Jump to content

University choice... I need your help


whiteshadow

Recommended Posts

  • Members

I'm looking to do a Masters and I can't choose which University to go to:

 

I can go to my local University in Montreal, where the school is not as recognised and the program is probably not as good, but it would only cost me around 10,000$ (because I already live here).

 

OR, I can go to an Ivy-league school in the U.S. where the school is very well reputed in the domain an it's in California:D b ut it's going to cost me around 60,000$ (which I would have to borrow from a bank)

 

Option 1 is tempting also because I could stay with my band, but I loose out on my career. The difference is Montreal work or Wall Street...

 

What would you guys do? Cheaper and stick around with the band, or more expensive, cool experience, but forget about music for the next couple of years?

 

Edit: Program- Financial Mathematics (i.e. market makers, quantitative modelers, and traders).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 77
  • Created
  • Last Reply
  • Members

Assuming the school in option 1 isn't a total crap hole, I'd go with that one.

Ivy League is totally overrated, in my opinion. My future brother in law is a Harvard grad, and his career didn't exactly zoom off in to outer space. He's doing fine, but I am sure he'd be just as fine with a more modest name at the bottom of his degree.

Unless, like him, your mom is going to pay for it, I think that 50 grand could be spent more wisely, like, supporting you during your job hunt after school.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Originally posted by whiteshadow

I'm looking to do a Masters and I can't choose which University to go to:


I can go to my local University in Montreal, where the school is not as recognised and the program is probably not as good, but it would only cost me around 10,000$ (because I already live here).


OR, I can go to an Ivy-league school in the U.S. where the school is very well reputed in the domain an it's in California:D b ut it's going to cost me around 60,000$ (which I would have to borrow from a bank)


Option 1 is tempting also because I could stay with my band, but I loose out on my career. The difference is Montreal work or Wall Street...


What would you guys do? Cheaper and stick around with the band, or more expensive, cool experience, but forget about music for the next couple of years?

 

 

Depends on what you wanna do. Personally, if I were a smarty pants I would go the expensive route, cost is not an issue if your goal is to be connected. If yr hoping to wrap it up and score a job at the public library then maybe the connections aren't TOO critical. Ultimately it depends on your ambitions don't ya think?

 

Keep in mind I am really asking you! Not a chance in hell I would even dream of having to make the choice you are!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

I didn't go to a huge name University and I think that it really hurt me going into my first job. Luckily I was hired by a US company that didn't know better which helped me.

But I think the best thing that helped open doors is my experience with Apple. Apple's known in the industry for being hard to get into. For any given job posting, they get hundreds of resumes (sometimes even going to the thousands). Since I joined full time I've been headhunted 4 times already. I have a feeling that my so-so University will no longer be a hindrance (or maybe it was just my own personal demon that I was trying to exorcise).

In any case, a big name degree may get you into your first job, but after that, all that matters is whether you can deliver the goods. My suggestion to young people is to intern or find some way to work for a great company. imo that's better than a big fancy diploma that costs huge $$$, I think most of the time the return will never equal the investment.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members
Originally posted by Kestral


In any case, a big name degree may get you into your first job, but after that, all that matters is whether you can deliver the goods. My suggestion to young people is to intern or find some way to work for a great company. imo that's better than a big fancy diploma that costs huge $$$, I think most of the time the return will never equal the investment.



Those seem like wise words... thanks :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Boy, do I know about grad school...

First thing, if it's in CA it's not Ivy League.

Secondly, you should go to the best program that will accept you, which doesn't mean the most famous one, but the one with the faculty that would help you the most. The basic idea is that you have your education -- now you're making connections and doing research in your field and setting up for your first job.

As far as money goes, my best advice to you is not to stop at a Master's degree -- you should be applying to PhD (or equivalent... what's your field?) programs, and if a school doesn't pay for you to be there, you're in the wrong field. I know money is a lot scarcer for foreign students, but we're talking about Assistantships and not need-based aid, so it should still make you some money to work in a PhD program.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Originally posted by ginnboonmiller



As far as money goes, my best advice to you is not to stop at a Master's degree -- you should be applying to PhD (or equivalent... what's your field?) programs, and if a school doesn't pay for you to be there, you're in the wrong field. I know money is a lot scarcer for foreign students, but we're talking about Assistantships and not need-based aid, so it should still make you some money to work in a PhD program.

