Jump to content

OT: Someone explain car subwoofers to me, please.


Klisk

Recommended Posts

  • Members

The irony of the question is that this is being asked on the EFFECTS forum. Not everybody has to play guitar to modify sounds.

 

On the other hand, much of it is part incompetence, not every installer is capable of speaker system design.

 

As to the computer sub with no speaker in it, you just haven't found it yet.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

subwoofers are interesting, but they make me nervous. cars playing three-note walking bass-line "jeep hits" with their trunks vibrating madly and rust dust rising from the cracks as they sit next to me at a red light make me think there ought to be a law.

 

subwoofers can be misleading to recording engineers. i don't know many engineers who work with them. every consumer sets up their subwoofers at a different level, so the subs are always at an arbitrary volume. there's no way to predict how they'll be set...

 

subwoofers exaggerate a portion of the spectrum that was basically filtered out of music at the microphone or recording console for decades. bass was much more organized before an enormous amount of arbitrarily-set power became available in modern listening equipment.

 

subwoofers are, in my opinion, very useful for X.1 systems connected to dvd players, and self-powered computer speakers. i don't personally believe they have any place in high-quality audio systems used for music listening. they tend to disorganize audio. and in cars, they need to be reigned in and set to a balanced level to match the satellite stereo speakers, not set 10 dB or more above the mix as a demonstration of sheer power.

 

on edit: btw, subwoofers always use some sort of speaker technology to produce sound... sometimes a servo-motor driving a piston (for large applications.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Originally posted by monkeyland

i highly doubt that your computer system uses a passive radiator. what system do you have? i think you are still somewhat confused on the terminology.

 

Nah, I googled it, this guy confirms it's a passive radiator.

 

http://tinyurl.com/82vkg

 

They're honestly cheapo speakers, but really, I love how they sound -- I somehow chose them OVER Klipsch's a few years ago, after testing a few setups. :eek: They get awful reviews though, so it's possible my ears like something different than your average joe. I actually get irritated if the high end gets too sharp/crisp.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Originally posted by zachary vex

subwoofers are interesting, but they make me nervous. cars playing three-note walking bass-line "jeep hits" with their trunks vibrating madly and rust dust rising from the cracks as they sit next to me at a red light make me think there ought to be a law.


subwoofers can be misleading to recording engineers. i don't know many engineers who work with them. every consumer sets up their subwoofers at a different level, so the subs are always at an arbitrary volume. there's no way to predict how they'll be set...


subwoofers exaggerate a portion of the spectrum that was basically filtered out of music at the microphone or recording console for decades. bass was much more organized before an enormous amount of arbitrarily-set power became available in modern listening equipment.


subwoofers are, in my opinion, very useful for X.1 systems connected to dvd players, and self-powered computer speakers. i don't personally believe they have any place in high-quality audio systems used for music listening. they tend to disorganize audio. and in cars, they need to be reigned in and set to a balanced level to match the satellite stereo speakers, not set 10 dB or more above the mix as a demonstration of sheer power.

 

I like your view on it a lot. :D It makes sense to me. Though actually, in NJ, you can (supposedly) get a 500 dollar ticket for keeping your subwoofer too loud in your car. I've never seen this happen, but the people who have "booming" systems are always cutting them off and getting paranoid when cops are around. So I guess there is some sort of noise pollution law against them here, but it doesn't stop people.

 

Nowadays I wouldn't be surprised if rap engineers work with subwoofers, but other than that, it still seems like it's way overdone in cars. Even in a home setup, at least mine, the woofer is set pretty low anyways, but it adds a mild but pleasant depth rather than the whole rattle thing.

 

To my ears, I have to agree that the audio sounds disorganized in (a lot) of these setups, but maybe I've gotten too much into a habit of listening for those type of things. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Originally posted by monkeyland

my point being that a passive radiator on its own will do nothing. according to that link the subwoofer contains a 5 inch speaker and an 8 inch passive radiator. the PR makes it so that the sub sounds bigger than it is.

