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Cabinet volume and dampening material


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Given that any set of drivers are designed to work within a calculated internal box size/volume, what are the effects of the dampening material? Much (all?) of the material I've seen is in no way acoustically transparent. The presence of this material must have some effect on the the volume. Yes........No ?

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The damping material in the box works on the adiabatic principle.  Basically it absorbs heat and so in that sense the internals of the baox think thay have a larger mass of air than they really do. they also help to defuse 1/4 wave reflections within the box.

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dboomer wrote:

 

 

The damping material in the box works on the adiabatic principle.  Basically it absorbs heat and so in that sense the internals of the baox think thay have a larger mass of air than they really do. they also help to defuse 1/4 wave reflections within the box.

 

Fascinating, would not have guessed about the perceived volume issue, knew about the standing waves. Are certain types of dampening material better than others at "fooling" the box? 

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Throwing caution to the wind, I'm going to post in a thread where both dBoomer and agedhorse have already weighed in... I'm either brave or foolish - probably the latter.

I've heard rumours that Yorkville decided not to dampen some of their passive speakers in the  Elite line, even though a judicious use and placement of dampening might have solved some of the 400hz bump that many of the Elite cabs apparently have. The reason they decided not to do so, was to gain a few dB in volume. I can in no way verify this, and I probably read it on the web - so of course it's true!

I can say however, that I purchased a couple of Yorkville M160's used, years ago. After a gig or two of use, I decided they just didn't sound right and opened them up. There was foam rubber everywhere, and it didn't look like a company job. So I removed the foam from everywhere but the back of the cabs. They sounded much better, although they do have that midrange bump, but they also seemed to have more volume. Of course, no test equipment was used in the filming of that assumption.

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dboomer wrote:

 

 

The damping material in the box works on the adiabatic principle.  Basically it absorbs heat and so in that sense the internals of the baox think thay have a larger mass of air than they really do. they also help to defuse 1/4 wave reflections within the box.

 

Sort of, the damping material transfers the energy from sound into heat when vibrated. 

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