Jump to content

That's what I call playing your scales


hookstrapped

Recommended Posts

  • Members

My daughter's violin teacher gave her a new scale exercise: play the 4-octave scale and arepeggio of every major and minor key, continuously.

 

She told me about it after she staggered out of the aoust-a-pottie and sprawled across my bed. 32 minutes. Of couse, with as good tone and perfect intonation at the end as at the beginning.

 

:D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

scales on violin suck.
how about this one, my teacher had me play each 4 octave scale (major and minor), chromatically ascending, one after the other, then back down. once I mastered that, I had to play one in half notes, the next in quarter notes, then next in eighth notes, then triplets, then 16ths, then quintuplets, then 6 to a beat, then 7 to a beat, then 32nds, then start over at half notes, and repeat for each scale going up.
hard to understand but like -
G-half
G#-quarter
A-eighth
A#-triplets
B-16ths
and so on, never stopping between scales, and he had me play at 80 bmp. took me months to get that straight. what a bastard.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Originally posted by harbong

scales on violin suck.

how about this one, my teacher had me play each 4 octave scale (major and minor), chromatically ascending, one after the other, then back down. once I mastered that, I had to play one in half notes, the next in quarter notes, then next in eighth notes, then triplets, then 16ths, then quintuplets, then 6 to a beat, then 7 to a beat, then 32nds, then start over at half notes, and repeat for each scale going up.

hard to understand but like -

G-half

G#-quarter

A-eighth

A#-triplets

B-6 to a beat

and so on, never stopping between scales, and he had me play at 80 bmp. took me months to get that straight. what a bastard.

 

 

Before this, she would do the entire set of scale variations in the Flesch scale book, which sounds like what you describe, but just one key at a time.

 

Violin teachers are a special breed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

indeed. I'm glad I switched to viola though, it's more fun to play I found. but that's after I gave up solo performance. It was just too stressful for a non-music major like myself. I can't even imagine working on a concerto every month ontop of tackling abstract algebra, higher physics, and giving orchestra lessons to youngsters at the same time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members
Originally posted by Help!I'maRock!

that's exactly the type of thing my guitar teacher will be pushing me towards in the next year.
:eek:



No wonder I don't take guitar lessons, these type of practices would make me want to quit. :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members
Originally posted by Klisk



No wonder I don't take guitar lessons, these type of practices would make me want to quit.
:D



i'm on a mission to not only learn the fretboard, but basically learn all of the theory i forgot or didn't pay attention to in college. right now, i have to play the same 12 bars in 6 different positions on the fretboard, while saying (or if possible singing) the note.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members
Originally posted by hookstrapped

Of couse, with as good tone and perfect intonation at the end as at the beginning.


:D



perfect intonation??:confused:

She plays violin, right????













....j/k I know she's very good, and probably has perfect intonation, unlike most violinist I've encountered.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Originally posted by Lanefair

Alternatively you could play half a dream theater song.

 

 

 

OK, that was {censored}ing funny!

 

 

hookstrapped, what was the exersize ? Arpeggios up and scales down ? Or arpeggio up and down then scale up and down ?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Originally posted by Merkin




OK, that was {censored}ing funny!



hookstrapped, what was the exersize ? Arpeggios up and scales down ? Or arpeggio up and down then scale up and down ?

 

 

It was scale up and down, then arpeggio up and down.

 

And Rob Eadgbe (haven't seen you around for a while - missed you on ugly steeple fear's what pickup should I put in the neck of my custom Tele thread) -- the thing about perfect intonation is to check whatever note you're playing, insofar as possible, as a fourth or fifth against an open string. The violinist can hear under the ear the sympathetic ringing of the open string.

 

And the audience can hear it, not so much as perfect intonation (because things sound good if they are in relatively correct intonation) but as a richness in tone. My daughter has this tone, ever since she was very young, that has excited her teachers and people who hear her play. But it wasn't consistent. Now, she's discovered at least one aspect of it that she can be very consistent with. With perfect intonation, by exciting the open strings, you get this harmonic richness to the tone. The difference between a note that sounds choked and a note that blooms. Pretty cool.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...