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How does your band practice?


avapxia

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We used to wear earplugs. Both me and the bassist had $100 molded earplugs with flat frequency a 25 decibel cut. They sounded pretty good, but obviously not as clear as not wearing them.

 

Well one of our PA speakers blew so in the last few months we've started using closed-back headphones with a mixer. It sounds way better. The decibel cut from the headphones protects your ears, and you hear the mix (including vocals, with reverb or whatever) as you would on a CD. I would never go back to PA practice.

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plug in, turn up, rock out.


nothing fancy.


how do you stop the headphones falling off...gaffa tape?

 

 

Headphones don't just fall off... they rest on your skull. And if we just turned up and played my ears would be destroyed in a matter of months.

 

 

we practice with vocals running through a direct box into my jc-120 and no other mics. do yall mic the drums? i'd be interested to know what specific equipment yall use because we need to get a better setup.

 

 

We mic the kick drum + 1 overhead. We run the bass DI into the headphones but he also plays through his two cabs which fills it out more. Then we mic the guitar with a Beta 57.

 

+ 2 vocal mics. We started using a {censored}ty Behringer mixer, but have sinve gotten a Firepod & computer and run cubase like a monitoring system. It's helpful because we can just hit record and jam, or record specific ideas, etc. It has made us much more effective.

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Might as well record your songs and practice at home separate.
:freak:
it is uncool to have band practice with headphones. How could you create those magic moments tru headphones. -you need to move some air



The air is moving. If you take off your headphones it will be 100+ decibels. The headphones act as "earplugs" that provide the ultimate in clarity.

I couldn't see them staying on my head for long.....or the drummers either. It doesn't seem very practical to me.



I guess it depends on your stage antics. We don't have a problem with it, but then again we're not kicking around or doing windmills. Professional musician's headphones are pretty tight on there, and there is always the in-ear option...

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I try to have practice as close to the way shows will be as possible. Which is why we use a {censored}ty PA with {censored}ty mics because most shows are like that for me. Using headphones and the best quality stuff will always make you disappointed. Which is why good studio engineers burn CDs of their mixes and listen to them in their cars to really test drive their recordings. Their studio quality monitors aren't going to play you what the general public's car stereos are.

 

I use ear plugs sometimes, for practice purposes, but when I'm trying to EQ my amp or the PA, I don't use them for obvious reasons.

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Plug in, plug up (ears), rock out. My drummer is a madman, and he's two-sevenths deaf, so it only has to get louder when he has earplugs on top of his natural attenuation. He always used to ask me to turn up, but my cranked clean channel cuts a lot better now. :thu: Bassist is using two 1x15 cabs just to be heard. Drums are LOUD.

And all this in a 10x10 room.

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We used to wear earplugs. Both me and the bassist had $100 molded earplugs with flat frequency a 25 decibel cut. They sounded pretty good, but obviously not as clear as not wearing them.


Well one of our PA speakers blew so in the last few months we've started using closed-back headphones with a mixer. It sounds way better. The decibel cut from the headphones protects your ears, and you hear the mix (including vocals, with reverb or whatever) as you would on a CD. I would never go back to PA practice.

 

 

we have done this,but we prefer live practice.

we use a QSC rmx 2450,Behringer 16 channel board,stereo sonic maximizer,all through a furman conditioner,this setup pushes through 4 Yahmaha Club V series 15" two ways two wedged on the floor and two on stands we mic the kick for the drummer and have 3 mics for vocals.our bassist runs an ampeg head through a mesa 2x10 and a 1x15 ,lead guiatrist uses a mesa dual rec roadster,with a digitech 2120 for effects through a mesa v30 cab,i use a hot rod deluxe with a HBE power screamer:thu: for rythymn.all EV mics and moster cables.and we use a roland vs-890 to record.we have a 24x24 studio.(took us 5 years to build this set up,no our dads didnt buy any of it,this is working class funded all the way,and were pretty {censored}in proud of ourselves)

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I try to have practice as close to the way shows will be as possible. Which is why we use a {censored}ty PA with {censored}ty mics because most shows are like that for me. Using headphones and the best quality stuff will always make you disappointed. Which is why good studio engineers burn CDs of their mixes and listen to them in their cars to really test drive their recordings. Their studio quality monitors aren't going to play you what the general public's car stereos are.


Well said...:thu:

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We play loud in a decent room. Drummer is loud as {censored}. All loud tube amps for guitar and bass.

 

Earplugs are pretty necessary, or we couldn't really hear after a few practices.

I always wear earplugs at shows, too. I can hear a lot better that way. I'm just used to it now.

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We practice through a PA as well. Nothing all that fancy though. Nothing is micd except for the vocals, and one overhead(drums) condenserr. The only reason for the condenser is because the drummer almost always wears earpieces, so he likes to have a tad bit of drums in his mix.

We use two powered carvin 300 watt monitors, a mackie 12 channel mixer for practice, and just a couple beta 58A vocal mics. We jack everything into the mixer to make a mix for the drummer(for his "in ears"), but the only thing that actualy plays through the speakers is vocals. My singer uses a midi rack setup for some compression and light delay/verb.

Nothing too fancy, but its very representative of what we hear on stage when playing, so there are no surprises at any gigs. We keep things pretty quiet too......so we are all real good at playing with almost no stage volume at all. For the longest time, both me and my bass player used ALL high end digital/midi modeling stuff.....no amps at all on stage(so naturally....hardly any stage volume)! We used to practice that way too. No amps....all the modeling stuff through the PA speakers. That kinda setup doesnt work very well in small venues though cause the sound isnt as beleivable with minimal speaker coverage(even the best modeling stuff doesnt sound right unless its really driven with lots of speakers to fill out the sound).

He has an SVT4 pro and I have a mesa triple recto solo and a 4X12 Krankenstein cab. Although the modeling stuff is real nice and convenient......we use our real amps most of the time anymore.

In order to take your band out of the practice room and repeat what you do on stage......I highly suggest trying to mimic the "stage" setting within the practice room. If you sound good at rehearsal....you will sound just as good everywhere if you have practice with, and are prepared to adapt/integrate to the stage setting. Whether you like it or not....make things sound best from an audience perspective(what you hear 5 feet in front of your setup aint the same as people 30 feet back). Then get used to practicing that way. Dont be selfish now.....turn that amp down if it makes the mix sound better!

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Yeah, I'm surprised by the responses. It doesn't inhibit the "feel" of practice, and the headphones don't slide or get thrown off your head.

Most of all, the SOUND QUALITY is as good as it gets. No foam in between you and the sound, no 100+ decibels shredding your ears, etc.

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