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Summer NAMM Rumors????


tangerine
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"The announcement is a sign of the decline of the music trade show as an event to get excited about."

well maybe if they cut it back to one NAAM a year it might be more exciting. it would also help if the bigger companies could come up with something other than repackaged gear or controllers. also giving more press coverage to smaller / botique companies would help too.

due to the economy, NI is probably losing allot of sales to warez, not to mention their catalog is pretty bloated. it's not any fun to show off version 2.0.5 or the new skin..:idk:

it was bound to happen sooner or later though, the industry is at a saturation point. until some new interface or computer techniology comes out we probabaly won't see anything jaw dropping for a long time..

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img01.jpg

 

Casio Privia PX-330 (theres also a new PX-130 and PX-730)

 

This is now on the Casio Japan site, should be announced for US and UK soon

 

88 keys

 

AIF sound source

 

3 sensor scaling hammer action keyboards

 

Touch response (sensitivity selective 3 stage/off)

 

250 built in sounds

 

180 built-in rhythms +10 user rhythm

 

Automatic accompaniment function

 

Digital effects: reverb, chorus, DSP

 

Acoustic resonance system

 

Song recording function: 16 tracks approximately 10,000 notes per song, real time sound recording/playback

 

Metronome: 0, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 rhythm (tempo adjustment possibility)

 

Lesson function (right hand/left hand part on/off function)

 

Duet function

 

Layer/split

 

Registration (total 96 set: 12 set ×8 banks)

 

Music setting (300 pre-setting +50 user)

 

One touch setting (180 sets)

 

Automatic harmonization

 

Tune (pre-setting scale): Average law +16 type

 

Stretch tuning (on/off)

 

Octave shift: ±2 octave

 

Tuning control

 

Pitch bend wheel

 

Pedal: Terminal ×2 (damper, sosutenuto change), attachment pedal ×1, 3 pedal units

 

Half pedal (damper) function

 

Screen: Back light equipped full dot liquid crystal picture

 

MIDI function: GM level 1 conformity *1

 

SD memory card slot

 

Panel lock

 

Speaker: [13cm/6cm (rectangle)] ×2 + 5cm×2 (2 way speakers)

 

Output: 8W+8W

 

Input/output terminal: Headphone (3.5mm stereo mini- jack) ×2 and LINE IN (L/MONO and R), LINE OUT (L/MONO and R), pedal ×2 (damper, software/[sosutenuto] change), connectors for 3 these pedal unit, USB2, MIDI IN/OUT and external power source (DC 12V)

 

Power source: AC power source

 

Size (width depth— height):

1,322×286×135 mm

 

Weight: 11.6 kg

 

Still hoping they'll release a new 76 key arranger that improves on the WK-3800

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well maybe if they cut it back to one NAAM a year it might be more exciting. it would also help if the bigger companies could come up with something other than repackaged gear or controllers. also giving more press coverage to smaller / botique companies would help too.


Or, they could tie it more to the other sidefields. NAMM did an experimental summer show here in the Twin Cities back in 2004; they tied it in with the music education business. It had good turnout and good buzz about it; yet for some reason they decided the idea wasn't worth expanding on.

due to the economy, NI is probably losing allot of sales to warez, not to mention their catalog is pretty bloated. it's not any fun to show off version 2.0.5 or the new skin..
:idk:


NI's not losing any more to the warez people than they were before the economy tanked. As far as I know, they've had a fairly profitable year.

The economics of doing NAMM in NI's case can be pretty horrendous. This last show, I saw probably ten or fifteen people from Berlin there. So, we have airfare, hotel, etc. for ten people for six days (a day before and a day after the show). Add to that the cost of a booth, and you're getting up into six figures pretty quickly. They haven't had a booth at the Messe for a couple years; NAMM was bound to follow suit.

ew

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By and large though, NI's seems to be a completely reasonable and modern outlook. May they fail miserably.

