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Can pretty much any pedal be true-bypassed, if rehoused?


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I ask because I found my old, neglected "Studio Series" flanger in my storage building the other day, and it's missing parts, such as the nuts for the jacks, a knob, etc., as I've cannibalized them over the years for other things. I thought it would be a good rehouse project, to make true bypass. I don't have another flanger, so I figure this little $10 yardsale (or was it a pawnshop? I do remember it was 10 bucks, though, years back) find could be made useful, and give me something to tinker with.

 

The bypass switch just has 2 wires coming off it. Could I wire a 3PDT switch to true bypass it and run the LED fairly easily, or would it be tricky, somehow? I don't have a schematic for the pedal, and I can't really read one (yet) anyway. Is it pretty much the same generic procedure for any pedal? This one's a junker that I want to use to learn and experiment a little, basically.

 

Also, does anybody know anything about "Studio Series" pedals? Are they decent?

 

Thanks.

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Get one of these switches and transfer the wires over. It's expensive but it should work like a charm and will save you the trouble of true-bypassing the thing. When I ordered it it came with two so the price wasn't so bad. They don't say it comes with two though so I don't know if it was a mistake or not.

http://www.smallbearelec.com/Detail.bok?no=26

Good luck. :thu:

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I ask because I found my old, neglected "Studio Series" flanger in my storage building the other day, and it's missing parts, such as the nuts for the jacks, a knob, etc., as I've cannibalized them over the years for other things. I thought it would be a good rehouse project, to make true bypass. I don't have another flanger, so I figure this little $10 yardsale (or was it a pawnshop? I do remember it was 10 bucks, though, years back) find could be made useful, and give me something to tinker with.


The bypass switch just has 2 wires coming off it. Could I wire a 3PDT switch to true bypass it and run the LED fairly easily, or would it be tricky, somehow? I don't have a schematic for the pedal, and I can't really read one (yet) anyway. Is it pretty much the same generic procedure for any pedal? This one's a junker that I want to use to learn and experiment a little, basically.


Also, does anybody know anything about "Studio Series" pedals? Are they decent?


Thanks.

 

 

i have the Studio Series analog delay and it's awesome.

let your ears judge the flanger.

 

but my delay has a "soft switch" like a Boss, so if yours is like that you may need to reahouse it.

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according to AM/non-digital tom's book, most likely maxon-built. they appeared under at least a dozen names, the same series. disco-freq's site has a bunch of that family.

i've got the delay as well, and it totally rocks. and self-oscs to boot.

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Get one of these switches and transfer the wires over. It's expensive but it should work like a charm and will save you the trouble of true-bypassing the thing. When I ordered it it came with two so the price wasn't so bad. They don't say it comes with two though so I don't know if it was a mistake or not.


http://www.smallbearelec.com/Detail.bok?no=26


Good luck.
:thu:



Wouldn't that essentially be the same as the switch I have, electronically speaking? I figure since I'm going to rehouse it anyway, I may as well T.B. it at the same time.

Guya...of course I'll let my ears be the judge, but I've not heard the thing in years, so I don't really have a frame of reference yet. I suppose I could try it out in its unhoused condition, but I want to do it as much for the project as for the pedal. Just seems like a cool thing to do, even if I don't wind up liking it. I'm not a big flange fan, generally, so I basically just want an example of a flange for the odd times I want to mess with one.

Other than just wiring another switch in like the one I have, how difficult would it be to wire the tpdt up? Will I have to trace the signal path across the circuit board, or is it basically a matter of soldering the two wires I have to two lugs, then wiring the inputs, outputs, and LED to the other lugs?

Basically, I just need to know if this is a generic procedure common to pretty much all pedals, or does the circuitry affect the difficulty of true-bypassing? Also, would I be better off to do it sans LED, to avoid a "pop" when switching? It seems like I've read somewhere that an LED can cause that to happen.

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Or, remove the jfets from the switching system and true bypass into the circuit directly... that's my preferred method since it removes any possible noise or distortion contributed by the switching transistors.

