is the sound I'm looking for... Gonna go tweak that one tonight for my guitar..

 

 

I had considered the Zoom G7.1 'ut' version because of the tube preamp.. The demo available is too muddled to hear the guitar alone, but everyone I've seen posts it sounds great.. Too expensive for me though. At half the price, (and a better size IMO), I think you get much more for your money from the RP250.

The TRUE bypass is fantastic as well, since you can compare before & after, and balance the overall volume better. I bought the Line6 Floor Pod, but returned it a few days later. It's $50.00 more, too simple (not much for the money), and doesn't sound as good as the RP250.

 

Thank you so much Jon, for the time you spent and careful descriptions of the functions and sounds that you get out of the RP250. You've painted an accurate picture with your words (and of course sounds) of what this beauty can do. After the RP200, I didn't think I would buy another Digitech product. My mind has beend changed and I'm a happy customer.

 

Later -Jeff

 

Here's a patch I created for a Strat #2 position...

 

http://www.digitech.com/soundcomm/guitar_view_patch.asp?productid=226&patch_id=10547

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NewPedalBoard.jpg

 

Here's my current board setup with my RP 200. I'm never going to connect it to my PC to record etc. I love the way I use it now and it sounds great through both my Crate XT120R and my Valve Junior Head with Crate 412 cab. I have had my RP 200 going on 6 years now and am thrilled with it. My question is with the new upgrades of the RP250, if I were to upgrade would I notice a great deal of difference in the sound quality.

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First, to JEFF2EARTH:

 

Nice job on the patch! I downloaded it, and really like what you've done with the compression, EQ, and judicious application of ambient effects. Good documentation, too!

 

If you record a segment using this, please post it here. I play country rock, too, and your patch immediately made sense when I put my Strat in the #2 position.

 

A word of explanation: JEFF2EARTH has contributed a preset to DigiTech's online community, which is a forum where guitarists can swap presets and discuss their findings. JEFF2EARTH provides a direct link to his preset, but you can get there this way, too:

 

Digitech.com/soundcomm

 

Guitar Products --> RP Products --> RP250.

 

* * *

 

To mikesr1963:

 

Nice pedalboard! Thanks for posting the photo (a bit out of focus to these eyes, but I can make out most of it).

 

In answer to your question: Even if you never hook up your RP250 to a computer, you might consider upgrading. First of all, the footprint and layout match your existing RP200, so no board or brain modifications are required.

 

Also, consider we ARE talking about electronic technology, and a company as smart and progressive and hardworking as DigiTech will certainly have availed themselves of faster and more powerful processors in the six years since you've been using the RP200. But this is how it is with any technology -- computers, cars, cellphones, etc.

 

My advice: Write down the parameters of a couple of your favorite presets on the RP200. Go to your local music store and try to tweak the RP250 to match your existing sound. You'll have to make some decisions, as the sound architecture is not identical, but you should be able to get close. Decide if the new sounds you're hearing are enough of an improvement to consider upgrading. As I said, the fact that the RP200 and RP250 are similar in form factor and navigation may be an advantage in your case.

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Thanks for the reply. I backed off the verb a bit and reposted on Digitech's site.. Here is a before & after (using the RP250's bypass for the 'before') of a short strum & then riff.. I've been strumming my Gibson EC10 Acoustic Electric so long just playing rhythm & chords, I'm starting to see how sloppy I've become here.. This pedal inspires me to keep playing my Fender Strat!!

I've found that putting this FatStrat 'voice' next to the RP250's factory SOLDLY (solo-delay) in succession works great when toggling from rhythm to solo riffs all within the same song. The nice gritty feel from the solo preset is nicely compatible with the EQ settings of my FatStrat - inasmuch as keeping the shrillness of the highs down anyway..

 

Here's my little sample..

 

Oooops, Size limitations here not working. Just posting the 'riff'..

 

Not sure why, but this saves as a *.php file. You must rename it 'riff.mp3' file to get it to work. . -Jeff

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You must rename it 'riff.mp3' file to get it to work.

Actually, you just have to rename the extension (the 3 letters after the dot) to "mp3." Then the mp3 icon is restored, and you can open it with the mp3 player of your choice (iTunes, Windows Media Player, etc.).

 

I like your riff, Jeff -- crunchy-clean, with just a touch of "hair." What's interesting is that I recorded a riff with the same settings (mine is wetter than yours, because I left your original ambient settings intact), and came up with the slightly more gnarly sounding riff here:

 

Jeff's Fat Strat Preset.mp3

 

Since we're both recording direct, it must be the difference in our pickups. Weird how the same setting in the multi-effects processor can sound so different, depending on the guitar -- even we're both using an HSS-configured Strat in the #2 position.

 

Different strokes for different folks! This preset would sound good with some single-note riffs, too, or a mix of chordal playing and single-note passages.

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Yes, even though Seymour Duncan's website says the PSPlus pickup is not available for 'retail', I ordered a new one off Ebay.. They describe the difference with the original here from their website..

 

 

Q.What's the difference between your Pearly Gates pickup and the Pearly Gates Plus on a Lone Star Strat®?