THE COST OF NAMM:

 

• A decent high-traffic space on the floor—$200,000 or more

• Airfare, hotel stay, food, etc. for all employees attending—$Tens of thousands

• Designing and creating tradeshow booth—$Tens of thousands

• Storing, transporting, building, repairing, maintaining, and tear down of said tradeshow booth—$Tens of thousands

• Meals, drinks, sponsoring shows, and other stuff spent impressing dealers and distributors—$Tens of thousands

• Net loss on opened product (A-stock vs. B-stock)—$Thousands

• Net loss from sales/support staff being at trade show instead of selling and supporting gear—$Thousands

• Net loss from staff preparing for NAMM (or staff whose entire job is to prepare for tradeshows)—$Hundreds of thousands

 

WHAT PEOPLE THINK NAMM IS FOR:

 

• Showing off new products

• Partying with people you haven't seen since last NAMM

• Getting to annoy the manufacturers face-to-face with your personal tech questions and retarded feature requests

• Banging so-Cal hookers

 

WHAT NAMM IS REALLY FOR:

 

• Attracting new dealers to carry your new or small product line (which doesn't apply to established MI companies)

• Building distribution networks in new geographical areas for your new or small product line (which doesn't apply to established MI companies)

• Begging your existing dealers to place huge pre-orders for your new products (which rarely happens anymore)

• Convincing the public that the economy isn't killing your company (because, well, you can afford a nice booth at NAMM)

 

If the four things above don't apply, why spend hundreds of thousands (or MILLIONS) on NAMM, especially when it's a huge pain in the ass? If you have a budget, wouldn't that budget best be served by developing better products? Or hiring twenty people? Or increasingly common these days, not firing twenty people?

 

NI made a smart move IMO.

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TAW
: why does "
Begging your existing dealers to place huge pre-orders for your new products
" rarely happen anymore?


Better "just-in-time" systems have improved inventory control?

A number of reasons:

 

• Dealers are broke—especially smaller mom-and-pop stores. They're not going to order ten of your Gizmo Synth 4000 at the show. If it seems like the public likes it and will buy it, they may place a small order a few weeks later. As I understand it, Sweetwater is one of very few companies that still places big orders at NAMM.

 

• Because dealers are broke, the NAMM specials—Order before Sunday and get free shipping!—are generally extended to the few weeks after NAMM... Which means more dealers stop ordering at NAMM.

 

• Online ordering is extremely simple nowadays

 

• Your aforementioned inventory control :)

 

• Dealers can gauge public perception of a product from forums such as this one the first day of NAMM. Since places like HC do mostly hating and whining, dealers are very wary of placing orders for products that garner "LOL! What a piece of crap!", even if it's a cool-as-hell product.

 

• Free shipping is less of a motivator when your 256-track megastudio fits on a CD-ROM

 

• Since NAMM's become more popular with non-dealers (e.g. end users, wannabe rock star kids, etc.), there are more distractions and it's harder to set up dealer meetings. That's part of the reason NAMM's been trying to restrict entry to mostly buyers, press people, and manufacturers.

 

• Online information's so prevalent these days, a dealer can simply pop online, download the spec sheet, see that the Gizmo Synth 4000 is only 6-note polyphonic, and say "Sorry, not interested!" A decade ago, he'd find out after a customer complained.

 

• There's not much point in seeing a piece of software in the flesh when the dealer can simply download the demo

 

But mainly, the dealers are hurting.

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• Dealers can gauge public perception of a product from forums such as this one the first day of NAMM. Since places like HC do mostly hating and whining, dealers are very wary of placing orders for products that garner "LOL! What a piece of crap!", even if it's a cool-as-hell product.

 

My suspicions were correct, Hai Guyz is a black whole that started by dragging down KSS, now the entire music industry, and soon enough, the entire universe :lol:

 

But seriously, manufacturers need to take these forums with a grain of salt, especially if their product is kinda niche. The online community is extremely fickle.

Come to think of it, Roland probably got itself in trouble with the Fantom G by putting in things for specific users and forgetting to look at the big picture. That's probably just one example of the blind leading the blind...

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• Dealers can gauge public perception of a product from forums such as this one the first day of NAMM. Since places like HC do mostly hating and whining, dealers are very wary of placing orders for products that garner "LOL! What a piece of crap!", even if it's a cool-as-hell product.



if only the manufacturers paid this much attention...

WHERES THE LINNDRUM 2 LEBOWSKI!!!!

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But seriously, manufacturers need to take these forums with a grain of salt, especially if their product is kinda niche. The online community is
extremely
fickle.