 

Gotchya'. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Anonymous

Real quick.. about the 5.1 in surround sound systems... from my limited experience with mixing for DVD back in the day (when it actually required a $100k system to do so), the ".1" is actually a seperate track specifically mixed for the sub woofer known as the "boom" track.

 

The reason it's called the "boom" track is so that audio engineers would specifically mix low frequency sounds to that track to enhance such things as powerful explosions, earthquake rumble, etc. etc..

 

Also, the thing with true surround sound is that all 6 channels (including the boom track) are actually seperate tracks (like stereo is seperate) that each go to their specified speaker (including the boom track).

 

Of course, with car stereos, it's just stereo, so the bass you are hearing comes from those two stereo tracks.

 

- - -

 

Now-a-days, I hear that they're moving on to even having 7 speaker systems for DVD's, and I love the idea of car systems having surround sound and musicians beginning to mix that way... but I don't think we're quite there yet.

 

- - -

 

On a final side note, in case you didn't know... Pink Floyd was recording for Quadrophonic sound back in the day (That's four channels, as oppsed to two with stereo). They even pressed some albums for quadrophonic play, and you had to buy a special record player with multiple needles to play the record! :')

 

randomness,

devi-

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members
Originally posted by Devi Ever

Real quick.. about the 5.1 in surround sound systems... from my limited experience with mixing for DVD back in the day (when it actually required a $100k system to do so), the ".1" is actually a seperate track specifically mixed for the sub woofer known as the "boom" track.


The reason it's called the "boom" track is so that audio engineers would specifically mix low frequency sounds to that track to enhance such things as powerful explosions, earthquake rumble, etc. etc..


Also, the thing with true surround sound is that all 6 channels (including the boom track) are actually seperate tracks (like stereo is seperate) that each go to their specified speaker (including the boom track).


Of course, with car stereos, it's just stereo, so the bass you are hearing comes from those two stereo tracks.


- - -


Now-a-days, I hear that they're moving on to even having 7 speaker systems for DVD's, and I love the idea of car systems having surround sound and musicians beginning to mix that way... but I don't think we're quite there yet.


- - -


On a final side note, in case you didn't know... Pink Floyd was recording for Quadrophonic sound back in the day (That's four channels, as oppsed to two with stereo). They even pressed some albums for quadrophonic play, and you had to buy a special record player with multiple needles to play the record! :')


randomness,

devi-

Yes,I recall when discrete quad was THE real deal,for a very short period of time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

Originally posted by Devi Ever

Real quick.. about the 5.1 in surround sound systems... from my limited experience with mixing for DVD back in the day (when it actually required a $100k system to do so), the ".1" is actually a seperate track specifically mixed for the sub woofer known as the "boom" track.


The reason it's called the "boom" track is so that audio engineers would specifically mix low frequency sounds to that track to enhance such things as powerful explosions, earthquake rumble, etc. etc..


Also, the thing with true surround sound is that all 6 channels (including the boom track) are actually seperate tracks (like stereo is seperate) that each go to their specified speaker (including the boom track).


Of course, with car stereos, it's just stereo, so the bass you are hearing comes from those two stereo tracks.


- - -


Now-a-days, I hear that they're moving on to even having 7 speaker systems for DVD's, and I love the idea of car systems having surround sound and musicians beginning to mix that way... but I don't think we're quite there yet.


- - -


On a final side note, in case you didn't know... Pink Floyd was recording for Quadrophonic sound back in the day (That's four channels, as oppsed to two with stereo). They even pressed some albums for quadrophonic play, and you had to buy a special record player with multiple needles to play the record! :')


randomness,

devi-

 

 

Interesting stuff. ":3 I have to wonder how surround sound will effect music, but I'm not against it at all. One thing I should note about my 5.1 setup is that I lay all 5 speakers out in front of me, instead of around me. I know, sort of defeats the purpose, but I predominately use my computer for music anyways and it sounds better this way to me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...