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Keys through a Twin... hm?


garyfanclub

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So a few weeks ago I decided that my band could benefit from not only having a dedicated keyboard player, we could also use another person on keys who could do more "ambient" stuff such as swells and pads while the other dude plays actual piano and melody. So I suggested that I fill this role, as I have a decent midi set up, much to the aggravation of the other guitarist who INSISTS that we need two guitars at all times. I said {censored} it, brought my MIDI gear to practice, and ran it through my '65 Twin RI. Sounded great, better than the keyboard players stuff through the PA. Not to mention that what I was playing fit some songs better than another guitar did.

 

My question is, am I going to damage my amp by doing this? I'm pretty careful about the bass frequencies, but I reasoned that Fender /did/ design the Rhodes to run through a Twin, so how much damage could I do?

 

Anyone have any experience/advice?

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don't have much to contribute, so consider this a bump... but couldn't one player play both keyboards through the twin and cover both bases leaving you free to play guitar?

 

 

Well the Twin is my guitar amp as well. I have the keys going into the Normal channel and the guitar going into the Vibrato channel. The keyboard player also has a MIDI controller and a Microkorg to 'ef with so he has his hands full for the most part.

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A Fender Rhodes sounded great through my 1972 Super Reverb. Keys definetly do work through a guitar amp. The Twin has plenty of headroom, so you won't have to worry about the keyboard distorting. My Super Reverb however can't be turned past 4 with the Rhodes, or else it gets pretty nasty when overdriven too much.

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But don't most keyboards put out line level at their main outs? That's a much hotter signal than your guitar's instrument level output. I might be a little concerned about this until I was given definitive evidence that you won't fry your amp's input or something like that. If I recall correctly, the Rhodes also isn't amplified at its output like most electronic synths.

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But don't most keyboards put out line level at their main outs? That's a much hotter signal than your guitar's instrument level output. I might be a little concerned about this until I was given definitive evidence that you won't fry your amp's input or something like that. If I recall correctly, the Rhodes also isn't amplified at its output like most electronic synths.

 

 

The sound is coming out of my laptop's output, not the actual keys... but i'm not sure about line level in that sense.

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Ok, so to clear some things up. I don't have a direct answer for your setup specifically, other than to say like others have said, watch the bass. keyboards and midi instruments can cover basically the full range of frequencies, really low to really high. Your 65 RI should be ok as it does have a lot of headroom, but as you might know, guitar amps aren't meant to reproduce bass tones as they don't have a subwoofer, whereas dedicated keyboard amps, and PA's have subwoofers. As far as the Rhodes, electric piano thing, yes, rhodes can and should (IMO) be played through guitar amps, tube amps and the like. In fact Fender tested their rhodes pianos through Twins at the factory. yep. hope that helps, i've been having questions myself as to the bass response of my deville 212, im running a rhodes through it with a low pass filter...yikes.

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I am mostly a keys player and some guitar. I use a 1979 twin with the ultra-linear output transformer. It seems to have a more natural, broader frequency range than other twins. The twin is designed to be freaking loud, so it can handle keys and bass. Most guitar amps I wouldn't use, but a twin sounds great with keys IMHO.

 

I wouldn't worry about blowing a speaker unless you are doing crazy low moog bass sounds, or running a rhodes with low pass filter(!)

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I used to play guitar and keys in a band. I had a late 70s SF Twin and plugged the guitar into the reverb/trem side and the keys into the "dry" side. It worked great and I never blew anything. Sometimes, there can be distortion, but in that case, just turn the keys output down and the Twin volume up. That's the beauty of having independent channels.

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I used to play guitar and keys in a band. I had a late 70s SF Twin and plugged the guitar into the reverb/trem side and the keys into the "dry" side. It worked great and I never blew anything. Sometimes, there can be distortion, but in that case, just turn the keys output down and the Twin volume up. That's the beauty of having independent channels.

 

 

Yep, that's what I've been doing! It does work beautifully.

 

Thanks for the feedback everyone.

 

...and yes rhodes pianos kick all kinds of ass.

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