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Phasers VS Flangers


Snare227

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Hey guys... I'm looking for something to add to my signal chain. I've got overdrives and distortions under control, along with a crybaby that gets random use and a GE 7 and compressor. I'm looking to get a delay as soon as the funds open up or Behringer releases their cheap copy, whichever happens first. I like the sound of my Boss CH-1 for cleans but I'd like something with a little more depth to it. So under modulation which do most people prefer... phaser or flanger. I'm leaning towards a flanger based on some of the multieffects I have. I play pop/rock/alternative stuff mostly although we do bar gigs from time to time where we run the gauntlet of genres. Any other suggestions on pedals to try are welcome.

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Phaser, no doubt.

Analogman-modded Small Stone is on my board & I want 1 more. The other will be a Moog OR a ModMax OR a 4ms Phaseur Fleur, can't decide.

I also run a Small Clone, TC Jauernig Luxury Twin-Rate Tremolo, & a Line 6 Roto-Machine.

Flanger falls after all these for me, although I do want to get one. :D

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It's really a matter of taste.
I do prefer the sharp metalliv sound of a flanger to the springlike sound of a phaser.
Eventually there's a use for both.

I'd say if you player rather smooth relaxed stuff or arpeggios, a phaser would be better suited. If you play rock rhythms, a flanger would get more use IMO.

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One day I'm going to really, really understand the difference between flanging and phase-shifting. In short, as far as I can tell, a flanger is just a particular static kind of phase shifter. Flangers are definitely delay-based, and I don't think phase shifters are, but the effect is the same: the signal is filtered by an out-of-phase copy of itself, according to the non-linearity of the filter. The non-linearity of the flanging filter is fixed, but the delay time changes, moving the notch filters up and down on an LFO. Phasers are somehow different -- the non-linearity of the filters themselves are changed? I don't know. Some smart guy should explain it to me.

Ok, enough of that. I use a phaser a lot, especially when I run in stereo, for a leslie-type sound at faster speeds or just a general spread at slower ones. I use a flanger to hollow out an overdriven sound, cause I love pj harvey, but I don't let the thing whoosh at all.

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the distinction between phasers and flangers...

phasers are frequency based delays... and the delay is based in degrees not time. the phase shift effects only a certain frequency range, and the range is modulated.

flangers are very very fast time based delays. The delay time is modulated.

both effects naturally produce notches, but can also produce peeks by using feedback.

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Originally posted by Brian Marshall

the distinction between phasers and flangers...


phasers are frequency based delays... and the delay is based in degrees not time. the phase shift effects only a certain frequency range, and the range is modulated.


flangers are very very fast time based delays. The delay time is modulated.


both effects naturally produce notches, but can also produce peeks by using feedback.

 

 

1. Do phasers use lfo's?

 

2. What does 'frequency based delay' mean?

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