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I'm thinking of doing some limited run stuff


Marcus Dahl

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I'm thinking of doing some limited run projects this next year since I'm cutting my pedal line back. So there should be time to do them.

 

One of them would be a Cold Gin with a tone circuit. I haven't thought it all the way through yet, but it would have either a Marshall 18 single tone or a treble and bass or maybe even a mid control. I might even do some with a variac type control to get that Van Halen vibe. This is already based on the Marshall 1959 and I'm going to do a regular production run of these at the begining of the year.

 

The other would be an AC30 inspired project. I really love the sound of those amps and it would be cool to get that sound coming out of a Fender.

 

Any thoughts? What would you guys like to see? :idea:

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Marcus, do you happen to have a schematic or link on how a "Voicing" control is achieved like on the H&K Tubefactor?

Turn it counter-clockwise, and it's a mid boost (with less highs and lows), and clockwise it gets more scooped sounding. It has a lot of useful settings and it's a powerful EQ-ing way with just 1 knob.

I've been thinking of implementing a tone-knob in my MiG*Boost as well, but frankly I like the simple 2-knob setup too much.

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Originally posted by Speeddemon

Marcus, do you happen to have a schematic or link on how a "Voicing" control is achieved like on the H&K Tubefactor?


Turn it counter-clockwise, and it's a mid boost (with less highs and lows), and clockwise it gets more scooped sounding. It has a lot of useful settings and it's a powerful EQ-ing way with just 1 knob.


I've been thinking of implementing a tone-knob in my MiG*Boost as well, but frankly I like the simple 2-knob setup too much.



No I don't, but I have a pedal that does a less lows deal. You turn it counter clock wise and it adds bottom end without lossing your highs. You turn it clock wise and it takes the bottom away and seems like you can hear more of the mids. I also have a Tone-X circuit that was built into a pedal for me. That's a cool little circuit. It'll either add low mids or cut hi mids. It's pretty much a wah circuit. They do them with smds. I look around here and see if I have one of those voicing control type schematics, but I don't think I do. You might consider using the mid control section of a Marshall or a Fender.

Oh and I'm a big fan of less is more too. :D

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Originally posted by Marcus Dahl



Oh and I'm a big fan of less is more too.
:D


Yep! Me too.
I want to build a realistic sounding overdrive (3 knobs), that's kinda in the vein of the Hot Cake or the Boss OD-3; which means it has to be able to sound great as a stand-alone OD or as a dirty boost. But check the Boss OD-3 schematic (see attachment), and that's quite a complicated build (85 components or so).

I'd like to stay below 40-45 components, but still have the same filtering and gain cascading. I wonder how much of the stuff in the OD-3 is 'redundant'...

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Originally posted by Speeddemon


Yep! Me too.

I want to build a realistic sounding overdrive (3 knobs), that's kinda in the vein of the Hot Cake or the Boss OD-3; which means it has to be able to sound great as a stand-alone OD or as a dirty boost. But check the Boss OD-3 schematic (see attachment), and that's quite a complicated build (85 components or so).


I'd like to stay below 40-45 components, but still have the same filtering and gain cascading. I wonder how much of the stuff in the OD-3 is 'redundant'...

 

 

Nice looking circuit. The first part of it reminds me of a Marshall pedal circuit. If you apply op-amps to it, it's real similar to a modded TS. Or you can break it down even more and think 2 MXR Dis+ with the second section controling the drive. The last op-amp section controls the tone and is done kinda like a feedback loop going into the non-inverting side. Nice looking circuit. The very last transistor is the buffer or you can think of it as a boost.

 

If it was me, I'd use a couple of dual op-amps and get rid of some of the extra parts. You might be able to get away with 2 duals and one single.

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But how much would become redundant, once you start replacing tranny's with opamps?

Also, is it my misinformation or does an op-amp clip nastier than a good (J-)FET?

Ofcourse, one could use FET-input op-amps like the TL082, right?

I guess it's the everlasting quest by overdrive-builders world-wide: how to get so close as possible to a overdriven tube-amp-sound, without actually using tubes...

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Originally posted by Speeddemon

But how much would become redundant, once you start replacing tranny's with opamps?


Also, is it my misinformation or does an op-amp clip nastier than a good (J-)FET?


Ofcourse, one could use FET-input op-amps like the TL082, right?


