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Compressed sound cuts better throught the mix?


Fir3Spell

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i seriously think its all up to your eq setting, not to mention the amp you're using. think of a compression as a 'sweetener' that adds squish, sustain, grit (to the dirt channel) and volume.

 

i've never had a problem of cutting through, but then again i'm using marginally good tube amps live (went thru a JTM45, an Orange AD30, occasionally used an AC30 , and now using a Diezel Einstein), also i like to spend time messing around and getting used to each amp's EQ section.

 

check out the telenordia clips (www.telenordia.de) to see what a well built, good sounding compressor would sound like in front of good amps.

 

btw, i'm using a Teese Compressor. Its good, and sounds much like a ross compressor.

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I have a fender hot rod deluxe so no problem here.

But remember that a compressor isn't only those things that you said...

If increases the weak signal and decreases the louder signals turning your sound into a "uniform" wave.

 

PS: What's squish? :S

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PS: What's squish? :S



essentially slang for


If [sic] increases the weak signal and decreases the louder signals turning your sound into a "uniform" wave.


you are "squishing" the dynamic range into a smaller interval

:)

(one note on this, often with this you can get attack artifacts, which may be interpreted as "squish" - that's the "But remember that a compressor isn't only those things that you said..." thing...all the things mentioned are apparent effects created by the process of compressing and associated gain compensation)


Will it hlp you "cut through" -- well it depends on the nature of the problem -- a compressor can increase your "talkpower" by allowing you to get more apparent volume (as the avg signal level can be boosted w/o clipping)

but the funadamental problem with "the mix" can be that there is simply too much going on in the spectral footprint of your intrument, so trying to overpower that can just make things more crowded and messy and muddy (like trying to fix watercolor paint with more painting...you wind up with brown everywhere)

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I have a fender hot rod deluxe so no problem here.

But remember that a compressor isn't only those things that you said...

If increases the weak signal and decreases the louder signals turning your sound into a "uniform" wave.


PS: What's squish? :S

 

 

- i figured someone question like 'will a compressor help me cut thru' would already have that accounted for.

 

- i find that compressors are a good way to get the 'tube sag' sound, which i have a good feeling that most people call a 'squishy sound'. think of the main verse riff of RHCP's "Funky Monks", off of Blood Sugar, the solo off of 'Another Brick in the Wall'...

 

very vocal sounding. obviously compressed before mixdown. although Another Brick... is probably natural tube compression

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Mid's actually is what allows you to cut through the mix, though most people don't want to add mids to their sound.

 

 

Too much mids makes everything mush though? I think it is about having one guy have heavier mids, and one guy have more treble, and leaving most of the bass for bass.

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Hmm

I want to have an awnser for this question because i'm sick of the tone sucking and noise that my CS-3 produces.. I want to know if i should trade it for other (and which?) or just keep my pedalboard without compressor.


:cop:



but really, get a better compressor before discounting what compression does.

another good reference is Trey Anastasio's tone from Phish. Compressed, but very good tone. His clean tone is a good source for the 'squishy' sound i'm talking about, not to mention his rig feeds back at command.

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Too much mids makes everything mush though? I think it is about having one guy have heavier mids, and one guy have more treble, and leaving most of the bass for bass.

 

 

Nope, taking mids away turns everything into mush. Good example of midrange - The Edge, Jimmy Page.

 

take midrange away, and you've got that Sweetwater demo video in the amp forum. Gobs of {censored}e.

 

thats a really poor way of configuring your live sound too.

 

each player/setup has its own voice. you'll find that different places commands different eq settings, unless you have a dedicated sound guy.

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Nope, taking mids away turns everything into mush. Good example of midrange - The Edge, Jimmy Page.


take midrange away, and you've got that Sweetwater demo video in the amp forum. Gobs of {censored}e.


thats a really poor way of configuring your live sound too.


each player/setup has its own voice. you'll find that different places commands different eq settings, unless you have a dedicated sound guy.

 

 

Wasn't the case in my last band. Guitarists mids cut everyone else out of the mix.

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yes a compressor smooths the signals out to work with each other. a must for multiple instruments playing together.

tube amps have natural compression , tube compression is important in differenr uses.

compress you bass, the 4 strings will be closeer to equal volume. a pesky problem, people fool with pup height wasting time.

the strings need to be closer to each others volume, YES a comp helps with this.

there are canelling frequencing that need to be removed, a comp will help this.


the good compressors have no coloring or tone loss, those are crap rumors. in reality the compressors improve tone because people can hear your music!

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ahaha @ pic

But which compressor should i buy?

By the way, i have a tube amp (fender hot rod deluxe)

 

 

so far i've tried Analogman's Bicomp. that thing was SO toneful. i kick myself on selling it whenever i think about it.

 

I've had the chance to play thru the Keeley, highly recommended. Smooth, natural compression.

 

I ended up w/the FK-1 due to the blowout that was going on a while ago. cant beat the $80 tag, and it comparable to the Keeley. I think its even smaller than it as well...

 

a lot of people here like the Barber Tone Press.

The Diamond Compressor looks like a badass for the tag. Not many compressors come with an EQ section, which might actually be what makes it for you (with the mix-issue discussed earlier)

 

If $$ is no issue, That Telenordia comp looks/sounds SO good...but its $400.

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Hmm

I want to have an awnser for this question because i'm sick of the tone sucking and noise that my CS-3 produces.. I want to know if i should trade it for other (and which?) or just keep my pedalboard without compressor.


:cop:



Any True by-pass compressor will not suck your tone. Analogman, Keeley, Toadworks...A Visual Sound Route 66 would be ok too even though it's buffered. It shouldn't suck tone anything like the Boss. My H20 from VS is pretty true. They are making a compressor only model now as well.

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Compression can make your tone cut LESS if you aren't careful. If you snip off the attack of your picking transient, there goes all your punch. If you aren't cutting through the mix, I'd first concentrate on EQ/tone balancing off of one another and most importantly, arrangements.

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