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OT: Suggestions for a record player?


tenoken

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I'm getting back into collecting records again (mostly old jazz, some punk and some of my favorite rock albums...)

 

I don't want to spend too much or get a "DJ" type turntable. Just something straight up that has a line out. I'm not sure how important 'portability' is, as I don't plan to take it out of the house...

 

Any ideas? Budget for this is up to $130 or so.

 

Here is a list of some:

 

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/search-handle-url/index=blended&field-keywords=record%20player&results-process=default&dispatch=search/ref=pd_sl_aw_hhh-1_blended_42366782_2&results-process=default

 

The Crosley ones look cool and vintage-y. Anyone have one? What about the low-end Numarks? Are they any good?

 

Thanks

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I have the entry model Sony turntable. Its nice because its suer easy to use, as there are only 2 plugs on it. The outs are just rca jacks which i got an adapter for to plug in to my stereo system. The needles are easy to change too, and easiest to find.

 

I think these go for about $80 on ebay new.

 

i_sony_wideweb__470x341,0.jpg

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If you are going to play collectible vinyl then I would highly recommend using a table that costs a bit more than $80-$130.

Cheap turntables are record erasers, in other words they are far more damaging to your records than playing them on a quality table.


I would say look at the Pro-Ject III as a good table that isn't going to destroy your records, it goes for $329.00 new from www.needledoctor.com

Original vinyl is not replacable and some of the discs you are talking about are worth as much or more than what a cheap toy player costs.

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Just something straight up that has a line out.

 

 

 

I'd also suggest a Technics direct drive.

 

Turntables don't output at line voltage. If your stereo preamp doesn't have an input marked "phono", you will need a phono preamp to mate your turntable to the stereo preamp. This will also give you the proper RIAA equalization for vinyl.

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The Audio Technica AT-PL50 looks good for the price and it has a preamp in case your stereo has no phono input. I don't think you need to spend more than $100.

 

I have one of these. My vinyl is still perfectly fine. I am definitely going to get something nicer when I have the spare funds, but for the price its perfectly decent.

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pro-ject debut.

no idea if you can get them there or how much, but they are the best budget turntable you can buy in the UK for the money.....

and no, unless you are a dj you don't want a friggin' technics....they are great for djing but you can get better sounding hi-fi turntables for less money.

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Some Technics turntables were really good for consumer decks. Some were horrible. Avoid anything made after about 1983 because that's about when they became plastic garbage. I have an SL-D202 on loan to a friend that I got for $50, missing a dustcover but otherwise perfect. It came with the original Technics EPS-U22 cartridge and the plinth was nice and heavy. Had the usual S-shaped arm that most Japanese turntables of the era had.

 

For your budget I would say look for an old Dual turntable. You can score these for cheap often on Craigslist and the like, and spend the rest of your budget on a cartridge with an elliptical stylus. A fineline stylus or line contact would be even better but these are not only more expensive but also more sensitive to adjustments like vertical tracking angle and tracking force. I would recommend something like a Grado Black - this is just about the best cheap cart anywhere IMO. I have a Dual CS 508(be careful, the CS series needs proprietary cartridges or an adapter...neither are too cheap) which sounds great for what it is. It has an ultra lightweight tonearm and tracks very well. My research indicated it would be a good holdover until I could get a Pro-Ject Debut III in lime green.

 

You need a phono stage to use a turntable...either one that's built into your stereo amp or an external one. A few low end turntables have them built in.

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Some Technics turntables were really good for consumer decks. Some were horrible. Avoid anything made after about 1983 because that's about when they became plastic garbage.

 

 

 

My 1980 SL-D1 (completely manual) has never malfunctioned and certainly doesn't damage my records. A good cartridge with properly adjusted tracking force and anti-skating shouldn't do vinyl records any harm.

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Tenoken, you might want to check out Rock & Roll Heaven and tell Ray that you are looking out for one. He helped me find mine. I'm sure he'll have some suggestions as well, even if he doesn't have one available. He's honest about what is crap, and what isn't.

 

 

I was in there yesterday! He seems like a straight shooter, and a cool dude if you're on his good side. I like their selection, but their prices are coo-coo! Right afterwards I went to Park Ave CD's and found some of the same records for 20 or 30% less.

 

But anyway, re: the player I'll try to stop back in there and see what he says.

 

-------

 

@ El Glom: amazing avatar man!

 

It seems there is a lot to consider, which I kind of expected. I don't know anything about pre-1983, tension, needles, making adjustments, damaging records or any of that...

 

All I's know is that I don't want a $400 DJ-marketed deal. I don't plan to play records that often or collect records that are worth more than $30 or 40 bucks tops. Right now I'm just grabbing records that are selling for up to $20.

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Here's a link to a Technics SL-D2 on eBay:

http://cgi.ebay.com/Vintage-Technics-SL-D2-Direct-Drive-Automatic-Turntable_W0QQitemZ260189493668QQihZ016QQcategoryZ48649QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

Although described as an "automatic", it's really a semi-auto. You must place the stylus on the record (using the cueing lever, of course), and when it gets to the disc's run-out groove, it lifts the stylus automatically.

A fresh cartridge would probably make it good as new, well within your budget.


When you get your turntable, put on a copy of The Who's "Pictures of Lily", and consider that the photo that is my avatar was taken in 1970.

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Not that I pretend to be a connoisseur of turntable technology, but isn't that a bit of an extreme statement about a brand of turntables that is an industry standard?

 

 

Yes and no...

 

The industry standard table was really pretty crappy compared to the very small number of high end turntables back then and even today.

 

Back in the day some of the Thorens were pretty good, AR made some nice ones, Linn was a great table but hardly anybody even heard of them.

 

The industry standard was focused on gimmicks like built in strobe lights and autoplay not building quality playing machines that track well.

 

Few people back then or today even have heard a vinyl record played back on a really quality turntable, and I'm not talking about some insane huge seperate motor thing that cost tens of thousands of dollars. Just a table that is well built to play records.

 

Pro-Ject, Music Hall, and Rega make really nice tables that don't cost totally ridiculous money. I have owned a Linn LP12 for quite a few years now (payed $450 for it used which was pretty good) and I still consider it to be one of the best investments I have made in a piece of musical gear.

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Sota Moonbeam and Grato cartridge here. I think you would do well with any new stanton or gemini or whatever just find a needle/stylus that isn't made for scratch Djs as that will cause some needle burn over time for sure. Lower output needles may sound better than some mega punched up high output needles in the lower price range categories. Those Dual brand turntables suggested above are pretty fantastic for little money at all...

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