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Learning Note Routine


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Learn the names of the open strings first: Every Body Gets Drunk After Eleven (E-B-G-D-A-E).

 

Learn ONE string at a time from the first to fret twelve, ignoring the sharp and flat notes. In other words, learn the natural notes. You'll see the patterns quicker (mainly that E-F and B-C are always a half step apart/right next to each other) and realize the sharps and flats sort of learn themselves.

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I am learning the notes on the fretboard and was curious if anyone had a routine on how they memorized the notes to make it easier.

 

You could try these approaches:

 

-Pick one string, and practice naming every note on that string, sequencially, then at random.

 

-Pick one fret and name every note on every string on that fret. Pick a different fret every time you do it.

 

-Practice using only flats to name the notes, then practice naming only by sharps.

 

-Pick one pitch, then find it in every possible location.

 

-Take a simple melody like "mary had a little lamb" or "happy birthday" and transpose it to every key. First name the notes in each key, then play it.

 

-Practice every mode of every major scale in all keys and all positions (naming the notes out loud as you go).

 

-Practice every triad type in every inversion in all keys and positions, close and open-voiced. Do it in one-octave, two-octave, and three-octave sets.

 

-Practice every 7th chord arpeggio (dom7, min7, minb5, dom7#5, dom7b5, maj7, minmanj7, dimmaj7, min7#5 etc...) in every key and inversion in all positions, naming every note out loud as you go. Do it in one-octave, two-octave, and three-octave sets.

 

Note: The last three are very long-range tasks. But if you can do them, I guarantee you'll know the notes on your guitar pretty well!

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I am learning the notes on the fretboard and was curious if anyone had a routine on how they memorized the notes to make it easier.

 

Here's what I did/do...

 

Pick a note, say 'A', find it everywhere on the fret board on all strings.

When that's easy, use a metronome and try and do it at speed under pressure.

Get a book on reading music, start learning to read.

Get in the habit of identifying the notes you play in licks, solos etc. you learn.

Get in the habit of identifying the notes you play in chords, and identifying whether that note is the root, 3rd, 5th etc. etc.

 

I'd suggest you first focus on all the 'white keys' I.e. the Cmaj scale, then the sharps and flats, try and relate it to the study of keys/scales and chords (learn your circle of 5ths).

 

I'd say learning the notes is the single most important thing you can do when it comes to getting a deeper understanding of the fretboard and how it relates to music theory.

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I am learning the notes on the fretboard and was curious if anyone had a routine on how they memorized the notes to make it easier.

 

There's a free online course called "The Fretboard Connection" by MJS Music & Entertainment. It is an eBook with audio, and takes about 15 minutes. As long as you follow directions, it's pretty much guaranteed that you'll never forget the notes on the fretboard.

 

Link: The Fretboard Connection

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You have had good suggestions so far, be sure to go to gennation's site as suggested. Everybody learns differently, so some people don't mind tedious excercises to "find notes." I think that learning music should be done while learning songs. So if you can find something that you use while you learn or play songs, that also strengthens your knowledge of the notes on the fretboard, you got what you wanted wile you learned something useful, and it's natural, not work-like and boring.

 

You first have to recognize the patterns on the guitar and repeating notes, and octaves. You can learn all of this at gennation's site! But learn the open string names. Now notice that when you tune your guitar at the 5th fret, they have the same sounds as the open strings, so you already know all of the names of the notes at the 5th fret. Well at the 7th fret, you find there is an octave from the open string, so you already know all of the names at the 7th fret. Twelfth fret repeats the open strings, you know them already! So you have tons of repeating patterns on the guitar, octave shapes. So once you learn the 3 bass string notes, you can reference higher strings from these octave shapes.

 

What helped me learn the fret names on the 3 bass strings is the CAGED chord system. To find replacement chords in a song, I would have to find the bass note of the chord. So I quickly learned where most of the notes were.

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I had good luck by learning 7th chord arpeggios on each string.


You can get them here:


http://www.esnips.com/doc/5a348332-217d-4259-a5ce-a32edda0e82f/7th-Arp-1


http://www.esnips.com/doc/41db80ad-42c9-4d3c-9676-6df885569d13/7th-Arp-2

 

Thanks for this Virgman...

 

I've been using this for a few days now and it helps on two levels.. learning the notes on the board and ingraining the notes of the chords.

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As mentioned, start with open chords, then write them down in different orders and practice changing from one to the other in different orders. This will help you remember them and speed up your changing from one chord to another.

 

Here is a site where you can print them out, save them, change order, etc.

 

http://www.chordguide.com/guitar/index.asp

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There's a free online course called "The Fretboard Connection" by MJS Music & Entertainment. It is an eBook with audio, and takes about 15 minutes. As long as you follow directions, it's pretty much guaranteed that you'll never forget the notes on the fretboard.


Link:
The Fretboard Connection

 

yup, what he said.

+ practice practice practice

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I'm not very good at it, so I don't know if my suggestion is right.

 

But I'd say to learn the C major scale everywhere on the neck, by connecting the different "boxed shapes" or "3 notes per string shapes".

 

Try to "see" the notes of the C major by imagining the frets highlighted.

 

"Noodle" (play randomly, but don't "jump" too far away) over the scale shapes, slowly enough so that when/after playing a certain note you also say its name.

 

Maybe doing this 10 minutes a day will already make a difference in a few weeks. You will gradually be able to remember the names of more and more frets, and then # and b notes can be derived easily by playing the immediately lower/higher frets.

 

Otherwise if you try to immediately learn 12 notes instead of 7, it's possible it will take much longer, and you won't have the "shapes" to help you if you use all the possible frets.

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