Agreed, but I'm talking about dealers. Dealers used to order stuff they thought was cool. Now they buy nothing (at least at NAMM), because nothing's cool. Online, everything is lame. Everything is a failure. Everything is "what were they thinking!!!111EleventyLOL!!"

 

You know, Lamborghinis are worthless because they don't have four cupholders. I know because I read it online.

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All the same, dealers also need to know their market and forums might not represent that market correctly. Right after the SH-201 came out, it was universally hated, and it sill is dissed by the majority of the online community. But I know it sells well.

 

The online community killed other good synths like the Fusion, and Roland might be having board meetings to see if it's even worth it to stay in the workstation market anymore.

 

Though I have to say that if it wasn't for the forums, synths like the Andromeda would have ceased production 5 years ago...

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I agree...and a great way to fit in if you're just getting into online forums is to use well worn phrases like "it just doesn't cut through the mix" and "it's not a bad board, but the piano's suck" (in fact, just generally cut down every piano ever made...even acoustic ones just in case) a lot. People will think you REALLY know what you're talking about! Then pick some obscure board that like maybe 10 people used back in the 80's and heap tons of praise on it.

 

Dealers need to stay off of forums.

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All the same, dealers also need to know their market and forums might not represent that market correctly. Right after the SH-201 came out, it was universally hated, and it sill is dissed by the majority of the online community. But I know it sells well.

Hmm... I haven't noticed notable hatred for the SH-201 at all. I notice a TON of hatred for the MicroKorg tho'.

The online community killed other good synths like the Fusion, and Roland might be having board meetings to see if it's even worth it to stay in the workstation market anymore.

Why? The Fantom-G spanks the Korg M3, feature-wise, and is selling better than the M3, at least according to a friend who works at GC Corporate. At least Roland has other products to keep it healthy. Korg has... the MicroKorg?

 

I kid, I kid. I like Korg.

Though I have to say that if it wasn't for the forums, synths like the Andromeda would have ceased production 5 years ago...

My start-up MI company will most likely fail because I'll be a complete asshole to anyone who knocks my product(s). :evil:

 

:D

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The Fantom-G spanks the Korg M3, feature-wise, and is selling better than the M3, at least according to a friend who works at GC Corporate.

 

Different story over here. I went to a major Musical Instrument outlet to view a Nord recently and the 'keys and synth' dept manager told me the M3 was the biggest seller along with the M50 and Juno D.

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Different story over here. I went to a major Musical Instrument outlet to view a Nord recently and the 'keys and synth' dept manager told me the M3 was the biggest seller along with the M50 and Juno D.

Hence, "GC Corporate". As in, which ones are selling chain-wide.

 

I do hear the M50's doing quite well tho'.

 

Of course, it's all anecdotal evidence...

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Hmm... I haven't noticed notable hatred for the SH-201 at all. I notice a TON of hatred for the MicroKorg tho'.

 

And yet the MicroKorg is probably the best selling synth since the 80s...

But I've read threads here and especially on other more "vintage-oriented" forums completely dissing the 201 as a toy and saying anyone who buys one just wants to play the sequencer and has absolutely no talent.

 

Why? The Fantom-G spanks the Korg M3, feature-wise, and is selling better than the M3, at least according to a friend who works at GC Corporate. At least Roland has other products to keep it healthy. Korg has... the MicroKorg? I kid, I kid. I like Korg.

 

Korg probably lost a bit to Roland on the design of the M3. But the Fantom G has GOT to beat the M3, it's almost a grand more expensive (street price is usually 2699 for the M3-88 and 3499 for the G8).

I'm sure Roland is actually getting their investment back. But I'm saying, if they read the forums, they'll think the G8 is a failure.

And sound-wise it doesn't really have that much on the M3, not to mention, the M3 gives you 3 free expansions on the Korg website, while the ARX cards are just way too expensive... not to mention the touchscreen... so the forums do have a reason to complain. Yet the G still sells, proving my theory that the forums are a small percentage of the market and aren't as good a picture as some people will claim it is.

And I do think the G might have been a bit too oriented towards what forum geeks wanted 4 years ago.

 

My start-up MI company will most likely fail because I'll be a
complete asshole
to anyone who knocks my product(s).
:evil:

:D

 

Hey, it's called "street credibility" baby :evil:

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