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George L's cable woes


Mittermax

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Can someone tell me what I'm doing wrong?

 

A while ago, I rewired my pedalboard using all george L's .155 cable. It seems that everytime I move pedals around or even step on a pedal too hard, I get problems with a cable weakening my signal, or just cutting it completely.

 

Right now I've got my old hosa 6" cables and some standard instrument cables in place of ALL of the george L's. The signal is perfect, so I know it was the cables and not a jack or pedal causing the problem.

 

Before I waste my time rewiring my board again, can someone tell me how to assemble the george L's right. I followed the directions, and they do work at first, but am I doing something wrong?

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You need the straighest possible cut (I use a Craftsman 4" utility cutter) and then you need to push the wire down as far as it'll go into the end, bend it over just enough to start the threads on the cap, then screw it down TIGHT! All the way 'til it bottoms out. Sometimes you need a pliers to get the last turn or two. I did my whole board in 1 1/2 hours and not one problem using .155 and unplated ends:
P9220042.jpg

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The main trick is to make sure the cut is perfectly round and the end is perfectly flat. Use a razor blade or good cutters then use pliers to gently make the cable round. THEN, tighten the thumb screw very tight. This is critical.
I'm assuming that you are not trying to strip back any of the reb/black insulation...that is not needed.

Also, blue cable is better! :D LOL

We got the first shipment of BLUE GEORGE L CABLE! Looks incredible!
Robert

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Originally posted by Mittermax

Can someone tell me what I'm doing wrong?


A while ago, I rewired my pedalboard using all george L's .155 cable. It seems that everytime I move pedals around or even step on a pedal too hard, I get problems with a cable weakening my signal, or just cutting it completely.


Right now I've got my old hosa 6" cables and some standard instrument cables in place of ALL of the george L's. The signal is perfect, so I know it was the cables and not a jack or pedal causing the problem.


Before I waste my time rewiring my board again, can someone tell me how to assemble the george L's right. I followed the directions, and they do work at first, but am I doing something wrong?

 

 

Here's the secret to George L's... when you screw the cap on, DO NOT bend the wire... let the cap cut into the rubber, it's the only way they'll function properly. After you've screwed the cap in as tighly as you can with your fingers, give it a nice hard tightening with a pair of pliers. Voil

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Originally posted by Chris Nuccio



Though I am a big fan of making traditional cables, the size of the plugs and cable is damn convenient for having a tidy lookin' board. Decent sound too.

 

 

I agree with this feature of GL's. Seems like everyone that decides to buy a kit off ebay ends up here asking how to put them together. Not blaming the original poster. I just don't think it is a good product for everyone because of the failure rate, even if it is the assembler's fault. For a first timer, soldering cables is no picnic either.

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+1

I have had the same cables for over a year, and no problems so far. I gig a couple of times a month, and have pulled out, re-inserted, trod on the cables any number of times.

Originally posted by Chriss



Here's the secret to George L's... when you screw the cap on, DO NOT bend the wire... let the cap cut into the rubber, it's the only way they'll function properly. After you've screwed the cap in as tighly as you can with your fingers, give it a nice hard tightening with a pair of pliers. Voil

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I use a pair of needlenose pliers to tighten down my george Ls when I am setting up my board. I rarely have an issue, but I will say that over time they will loosen. You will need to go over your board every 6 months or so and you have to tighten them up bigtime and you shouldn't have any issues.

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tiny bit of
Tripod21.jpg
on the threads before you make the cable. Make sure you use the blue kind not the others.

I have had good luck with the right angle george l as long as it is not a stressed connection. I thi8nk the .225 is sturdier and stays together better. My premade straight plug .225 long cables with strain jackets have been like rocks for a year. I think they were like 35 bucks each at MF. Ultimately, if you are going to be moving and removing the connection where the plug is, you need a soldered cable.

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