Jump to content

awm vs awm2 etc whats the difference?


morty77

Recommended Posts

  • Members

 

AWM (Advanced Wave Memory) used 12 bit sampling while AWM2 samples are 16 bit.

 

 

Hmmmm.... I don't know myself what the difference between AWM and AWM2 is, but I don't think bitrate is it. I have a 1988 Clavinova digital piano, it's first generation AWM, and the piano is 16-bit (and sounds great).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

I'd like to politely disagree with the "AWM=12bit, AWM2=16bit" hypothesis. There are 16-bit Yamaha synths using AWM: MU100r, the aforementioned Clavinova, etc.

 

If I haven't been misinformed by the Yamaha chap who told me, it goes like this:

 

We all know that the Big Three use data compression on their core ROM libraries (which is why their specs read, "when converted to 16-bit linear," rather than specifying a raw megabyte size.) The way I was told, AWM uses a constant algorithm to encode the wave information. AWM2, on the other hand, allows the programmer (sound designer) to roughly optimize the compression for a given sample. For example, a triangle lead may be able to suffer much more compression (due to the fact that it has very little bandwidth and harmonics) when compared with a steel-string guitar, or harpsichord, both of which contain a great deal of non-static harmonics.

 

So, it's kinda like Photoshop's "save for web" function for sound designers: reduce the quality until the source material starts to suffer, then back it off a bit.

 

Hope this gives some food for thought.

 

-Hoax

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

I'd like to politely disagree with the "AWM=12bit, AWM2=16bit" hypothesis. There are 16-bit Yamaha synths using AWM: MU100r, the aforementioned Clavinova, etc.

 

 

AWM and AWM2 are just marketing names - when Yamaha switched to 16-bit samples in 1992, they decided to increase the "version" at some point, but any other significant changes since then (such as introduction of sample compression in 1997 or 8 oscillators in 2007) went without such an increase. You can regard them as a collection of features like the number of oscillators/LFOs/EGs, the structure of the effect block etc. - I'm not even sure if these were changed in transition from AWM to AWM2.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

I'd like to politely disagree with the "AWM=12bit, AWM2=16bit" hypothesis. There are 16-bit Yamaha synths using AWM: MU100r, the aforementioned Clavinova, etc.

 

 

At some point Yamaha started reffering to AWM2 as simply AWM. Therefore all today's AWM = AWM2

 

Look here under AWM2 entry

http://files.keyfax.com/download/S90_Glossary.pdf

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...