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OT questions about the peavey classic 30


capnbringdown

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Alright, so it looks like I'm going to be doing a trade for one of these, but the guy isn't being very specific, and I don't want to have someone drive me out to his place and then find that this thing isn't what I'm looking for.

 

The older tweed models are the ones that are all tube. I don't want to get another hybrid. He says his is 7 years old, is this old enough to be one of those? He didn't comment on whether or not it was one of the tweed ones, but I've asked him that twice. What do you guys think?

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Huh? Maybe I'm about to learn something new here... what, specifically, makes the tweed C30 different than the black C30? I know the black ones are tube amps. Are you saying that the black ones have a different circuit than the tweed?

Or are you saying that older models (which I think only came in tweed?) have a different circuit than all of the new ones (tweed and black are available today).

OR, is it something more subtle, like the effects loop being tube vs. solid state?

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Originally posted by capnbringdown

Alright, so it looks like I'm going to be doing a trade for one of these, but the guy isn't being very specific, and I don't want to have someone drive me out to his place and then find that this thing isn't what I'm looking for.


The older tweed models are the ones that are all tube. I don't want to get another hybrid. He says his is 7 years old, is this old enough to be one of those? He didn't comment on whether or not it was one of the tweed ones, but I've asked him that twice. What do you guys think?

 

 

I don't know what you're talking about, but I know that a 7 year old Peavey Classic 30 is a tube amp.

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I Googled a bit, and I haven't found any reference to different versions/circuits in the C30 over the years. Then again, I may suck at Googling.

Maybe we'll hear more when the sun comes up again in the US. Or perhaps one of our friends across the pond(s) can clear this up?

I'm going with:

as far as I know, all of the Classic 30's are tube amps of similar/same design. The thing you might ask about is what tubes and speaker are in the amp. The C30 is commonly upgraded after purchase with better tubes and a better speaker.

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Originally posted by UncleDig

Huh? Maybe I'm about to learn something new here... what, specifically, makes the tweed C30 different than the black C30? I know the black ones are tube amps. Are you saying that the black ones have a different circuit than the tweed?


Or are you saying that older models (which I think only came in tweed?) have a different circuit than all of the new ones (tweed and black are available today).


OR, is it something more subtle, like the effects loop being tube vs. solid state?

 

 

Well I wasn't really able to google the info I was looking for; I also searched hcef and hcaf, but if you find something, let me know.

 

From what I remember people telling me, the older ones were all tube. I was also led to believe that all the older ones are tweed, though I am uncertain of whether that is true or not. The last point was that the newer ones were hybrid. I'm not sure if I got confused at some point, which is certainly a possibility. Can anyone else help me out here? I'll punch up google again and see if I can figure out where I've gone wrong here.

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The one I briefly owned (now belongs to a bandmate) was a new black one, and it was all tubes (at least - the pre and power amps were tube). EL-84 based, Class A.

From the Peavey site:

"The Classic 30/112 has been redesigned with an all-new chassis design, but still features the distinctive sound and circuitry of the renowned Classic Series amps."

By the way, it has (3) 12AX7s in it, so one of those is probably driving the fx loop as well.
[edit]: NOPE. WRONG. Based on the HC reviews, a few folks there are saying the third tube is part of the gain circuit, kicked in when you switch on the boost.

Bottom line - I think if it's a Classic 30, it's a Class A tube amp. I liked mine, but my buddy needed it and I have another Class A 2x12 amp.

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Okay, your confusion lies in the fact that Peavey has had many amps with "Classic" in the name. These days, you hear "Peavey Classic" and you assume the tweed Classic 30 or 50 which ALL are totally tube . However in the past they had the Classic Chorus (solid state stereo chorus amp), Classic 212, Classic VTX (I think this is the one you have run into before since it has just a tube preamp section) etc. So go get yourself that Classic 30...now. ;)

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Yes. If it's tweed and that age, then it is the Classic 30, which is indeed a tube amp. The ones I've played (as well as the 50s) are great, especially for the money. In line with my Carvin Belair 212, which sounds a bit better, but which is MUCH less reliable. I was just saying something to my brother today that I need to hunt down a 30 or a 50.

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They did recently announce a cosmetic change to the Classics, and the new ones are going to look really bad, like Danelectro had one nighter with an Electar pr something.

Terrible.

But yeah, I'm pretty sure every Classic 30 is all tube.

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Originally posted by capnbringdown

The older tweed models are the ones that are all tube. I don't want to get another hybrid. He says his is 7 years old, is this old enough to be one of those? He didn't comment on whether or not it was one of the tweed ones, but I've asked him that twice. What do you guys think?

 

 

Yes, they made the tweed Classic 30s back in '98. My first tube amp (bought new in '96) was a C30.

Except for the rectifier, the C30s are all tube.

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Classic 30s are considered all tube signal path except for the reverb and efx loop. The reverb is mixed in parallel so it is not a problem. The efx loop is driven by a transistor set up as a buffer and is very transparent. It is also switched out of the circuit when the efx loop is not used.

The boost doesn't add any extra gain stages.
It just revoices the treble control to add major mids.

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Originally posted by edster

Classic 30s are considered all tube signal path except for the reverb and efx loop. The reverb is mixed in parallel so it is not a problem. The efx loop is driven by a transistor set up as a buffer and is very transparent. It is also switched out of the circuit when the efx loop is not used.


The boost doesn't add any extra gain stages.

It just revoices the treble control to add major mids.

 

 

When is the 3rd 12AX7 thrown into the mix? Just when you move to the OD channel?

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Originally posted by UncleDig



When is the 3rd 12AX7 thrown into the mix? Just when you move to the OD channel?

 

 

Half of V3 is a gain stage after the efx return and is also where the neg feedback is injected.

 

The other half of V3 is the phase inverter.

 

V1 and V3 are always active. V2 gets switched in for the drive channel.

 

It's a very clever setup...makes good use of 3 preamp tubes.

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