The Pearly Gates is rather different than the "Pearly Gates Plus" that is on the Lone Star StratTM. The Pearly Gates Plus is only available on that guitar and not made for retail sales. The main difference in these pickups is that a Pearly Gates has Alnico II magnets, while the Pearly Gates Plus has Alnico V magnets. Alnico V magnets tend to give a brighter, glassier tone, while Alnico II magnets tend to have a warmer, rounder, more mid-rangier tone. The closest pickup available in our regular line to a Pearly Gates Plus is a '59 Model with 4-conductor cable. The '59 is an Alnico V pickup with a wind very close to that of the Pearly Gates Plus. The '59 usually comes in single conductor cable, but it can be ordered with the 4-Conductor wiring option.

 

What are the specs on the Pearly Gates Plus?

We do not list the specifications of the Pearly Gates Plus in our Tone Chart because this pickup is not sold retail and can only be found in the Lone Star Strat®. For comparison purposes, here are the specs:

Hum canceling: Yes

DC Resistance: 8.65k

Magnets: Alnico 5 bar

Resonant Peak: 6.62khz

4-conductor wiring

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

I guess the name sold me. There is no recorded comparison on Seymour's site to compare as all the other pickups have because they don't sell it retail.. The fact is you can't have everything in one guitar. .. but if I have only one choice (as I do presently), the HSS is the most versatile and I love the setup.. It is amazing how really different and unique each guitars pickups can bring to the table of sound! Thanks for your mp3. Great sound!

 

"This preset would sound good with some single-note riffs, too, or a mix of chordal playing and single-note passages"

 

Good observation. That's really what I was looking for because I play in a small band at church with just one other guitarist, and don't really have a good enough rhythm foundation to be 'solo-only'. Now, hopefully, I won't lose any tone running it through the P.A. system. Yet ANOTHER variable in tone nuances.. I'll find out tomorrow.

 

P.S. Hey Jon, I just listened again to your 'boogie' cut and wanted to clarify how you used the AMP/MIXER switch on your recording. Mine was set to mixer. (I'm secretly hoping your's was set to amp, so I won't be as jealous about the sound difference ;).

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Originally posted by Jon Chappell

I've been wondering that myself. My own experience, before coming to the Harmony Central Forums, is that guitarists into stompboxes and floor-based multi-effects processors don't really work with or know all that much about editor/librarians. (But HC forumites have a higher gear-literacy rate compared to most other fourm frequenters, which has got me thinking.)


Under many circumstances, it's okay not to use an editor to create sounds, as knob-tweaking guitarists can get around a front panel pretty dang quickly, and nothing is lost except some efficiency. Why convert a knob-twiddler to a computer user, all things being equal? It reminds me of the pointless battles I have with my wife about using keystrokes instead of the mouse. (She uses a mouse for
everything
-- to Save, Print, even for the highlighted OK in a dialog box. Don't get me started.
:)
) I don't bother to fight it anymore, because if it gets the job done, why argue? Different strokes, and all that.


But that's not the case with the RP250 and X-Edit 2.0.


If you don't use X-Edit, you're missing out on editable parameters, hidden features, and the true sound-shaping powers that the unit holds in its brain.
That's just plain stoopid. I think DigiTech should supply an RP250 workstation outfitted with a PC and X-Edit 2.0 to every Guitar Center in the country!


So what about it, fellow fretmeisters? Do you use an editor/librarian for your effects? Do real guitarists have to resort to computers to get their sound? Do you think it's right for DigiTech and others to make some features of their effects accessible
only
through a computer? Do you think computers steal your soul?


Let me hear about it.

 

 

I won't consider a multifx unit if it doesn't have a decent editor/librarian......which brings up the question........both my zoom g7 and my old Johnson j station's editors interfaced thru a midi cable. Th Zoom uses a usb port for recording.....X-Edit must interface thru the USB connection, can you also record while using the editor?

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JEFF2EARTH originally posted:

P.S. Hey Jon, I just listened again to your 'boogie' cut and wanted to clarify how you used the AMP/MIXER switch on your recording. Mine was set to mixer. (I'm secretly hoping your's was set to amp, so I won't be as jealous about the sound difference.

 

I did check the back of the unit, and the Mixer setting is selected -- scout's honor! :)

 

But don't be jealous; I just bought the pickups. You wrote the preset. :D

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wander2koriginally posted:

Th Zoom uses a usb port for recording.....X-Edit must interface thru the USB connection, can you also record while using the editor?

 

Yes, you can record while using X-Edit, but X-Edit is a stand-alone application, not a VST plug-in. I just keep both my multi-track recorder (lately Cubase 4) and X-Edit open at the same time and switch back and forth.

 

USB is a great improvement over MIDI for those wanting to use an editor in an audio-only environment.

 

USB uses one cable (it's bi-directional, unlike MIDI, which requires two cables for in and out signals), the cables are cheap and readily available (they sell them at my local pharmacy), and every computer comes with USB ports. (With MIDI, you have to connect a peripheral.)

 

Heck, if you're really cheap, you don't even need a dedicated USB cable; you can cannibalize one from your printer while you record.

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