Jump to content

Volume Pedals????


stratmaster48

Recommended Posts

  • Members

There's a huge difference. I've tried many and I like the Ernie Ball the best by far. On some of the cheaper one's it's hard to get a smooth volume swell - it's like it goes from 0 to 5 rather than fro 0 to 1 at the very top of the pedal range.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

i've never owned one, and I was wondering what the differences are (if any).


hook it up

 

 

The Ernie Balls have scratchy pots and are real tonesuckers in bypass. IF you want something that's a bit more transparent with a smoother pot then check out the Goodrich.

 

Active pedals like the George Dennis or Goodrich LDR2 have the smoothest volume transitions because they do not use pots like the inactive Ernie Ball type of pedals. But they are really expensive, and they are buffered. Some players don't like the buffered sound.

 

Overall, it's still best to just use your guitar knob. Unless you have a serious need it's not really worth putting a volume pedal on your board....just get good with your guitar's volume knob

 

Just an opinion, others may certainly disagree.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

The Ernie Balls have scratchy pots and are real tonesuckers in bypass. IF you want something that's a bit more transparent with a smoother pot then check out the Goodrich.


Active pedals like the George Dennis or Goodrich LDR2 have the smoothest volume transitions because they do not use pots like the inactive Ernie Ball type of pedals. But they are really expensive, and they are buffered. Some players don't like the buffered sound.


Overall, it's still best to just use your guitar knob. Unless you have a serious need it's not really worth putting a volume pedal on your board....just get good with your guitar's volume knob


Just an opinion, others may certainly disagree.

 

 

You can't use the volume knob for swells and fades while both of your hands are already busy playing. I think most of the people here using volume pedals are using them with lots of effects (ebow, delay, reverb, etc) and just using them to controll dynamics and for synth pad-like sounds... that's what i'll be using it for too. I'm gonna get the 25K ernie ball one though and use it in the FX loop of my amp, so that I don't lose gain or much treble when backing off on volume.... just controlling the volume

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

There are High Impedance and Low Impedance Volume pedals, each designed for a particular function. Hi-Z for plugging your guitar into, Low-Z for use as a Continuous Controller for a rack device.

 

I prefer the Boss FV-500 Series to the Ernie ball, for sturdy build quality and smoothness of the taper (heel to toe).

 

FV-500H-lg.jpg

 

FV-500H-lg.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

There are High Impedance and Low Impedance Volume pedals, each designed for a particular function. Hi-Z for plugging your guitar into, Low-Z for use as a Continuous Controller for a rack device.

 

I prefer the Boss FV-500 Series to the Ernie ball, for sturdy build quality and smoothness of the taper (heel to toe).

 

FV-500H-lg.jpg

 

Boss_FV-500L.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

The Ernie Balls have scratchy pots and are real tonesuckers in bypass. IF you want something that's a bit more transparent with a smoother pot then check out the Goodrich.


Active pedals like the George Dennis or Goodrich LDR2 have the smoothest volume transitions because they do not use pots like the inactive Ernie Ball type of pedals. But they are really expensive, and they are buffered. Some players don't like the buffered sound.


Overall, it's still best to just use your guitar knob. Unless you have a serious need it's not really worth putting a volume pedal on your board....just get good with your guitar's volume knob


Just an opinion, others may certainly disagree.

 

 

sorry dude but that's just dumb.

 

A passive pedal is just a guitar volume pot rigged to a footpedal.....either way they are both just potentiometers. They aren't scratchy unless you get an old one that has been dragged through the mud and left to rust in a danky closet.

 

When the pot is closed all the way, the "sweeper" in the potentiometer is connected and it's basicly unity, or a striaght connection just like a cable. A buffer will alter tone more than a passive volume pedal closed to 100% volume.

 

The EB VPJR (which I play) has a cool little switch inside that alters the taper for two disctinctly different swell rate. Which I supposse is similiar to comparing audio and lineae tapers. But honestly it's just a guess.

 

Try the volume pedal AFTER distortion for a smoother distorted swell. Some distortions don't clean up well. Or also try flipping the switch. I had the same problem and flipping the switch up fixed it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

EB vp jr... some rigs they suck tone, others they just control volume... Don't use the tuner out, that's for sure.


I LOVE mine, I've used it everyday for the past 2 years.

 

I use the EB VP jr. tuner out for my tuner. It hasn't affected my tone.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

sorry dude but that's just dumb.


A passive pedal is just a guitar volume pot rigged to a footpedal.....either way they are both just potentiometers. They aren't scratchy unless you get an old one that has been dragged through the mud and left to rust in a danky closet.


When the pot is closed all the way, the "sweeper" in the potentiometer is connected and it's basicly unity, or a striaght connection just like a cable. A buffer will alter tone more than a passive volume pedal closed to 100% volume.


The EB VPJR (which I play) has a cool little switch inside that alters the taper for two disctinctly different swell rate. Which I supposse is similiar to comparing audio and lineae tapers. But honestly it's just a guess.