 

 

+1

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Originally posted by ginnboonmiller

Boy, do I know about grad school...


First thing, if it's in CA it's not Ivy League.


Secondly, you should go to the best program that will accept you, which doesn't mean the most famous one, but the one with the faculty that would help you the most. The basic idea is that you have your education -- now you're making connections and doing research in your field and setting up for your first job.


As far as money goes, my best advice to you is not to stop at a Master's degree -- you should be applying to PhD (or equivalent... what's your field?) programs, and if a school doesn't pay for you to be there, you're in the wrong field. I know money is a lot scarcer for foreign students, but we're talking about Assistantships and not need-based aid, so it should still make you some money to work in a PhD program.

 

 

Well, it's Stanford so technically not Ivy League but the same idea.

 

And if it's a professional degree rather than an academic degree, Master's might be where it's at and why it costs a lot of money.

 

So, yes, an academic program leading to a PhD might make for a better deal financially in the short term, but gawd, then you'd have to actually put in the miserable years.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members
Originally posted by hookstrapped


So, yes, an academic program leading to a PhD might make for a better deal financially in the short term, but gawd, then you'd have to actually put in the miserable years.



Financially it makes more sense to get a masters degree. This is even mentioned in the book Compensation, by Milkovich and Newman.
As a side note, even though I've been done with my PhD classes for a coupe of years now, getting my dissertation done has turned into a nightmare (mostly because of the awful school I chose). I'm seriously considering just forgetting about the degree. The only negative implication would be if I wanted to get into academia, which I don't. Some of the stupidest people I have encountered have PhDs :(

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

This is a good thread. I hate college. I'm 35 and I have been going non-stop (summers too!) for the past 4 years ( a couple of quarters I only took two classes and I had half a year off in 2002)
But I will have my BA in Interactive Communication in December (no it's not a computer "interactive" degree- it's more about mediation and behavioral science)
But I have slowly been sinking further into debt (nearly $35,000 now!) and I have lost all of my freelance work (couldn't take the jobs while in class...) and I have nothing waiting for me when I finish....but I am applying to grad school! :rolleyes:
Why?
Well, I just got my grades up over a 3.0 GPA this summer quarter and with my past work experience and recent conversations with some professors it looks like I would be a good candidate for a fellowship or at least an assistantship (both pay you a living stipend and you get free school!) so I guess I will go for it.
Why not? It's a one year M.A. program and I can opt for a non-thesis track.... May as well get it all out of the way before I hit 40. Then I can start looking for a job, maybe get a savings account. Maybe someday I can actually buy groceries on a regular basis again...


To dream...

P.S. college has proven to me that it is about endurance and discipline more than intelligence. It took A LOT of work to get the degree done. Many weekends chained to the computer (we are on quarters so you have 10 weeks to learn everything, get tested on it, and then forget it :rolleyes: ) and it was difficult at times- but I think anyone could do it...especially if you weren't trying to get a 3.0+ GPA.

B

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members
Originally posted by BryanMichael



P.S. college has proven to me that it is about endurance and discipline more than intelligence. It took A LOT of work to get the degree done. Many weekends chained to the computer (we are on quarters so you have 10 weeks to learn everything, get tested on it, and then forget it
:rolleyes:
) and it was difficult at times- but I think anyone could do it...especially if you weren't trying to get a 3.0+ GPA.


B




This is absolutely true, and I've been saying this here for a while.

Success in college is about jumping through hoops and handing things in on time, and not giving up. It was rare for a prof to not allow rewrites, extensions, extra credit, etc.

In fact, for my undergrad, one computer science professor would accept the programming assignments all the way up until the last day of class. AND, the day after they were due, he went over them, and basically showed you exactly what you should have done. So a lot of people just waited, took copius notes during the review, and turned in their program late for a 90% (lose 10% for lateness) which was a B+.

It seemed so wrong that you could be a brilliant programmer and write perfect {censored} and have it on time, and your grade was only 10% higher than the dude who didn't have a clue, and was just copying down {censored} from the board.

But that's it, it's not about what you know, or how smart you are, it's about what you do and how obedient you are.

