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Something I never understood about Fender amps


veil

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Also, why double inputs for each channel?

:confused:
:confused:
:confused:
:confused::poke:

 

One is higher gain the other lower, again same deal on old Marshalls and many other amps. They thought somebody actually might not want to drive the amp hard, what an odd thought huh?

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I've never noticed one channel on a Fender or old Marshall as being higher gain than the other. On the Marshalls one is brighter. Fenders were made I believe so you could plug two instruments in. Other than the reverb/tremolo circuits, I believe the tone is the same.

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I've never noticed one channel on a Fender or old Marshall as being higher gain than the other. On the Marshalls one is brighter. Fenders were made I believe so you could plug two instruments in. Other than the reverb/tremolo circuits, I believe the tone is the same.

 

 

input 1 is louder on fenders and old 4 hole marshalls.

 

the normal channel on fender amps sounds different

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There's more gain on the vibrato channel. The unused half of one of the reverb tubes is used as an extra gain stage. The normal channel is cleaner. As to the two inputs on each channel, the #1 input has one 68kohm resistor on it and the #2 input has two. A humbucker guitar works better in the #2 input because it cuts down on the input and makes it comparable to a single coil in input #1. It evens things out.

 

One cool thing to do is plug your guitar into input #1, then run a cord from input #2 to another amp. This is the easiest way to run two amps at the same time. You can also run both channels of the same amp at the same time with this trick.

 

Some people also run an A/B box and set the two channels up differently. It's like switching between two amps.

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input 1 is louder on fenders and old 4 hole marshalls.


the normal channel on fender amps sounds different

 

 

The only difference between the two "channels" on my old Marshall Super Lead was one was a bit brighter. No difference in gain. I've never noticed a gain difference in old Fenders either.

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There's more gain on the vibrato channel. The unused half of one of the reverb tubes is used as an extra gain stage. The normal channel is cleaner. As to the two inputs on each channel, the #1 input has one 68kohm resistor on it and the #2 input has two. A humbucker guitar works better in the #2 input because it cuts down on the input and makes it comparable to a single coil in input #1. It evens things out.


One cool thing to do is plug your guitar into input #1, then run a cord from input #2 to another amp. This is the easiest way to run two amps at the same time. You can also run both channels of the same amp at the same time with this trick.


Some people also run an A/B box and set the two channels up differently. It's like switching between two amps.

 

 

Fascinating! Thank you. :)

 

While we're here, can anyone lay down some knowledge as to pulling tubes on a TR without hurting it? There's something about different ohmage, but I don't really know.

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aren't the 2 channels on the twin reverb out of phase of one another?


wouldn't that make it hard to blend the two channels??

 

 

Ya, it doesn't work with every Fender, the reverb models have an extra gain stage so they are out of phase with each other.

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Ya, it doesn't work with every Fender, the reverb models have an extra gain stage so they are out of phase with each other.

 

 

yes, but at least on an older pro reverb i owned, you coul djumper the channels, turn the reverb WAY up (past surf levels) and keep that channel volume low in the mix. The sound was different, but still very useable in some contexts.

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My old '67 Bassman (which I currently run the effects output of my YCV50 into in parallel with a tonebone>eq>reverb into the bass channel[this sounds really thick and awesome, by the way]) has two inputs for each channel and input 1 is always a little louder in both cases.

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Whoa whoa whoa.


What.

 

 

Ok, so it goes like this:

 

Guitar(Usually Strat)>A/B Splitter>

 

Path A>Traynor YCV50 Dirty Channel>(Line Out)>Bassman Normal Input 2

 

Path B>Tonebone Classic>EQ>Reverb>Bass Input 1

 

The Traynor puts out through its own speaker in this setup and both Bassman channels are put out through a 15 inch Black Widow speaker.

 

So essentially, the way I have everything EQed the Traynor becomes the treble control, the Normal channel is a little darker/Midrange and the Bass channel is well...Bassy.

 

That's my distortion rig. Sounds a little like Smashing Pumpkins, actually.

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