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Strange ... true bypass boxes, cables and noise


Yek

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I have the strangest experiences using true bypass boxes.

I've had units from Loooper, Loop-Master and Lehle so far.

 

With every unit some noise is generated in the signal.

The noise is directly related to the position of the patch cables!

(moving a cable increases/decreases the noise)

 

No, it's not the power supply. I'm using a PPII but even cutting power to all pedals (all true bypass) doesn't help.

 

No, it's not the cables. I use George L and I've used several others.

 

Is it maybe something of a ground loop, transferred over the patch cable plugs? Who knows?

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Nah, it's not the power. Problem still occurs without any power attached.

 

As soon as a true bypass box / patch unit is used, the cables get "sensitive". If I move a patch cable close to a pedal, hum appears.

 

Strange ...

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True bypass can cause extra static, groundloops in some bad cases, pops when the pedal is engaged(yeah I know of the 1Mohm mod, but what was the point then?)

Too long cables will degenerate the signal as well.

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Originally posted by Rid

True bypass can cause extra static, groundloops in some bad cases, pops when the pedal is engaged(yeah I know of the 1Mohm mod, but what was the point then?)

Too long cables will degenerate the signal as well.

 

 

On thisnote, maybe try a buffered pedal before the loopers. a BS-2 from axess electronics.

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True bypass can cause extra static

 

 

Wrong.

 

 

If you are having hiss problems, I'll guarantee it's a cable problem.

 

Specifically speaking of George L's, those cables will work fine unless that set screw on those plugs isn't screwed down tight enough. If it is not tight, you will get extra hiss because of the cables not the true bypass boxes.

 

This problem is also obvious when anyone says that they can move the cable and the hiss gets worse or better. How can that be the true bypass box?

 

And yes, if the set screw isn't screwed down tight enough, the cable will still work and your cable checkers will test them working 100%.

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If ground is intermittent in the true bypass box then yes, you would lose a bit of shielding in that unit because the internal wires are unshielded. The chassis is common ground and therfore protects the internals from transient noise etc.

 

So which would you think would happen first in a scenerio of noise or hum in a rig if the two problems were tracked down to the following:?

 

Bad grounding in a true bypass box?

 

or

 

Cable problems?

 

 

I just had to fix one of my friend's rigs last weekend. He was having similar noise issues and had some experienced guys to come in and literally take stuff apart and check with meters and still could not track down the problem. I made a little time and took the trip to where his stuff was setup at a club and sure enough, it was a cable problem. And yes, it was George L's. First thing I did when I got there was to listen to the problem. I wiggled a few cords and heard the hum/noise get worse or better as I did this. He was in fact using one of my A/B units and a true bypass box. (Imagine that) I shut the rig down and re-established connections at all the George L's plugs and fired the rig back up and had zero noise.

 

I am remined by this that sometimes, not all the time, huge problems can be fixed by doing the simplest things. :thu:

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I forgot to mention that I have had several emails in the past where customers would email me to tell that when using George L's, some of the loops weren't working on a particular true bypass box I had built for them. They say. "Checks out good with a cable tester" when in fact in the end, it was still the cable.

 

It seems that even a cable that isn't grounded properly will show as "good" on a cable tester or, when using that cord in a loop or to connect to an effect or amp, it may not work when lying in that position but when disconnected to hooked up to a tester in a different position, it will show "good'.

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I'd agree with Loop-Master.

On a side-note, I know that inside a box, you don't want your input and output wires to come too close to eachother or cross, because it will cause some nasty noise, especially in higher gain circuits. Is the same true with wires outside a box? If your George L's are too close outside the box, will they make noise with high gain boxes?

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Originally posted by varialbender

If your George L's are too close outside the box, will they make noise with high gain boxes?

 

 

Assuming they're made up correctly it'll be less of an issue because the cables are shielded. You'd still want to keep them away from mains though, because the grounds in pedals often aren't "good" grounds - they can't sink a lot of current.

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