If it weren't required by employers, I'd say college was just a big stroke fest and only assholes should go.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

1. The Ivy League is an athletic conference that includes Harvard, Yale, Columbia, Dartmouth, Cornell, Princeton, Pennsylvania, and Brown.

2. Stanford is not an Ivy League school. It is in the PAC-10.

3. Ivy League schools are not overrated for graduate programs, only undergraduate.

4. Not all Ivy League schools are good in every area. Actually, most aren't.

5. Ivy League schools aren't necessarily better than other schools in any area. In fact, my school, Northwestern University, is better than all Ivy League schools in a few areas, including Marketing, Music, Theatre (well, Yale is pretty good here), etc.

6. Here is a list of prestigious non-Ivy League schools: Northwestern, U. Chicago, Rice, Stanford, and Johns Hopkins.

7. Obviously, this list is incomplete and slightly biased.

8. The only way to discover which school is good for you is to visit. Prestige means something, but not everything. Choose where you're most comfortable which the program and atmosphere. To some extent, a Masters is a Masters.

9. Good luck!

10. I fell through the soapbox before I could step off.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members
Originally posted by box handler

8. The only way to discover which school is good for you is to visit. Prestige means something, but not everything. Choose where you're most comfortable which the program and atmosphere.



:( :( :(

cmon. anyone here with experience at columbia? or duke? :(

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Originally posted by jcn37203

To ammend my first post about overratedness, I should have pointed out that I'm in a technical field, not an academic one. So, my potential employers are more interested in what I've done in the industry than where I studied.

 

If you really stop and think about it, most fields are like that - experience is more important than education. That's why I don't see all this obsession with getting a Masters or PhD.

 

Speaking of which, a cousin of mine ended up getting an MBA in what is considered a "Canadian Ivy League" business school. She ended up quitting her job as a high powered analyst to pursue film production. Go figure.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

There's a yank in my EU Politics course that's from John Hopkins...

Anyway, I recently moved from one of Australia's least prestigious universities to the equal most prestigious university in the country - and didn't notice a marked inprovement in the quality of teaching. The difference is all the lecturers are professors, write for international journals etc but when it comes down to teaching undergrad politics and law, I've found they're really no different to the younger 'mere' lecturer with only a masters degree under the belt. I think in the end the eduction I recieve is similar, so what differentiates them is the prestige of the institution. I wasn't in your predicament though because it didn't cost me any extra money to transfer, though it was pretty much universally acknowledged that graduates of the school I used to go to are looked upon by employers with a bit of skepticism.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members
Originally posted by jcn37203




This is absolutely true, and I've been saying this here for a while.


Success in college is about jumping through hoops and handing things in on time, and not giving up. It was rare for a prof to not allow rewrites, extensions, extra credit, etc.


In fact, for my undergrad, one computer science professor would accept the programming assignments all the way up until the last day of class. AND, the day after they were due, he went over them, and basically showed you exactly what you should have done. So a lot of people just waited, took copius notes during the review, and turned in their program late for a 90% (lose 10% for lateness) which was a B+.


It seemed so wrong that you could be a brilliant programmer and write perfect {censored} and have it on time, and your grade was only 10% higher than the dude who didn't have a clue, and was just copying down {censored} from the board.


But that's it, it's not about what you know, or how smart you are, it's about what you do and how obedient you are.


If it weren't required by employers, I'd say college was just a big stroke fest and only assholes should go.



LOL!! I was asking these girls in class last semester (last semester I went to "the other school" and they were all undergrad) and I said I was thinking about taking some Gov't Acc class. These people said "no don't take that with this teacher" I asked why and they all told me because they didn't learn anything.

I was like WTF?!? :confused:

I told them I could learn using google I'm trying to get a piece of paper. LOL!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Originally posted by Kestral


If you really stop and think about it, most fields are like that - experience is more important than education. That's why I don't see all this obsession with getting a Masters or PhD.


Speaking of which, a cousin of mine ended up getting an MBA in what is considered a "Canadian Ivy League" business school. She ended up quitting her job as a high powered analyst to pursue film production. Go figure.

 

 

Just depends. I'd love a masters but I doubt I'll ever pay for one. The only way I'd get one is if an employer paid for it and offered me a decent enough increase afterwards to make it worth my while.

 

But that's just because in my field it doesn't always yield you that high of a return. Certifications tend to be much more important.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.


×
×
  • Create New...