I guess it's the everlasting quest by overdrive-builders world-wide: how to get so close as possible to a overdriven tube-amp-sound, without actually using tubes...

 

 

Well I'm not sure. I'd have to bread board it to really tell. The op-amps would cut down on it some, but you are still looking at at least 45-55 components.

 

I always like the way op-amps clipped. They seem to be better sounding to my ear in certain applications.

 

The Cold Gin is based on the Marshall 1959 preamp section. It sounds really close to a tube amp. It's the closest I've heard, but there is no replacing a tube amp. I also did the Death Head after the Marshall 2555. I've been told that it's dead up. I wouldn't really know. I didn't have one to relate to. I just used old GnR and Velvet Revolver recordings to get it right.

 

Anyway. The Cold Gin just uses a 741 and the Death Head uses a TL082 to get their sounds. I used other op-amps in them, but these gave me the best results. I tried a TL071 in the CG, but it became too fuzzy. I also tried an original 4558 in the Death Head, but it made it to bright and noisie. I also tried a TL072 and it was too brittle sounding.

 

You'll have to experiment with things. LEDs, different diodes, op-amps, and some values to get what you want. It took me six months to design the Death Head. (It has 40 on board components)It only took me three weeks to do the Cold Gin. (It has 30 some odd on board component.) Some things take longer than others.

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Originally posted by lowroadrevival

Damn that {censored}ing cold gin pedal sounds gooooood!


If I didnt already have a plexi clone amp, I'd be all over that bitch.



Nice sounding pedal there Marcus. I love ace too.

 

 

Hey THANKS!!!!. That pedal is part of the reason I'm cutting my product line back and putting it into regular production. All of the sound clips of it on my website are all done through Fender amps. The Death Head too. Thanks man!!!

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Interesting stuff there, Marcus.

I happen to recently have acquired 3 Burr Brown op-amps (OPA2604) and I'm curious how they would work out in a drive-circuit. Those bastards are still $4 a piece, so I don't think it would be my preference in a pedal that will be sold, because the op-amps alone would jack up the price with at least $10-12.

I was under the impression that MOSFET's respond the most tube-like, with a certain sag and rounding off, like tubes do.
Do you know anything about this?

Btw, I'm a big Kiss fan too and Ace is quite underrated, given that most of his solo's have top notch phrasing!
I busted my balls for 3 weeks to get the "Shock me" solo down to a T and I forgot most of the nuances half a year later already.

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Originally posted by Speeddemon

Interesting stuff there, Marcus.


I happen to recently have acquired 3 Burr Brown op-amps (OPA2604) and I'm curious how they would work out in a drive-circuit. Those bastards are still $4 a piece, so I don't think it would be my preference in a pedal that will be sold, because the op-amps alone would jack up the price with at least $10-12.


I was under the impression that MOSFET's respond the most tube-like, with a certain sag and rounding off, like tubes do.

Do you know anything about this?


Btw, I'm a big Kiss fan too and Ace is quite underrated, given that most of his solo's have top notch phrasing!

I busted my balls for 3 weeks to get the "Shock me" solo down to a T and I forgot most of the nuances half a year later already.

 

 

No I don't think I would use a $4 op-amp either, but you can socket it and make it avaiable for either an up charge or an after market item.

 

Mosfets do come close to the tube like sound. I'm not really technical guy. I do all of my testing by ear and I've got a couple of other guys I use to help in that area. The concensus I have on mosfets to my ear is that they get close, but do a couple of things that don't sound tube like.

 

One is they can get fizzy sounding when the gain is cranked.

 

Two they can scoup your mids out, and three they can have a sharp high end.

 

The thing that makes them more tube like is the way they look on an osciliscope. They are more rounded in the appearance area and similar to a tube, but not exact and sometimes if not most don't sound like a tube. Take listen to the old Tube Works amps and you'll see what I mean. Putting them in the right context can help out the tone of a circuit. Use your ears to get the right sound, and be familiar with the sounds of other op-amps. There are sutile differences in the tone. Not everyone can hear it, but it will become , at least to me, on stage.

 

I love that tune. Ace is an under rated guitarist. He's a little sloppy like the Stones, but is just as technical as Page. Some of the later recordings had Bob Kullick playing. Bruce's brother.

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