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Synth used on Steve Miller's "Fly Like An Eagle"?

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Sorry, I don't have the answer, I'm just sitting here slack-jawed, because I was going to ask this very question yesterday. Seriously.

 

Separated at birth, or something.

 

:D

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Isn't that the song with the big synth intro? If that's the one it's a Roland Jupiter 4 (at least on the intro).

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Hey idiotboy thats really quite strange, maybe we were::D "Synchronicity", like that Police song huh?

 

Joe, are you sure that it is a Jupiter 4? Or does it just sound like one to your ears?

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I thought this song came out about 2 years prior to the Jupiter.

 

I could be wrong: I also thought everything from the 70s was done on an ARP2600! :rolleyes:

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there's a sorta "do-daleee-doo-deal-dal-dalee-dooo-dOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOeeeeeeeeee"

thing in there.

my $ would be on the arp too, but i've seen miller performance videos from the time period and seen no 2600.

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Steve was using some sort of Roland synth, not a JP4 (too early). One of the SH series probably.

 

At the time, Rolands (and Korgs) were considered to be toys compared to Moogs and ARPs. How opinions have changed!

 

As for the "overlapping" sounds, most of it is tape echo.

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man, not much luck with Google either. best i could find was being credited for playing 'synthesizer' or (when i typed in Roland) 'Roland organ'. couldn't find any real ties to Roland, ARP or Moog for that matter...

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I thought anyone could easily figure this one out. I'm not a Miller fan so I really don't care. I had always heard (twice, maybe) it was an ARP. But, c'mon. It was 1976. How many options were there?

 

Sequencer? Why? Any base-competent keyboard player can easily play this (then, not these days).

 

Keyboard players back then actually used their fingers on those black and white things.

 

Overlapping? Tape delay (hint: 1976).

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I heard it was an ARP too. Odyssey perhaps? It also reminds me of the synth solo in "Any colour you like", strangely enough, which it undoubtably an ems synthi a.

As others have said, that delay is probably a tape delay like the Roland Space Echo, it sounds creamy like that.

 

That song has always been one of those ones where, if I heard it randomly on the radio or something, I always have to pay attention for the synth solo.

When I was a kid it used to give me shivers.

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Funny, I've always thought it was either a Mini or modular Moog. It sounds like a Moog to me, as do the synth tracks on the rest of the album.

 

dB

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I recall an interview back in the day where Steve said he used a Roland synth. I remember it pretty clearly (even if it was 30 years ago) because it was unusual at the time to NOT use an ARP or Moog. In fact I don't think I knew what a Roland was!

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...Roland huh? Well, in 1976, there was this guy.....

 

roland_system700.jpg

 

 

 

The System 700 consists of the Main Console (pictured center), the Keyboard Controller, and five optional "blocks" (pictured above surrounding Main Console). A complete system as pictured above has a total of 47 modules (see Tech. Specs for modules info). Most System 700s were sold in the following configuration blocks:

 

"Block 1" (Main Console): This is the Heart of the System, and it contains all the basic modules necessary for a professional system. It has 3 VCOs, 2 VCFs, 2 VCAs, 2 LFOs, 2 ADSR egs, Noise, Ring Mod, Voltage Processor, S/H, Envelope Follower, "Integrater" (Lag Processor), Mixer, 2 X 5 multiples, Headphone Monitor Module, and an Output Module, which includes Stereo VUs, a six-position test-tone, Phase Shifter, Spring Reverb, and voltage controlled Panning. Most common module connections (power, cv, gate) are made internally for easier patching.

 

"Block 2" (Keyboard Controller): The 61-key two-voice Keyboard with Portamento and Pitchbend controls.

 

"Block 3" (Sequencer): a 3 X 12 step sequencer with Pulse Shaper, Clock Oscillator, and Series / Parallel output sections.

 

"Block 4" (VCO Bank): 6 VCOs, a dual ADSR envelope generator, LFO, Sample and Hold, 2 X 5 Multiples, and a small Mixer.

 

"Block 5" (VCF/VCA Bank): 2 VCFs, 3 VCAs, 2 dual ADSR envelope generators, 2 X 5 Multiples, and a Gate Delay.

 

"Block 6" (Interface/Mixer): a Frequency-to-Voltage Converter Interface, a VCA, 9-channel Audio Mixer, and a Fixed Filter Bank.

 

"Block 7" (Phase Shifter/Audio Delay): a 2-channel Phase Shifter and a 2-channel Audio Delay, 4 input Analog Switch, and a (1X12, 1X4, 1X8, 3X4) multiple.

Blocks 3 through 7 were options and could be arranged by the original owners in any way. Roland also released a Lab version, the "Laboratory System 700", the size of one lower wing cabinet with 3 VCOs, ring mod, VCA, mixer, LFO, Sample & Hold, Dual Envelope Generator, and VCF. Full Systems can cost as much as $18,000 and the Lab System is between $3,500 to $4,000!

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ask Seal.

 

his cover of Fly Like An Eagle sounds identical.

 

i'll also add that there is a generous about of tape delay on the sound, and that i don't see any way it could be a Moog. it doesn't sound moogy at all.

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Originally posted by paostby

I thought anyone could easily figure this one out. I'm not a Miller fan so I really don't care. I had always heard (twice, maybe) it was an ARP. But, c'mon. It was 1976. How many options were there?


 

Yeah, you would think it would be a well known fact given how famous that song is and how few electronic instruments were around back then.

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Originally posted by paostby

I thought anyone could easily figure this one out. I'm not a Miller fan so I really don't care. I had always heard (twice, maybe) it was an ARP. But, c'mon. It was 1976. How many options were there?


Sequencer? Why? Any base-competent keyboard player can easily play this (then, not these days).


Keyboard players back then actually used their fingers on those black and white things.


Overlapping? Tape delay (hint: 1976).

 

HAHA!

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Word on the street when the album was released was that it was done on an Oberheim 4 Voice, but I have no idea really. I've always wondered about it whenever I hear anything off that album though...and I'm suprised that it hasn't been documented somewhere. Nobody knows for sure?

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