 

regards, Jack

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Get one of these switches and transfer the wires over. It's expensive but it should work like a charm and will save you the trouble of true-bypassing the thing. When I ordered it it came with two so the price wasn't so bad. They don't say it comes with two though so I don't know if it was a mistake or not.


http://www.smallbearelec.com/Detail.bok?no=26


Good luck.
:thu:



A mistake, I'd say. I've ordered one of those for rehousing an old Rocktek chorus, and got exactly what I'd ordered - one.

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A mistake, I'd say. I've ordered one of those for rehousing an old Rocktek chorus, and got exactly what I'd ordered - one.

 

 

 

Oh, well cool then. Makes up for extremely long shipping process and other forgotten parts I experienced with a couple orders from then. ;)

 

Weird how they made that "mistake" though. They were both in the same little bag together. :confused:

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Wouldn't that essentially be the same as the switch I have, electronically speaking? I figure since I'm going to rehouse it anyway, I may as well T.B. it at the same time.





Yeah, it'll be the same - not true-bypass. It's just an easier choice if you decide not to TB it but still want it rehoused.

Anyway, I think this little diagram will work for what you're doing, as long as you wire the circuit to be always on when power is applied, as mentioned already. :thu:

3pdt3.jpg

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Or, remove the jfets from the switching system and true bypass into the circuit directly... that's my preferred method since it removes any possible noise or distortion contributed by the switching transistors.


regards, Jack

 

 

How do I find and identify the jfets to remove them?

 

This is more of a "learning" project to me, than anything else, so I'd definitely like to wire the TB up, and this seems like a good idea, as well.

 

Otherwise, if I just jumper the original switch leads to always be on, where do I solder the wires from the 3pdt to? Same place as the original switch wires, plus the other wiring to the jacks and LED? Would this method introduce the switching noise you were referring to? Also, if I disconnect the LED from it's original place, will I need to close the connection back up to the original LED wires, or will it matter?

 

Sorry for all the questions, I'm just trying to get my head around what I want to do before diving in. Thanks.

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For the "to circuit" and "from circuit" connections you'll probably need to desolder the input and output jacks (if they're board-mounted), and connect their tip connectors to the switch.

Also, the wiring in comfortablynumb's post has one small flaw - the effect circuit isn't grounded when bypassed. That can introduce some noise. I prefer grounding either the effect input or output.
Further, if you rewire the LED, make sure there's a current-limiting resistor between it and the +9V supply. It could be on the board, or soldered directly to the LED's lead (and possibly covered with heatshrink).

For a nice wiring schematic that includes all offboard components except the pots (that is, switch, LED, input/out jacks and power), see the offboard wiring project at tonepad.com:
http://www.tonepad.com/project.asp?id=35
The fifth schematic in the PDF shows the wiring for true bypass with LED.

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The input/output jacks aren't board-mounted, so that part will be pretty easy.

I'll probably post more questions when I get some parts and get started, but thanks so far, all. What value resistor do I need for the "current limiting" resistor on the LED? I'll order it with my case, switch, and jacks.

Also, do I need stereo jacks on the input and output to wire to the 3pdt? That's not a big deal either way, as I can pick jacks up at Radio Shack...

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Re the LED and the resistor, the pedal should already have it (on the PCB or soldered directly to the LED, like I mentioned). Sorry, I probably could have been clearer on that, but it was past 2 AM when I posted.

What I meant was, make sure you locate the LED's resistor and keep it in series with the LED (ie. in front of, or after it). It can be easy to miss that part when rewiring the LED. For instance, if the resistor is on the board and you rewire the LED to get +9V directly from the DC jack, you'll also have to remove the resistor from the board and solder it to the LED's lead.

As for the jacks, you need a stereo jack for the input. Output jack can be mono. The stereo jack functions as a simple switch when used with a mono plug, making sure no power is drawn when there's nothing plugged to the pedal's input. If you want, you can make the output jack be that switch, or even both of them together. It's simply the de facto standard for most pedals to use the input jack for switching. Also, you might see a lot of pedals that also have a stereo output jack, even though the third lug is unused - that's so that the manufacturer only has to stock one type of jacks, which makes things a bit easier and cheaper to manage.

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