Jump to content

Attack of the Vox clones (a new spin)


opiepac

Recommended Posts

  • Members

This is not your same old "recommend me a Vox clone" thread. It is similar yet different.

 

In my quest for something Vox-like, I have gazed at the reissues and decided they're not for me. In addition I'd like to not spend that much. It seems the Valvetech Hayseed is a good option, but still more than I'd like to spend. Also on the legit Vox tip, I'm looking out for a used AC15.

 

Right now, I'm on a serious budget. I'd like something used in the $300-$500 range. I missed a Laney VC-30 because of a jerk seller, but that's on my list. Also on there are the Crate Vintage 30's. Can anyone else recommend a similarly priced Vox clone and comment on value, tone, etc.

 

 

And here's where the thread is different:

 

I noticed the Laney, and I think the Crate, have solid state rectifiers. Real Vox and higher end stuff use tube rectifiers. I know that solid state for this is more reliable. I've heard the rectifier doesn't affect the tone. Others disagree. Is this an issue? Also are there any decent budget Vox clones with a tube rectifier?

 

Thanks, OP

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

Originally posted by opiepac

I noticed the Laney, and I think the Crate, have solid state rectifiers. Real Vox and higher end stuff use tube rectifiers. I know that solid state for this is more reliable. I've heard the rectifier doesn't affect the tone. Others disagree. Is this an issue? Also are there any decent budget Vox clones with a tube rectifier?

 

 

The choice of an SS or tube rectifier is largely an aesthetic choice in a guitar tube amp. If you want to talk "high end" then many boutique builders and just about all Hi-Fi builders opt for SS rectification over tube recitifaction.

 

The way you rectify will have an impact on the sound, not way around it. Some prefer SS, some prefer tube, it depends on how you play and the genre you play in.

 

Also, there are ways to make SS rectification behave in more tube-like ways, however you probably will find this in a factory amp like a Laney or Crate.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

Originally posted by opiepac

Interesting, I hadn't really considered the Blues Jr, but its not a bad option.

 

 

 

it's worth checking into imo.. though i've heard bad things about the new ones, so you may want to look for a used/older one. they're both EL-84 amps. it definitely isn't a vox clone and has it's own sound but like i said i could get vox tones and was happy with it all around. upgrading the speaker is recommended by pretty much everyone so you might want to look into that if you end up picking one up

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

Originally posted by fernmeister



The choice of an SS or tube rectifier is largely an aesthetic choice in a guitar tube amp. If you want to talk "high end" then many boutique builders and just about all Hi-Fi builders opt for SS rectification over tube recitifaction.


The way you rectify will have an impact on the sound, not way around it. Some prefer SS, some prefer tube, it depends on how you play and the genre you play in.


Also, there are ways to make SS rectification behave in more tube-like ways, however you probably will find this in a factory amp like a Laney or Crate.

 

This is not entirely true. At low volumes you wont notice much differnce between a tube and solid state rectifier (if any). However at high volumes the difference becomes very apparent. A tube rectifer will sag when you hit it hard. There is a slight drop in voltage/and or current to the tubes. This will give a soft compression that many lead players love. Notes will bloom so sweetly. If you like to ride your guitars volume control and/or play harder/softer for clean/distorted passages you know what I'm talking about. A solid state rectifer will react much more quickly when the amp it hit hard. It wont sag and so the amp will repsond quicker sounding punchier. For certain types of music this may be desirable - rock rythms or metal leads where a quick articulate response is needed. Of course this is just a generalization and the rectifier is only one part of the whole picture.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...