Try the volume pedal AFTER distortion for a smoother distorted swell. Some distortions don't clean up well. Or also try flipping the switch. I had the same problem and flipping the switch up fixed it.

 

 

All inactive volume pedals shave off high end and can get "muffled" or "wooly" or "sandy" or "fuzzy" when used. I call it "scratchy"

 

Lower quality pots, like the ones found in stock Ernie Ball, do this the worst. Some guys will mod the pedal with a higher quality pot to alleviate the problem. BUT, the problem is still there. It's just how volume pots are. The only way to get rid of this is to use an active pedal. And I agree with what you said, some players don't like the buffered sound of active and will actually prefer a passive pedal in their chain.

 

Basically, you just misunderstood me. I think we're saying pretty similar things.

 

In the end, most people can get away with just using their guitar volume pot and be happy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

All inactive volume pedals shave off high end and can get "muffled" or "wooly" or "sandy" or "fuzzy" when used. I call it "scratchy"


Lower quality pots, like the ones found in stock Ernie Ball, do this the worst. Some guys will mod the pedal with a higher quality pot to alleviate the problem. BUT, the problem is still there. It's just how volume pots are. The only way to get rid of this is to use an active pedal. And I agree with what you said, some players don't like the buffered sound of active and will actually prefer a passive pedal in their chain.


Basically, you just misunderstood me. I think we're saying pretty similar things.


In the end, most people can get away with just using their guitar volume pot and be happy.

 

 

Actually, both sides are correct, but it is not the pot quality; it's the impedance value.

 

A 250k pot, like the one found in a EBjr, will suck tone out of a guitar with higher output pickups, same as it would if it was in the guitar, because it doesn't have enough resistance to keep some of the higher freqs from escaping to the ground at higher outputs. This is why people generally use 250k in strats and teles; they don't have a high of output, so the freqs which get through are only the very highest, which can be pretty piercing on strats and teles in the absence of a buffer (check out a tele with a treble bleed circuit). High output humbuckers are usually used with 500k or even 1m pots to keep the treble loss to a minimum, and the output to a maximum.

 

If you're using a lower output guitar, especially one already fitted with a 250k volume pot, you probably won't have a big difference in sound. I your using super distortions, you probably will. also, if you put it after pedals that boost the volume, there will probably be a noticeable difference in tone.

 

On the other hand, having such a low value resistor is one of the things that gives EBjr. it's famous even taper. with single coils, a 500k pot would have much more of a 'hump' because the resistance gets to a certain point, and none of the signal can get through to the ground, even though the pot can still be rotated to a 'louder' setting. If your using loud pickups, a 500k pot should be plenty smooth, provided it's audio taper.

 

so there.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

I've never been clear on what its purpose is exactly, but on my EB pedal, there is that little hidden switch under the toe, which is supposed to be some kind of buffer or impedance adjustment.

 

Whatever, my EB is the nicest I've owned. Its solid, and will probably be on my board for the next 20 years, you know?

 

I use my volume pedal instead of drive pedals, or even my amps channel switch. The Morley did have the volume adjustment like mentioned above, which was cool, but the feel of it wasn't as smooth, or something, as the EB.

 

I am curious about the Visual Sounds visual volume, I read they were re-releasing that and had fixed the flaws in the older models... anyone know?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

EB vp jr... some rigs they suck tone, others they just control volume... Don't use the tuner out, that's for sure.


I LOVE mine, I've used it everyday for the past 2 years.

 

 

curious about that, why not using the tuner out? it changes the tone?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

For some rigs it's different... in mine it feels like it truly sucks half of the sound out of the signal. It may be because I use mine first in the chain and there is no buffer in front of it. I thought it may just be my pedal, but a few months ago someone on here mentioned that their VP jr was totally destroying their tone, they said they had a cable plugged into the tuner out... I told em to take it out and they said it worked great afterwards.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

You can't use the volume knob for swells and fades while both of your hands are already busy playing. I think most of the people here using volume pedals are using them with lots of effects (ebow, delay, reverb, etc) and just using them to controll dynamics and for synth pad-like sounds... that's what i'll be using it for too. I'm gonna get the 25K ernie ball one though and use it in the FX loop of my amp, so that I don't lose gain or much treble when backing off on volume.... just controlling the volume

 

Agreed. I tend to use my EB for swells with lots of delay, a la Petrucci. At the moment, I use the 250k in front, but in time I'm going to get a 25k for the loop :thu:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members
i'm pretty happy with my Ernie Ball vp jr.

but one issue i have with it, is that, when in distortion, the volume only recognizably swells when your're about three quarters into closing the pedal.

If you have a high impedance pedal and you place it after a buffered device (i.e. FX or FX loop) then you are going to experience this problem. If you want to put an EB pedal anywhere in the chain *except* right after the guitar then you need the low impedance 25K version.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...