Jump to content

Jazz Guitar?


Recommended Posts

  • Members

Can anyone steer in the right direction or the right websites to learn how to play jazz guitar. I love jazz music but so far its been hard for me to pickup the technique and theory or it. So maybe you guys can help me.

 

As a reference I want to be learn solo jazz guitar similar to this style here: http://www.dimarzio.com/site/#/pickups/. After you bring up the page go to humbuckers and then Medium Power and then click on Evolution Neck. From there click on Modern by Trey Alexander in the sound bytes section of Sound. Please check this out this is some of the best solo jazz guitar I've heard.

 

I also want to learn how to do some of the cool chord/lead things in this song here:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Jazz is {censored}ing harddddd. When I lived in Toronto, I went down to improv nights at a club called the Rex all the time and watched the jazz players there. Insane what they can pull off.

My favourite jazzy thing is the whole note scale. If you listen to John Coltrane's solos at all he plays around in that scale all the time and it just seems to fit 'cause it's so out there. Learn that and muck around with it, lots of fun!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members
^Lol i was just listening to him before. I'll try to listen to what your talking about.



Ummm... I'm at work with no guitar but here's a rough tab of that scale starting on C, but you can do it anywhere:



I think thats right.. :)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

I would say the two examples you mentioned are fairly different in style.

In the youtube video, this a fairly straight-forward version of chord-melody solo style - this is very difficult to pull off. First of all you need to know the tunes - jazz standards - it would be good to get a Real Book and start playing them. Even more important - start listening to them - ALOT. I teach jazz guitar and that's one of the biggest deficiencies among jazz guitar students - they don't care enough about the music to listen and learn from it - they just like the idea of learning jazz guitar. It won't work if you don't listen.

Also knowing chord voicings of maj7/min7/7/m7b5 chords all over the neck is essential for solo guitar, since you often have to play the melody as the highest note of the chord. He also includes walking bass lines - this isn't too hard once you have a good grasp of chords/arpeggios. You also need to have a basic grasp of how to improvise over chord changes.

Joe Pass is often considered the gold standard of improvised solo jazz guitar - he has tons of books out, so you might consider looking at them.

Overall, I'd say the best bet is to work on learning the instrument - chord voicings, scales/modes (modes of major and melodic minor scale, diminished/whole-tone/pentatonic and blues scales) and arpeggios! Being able to play chord tones (arpeggios) all over the neck is very important, since this really gets to the heart of the matter. I like Mark Levine's Jazz Theory Book as a non-guitar resource for understanding the nuts and bolts of jazz.

In other words, I would start learning the theory on the guitar better, and start learning the language by transcribing, learning licks, tunes, etc. A good teacher can break everything down for you and you can start learning all this. It takes a while, but its better than spending your whole life boxed into a pentatonic scale.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Jazz guitar is hard, very hard. You have to learn a lot of theory to become proficient in jazz guitar, which deters a lot of people. But, mark my words, you'll be rewarded for effort. Also its really good if you get a teacher to help you because learning by yourself could be hard. What would you say your proficiency level would be?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Most important thing is learning tunes. If you don't learn any tunes, all the theory and technique in the world won't mean a thing. Did you learn theory before you learned rock/metal/blues/etc tunes? Theory is good at explaining things afterwards ... it's not a great method for learning a whole style of music.

 

Start with tunes you really dig and then go from there. Theory later. And all this nonsense about jazz being hard is a bit over-the-top imo. Too many styles of jazz to ever make that assessement.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members
Most important thing is
learning tunes
. If you don't learn any tunes, all the theory and technique in the world won't mean a thing.



:thu:

Jazz is all about the tunes, y'all. The tune in the 2nd video is "Days Of Wine and Roses" and is found in this book:

The Standards Real Book

If you really like that tune, get this book. And get it before any other jazz book.

To get started in jazz, you only need enough theory to make sense of a jazz chart/lead sheet, which is the format used in a "real book" such as the above book and other volumes of Sher's Real Book series. This is all you need to start:

What the intervals are

You can chain them together to make melodies, or you can stack them to make chords. Good interval knowledge will help you steal melodic ideas from your favorite soloists, and ideas for chords. It will also help you put your own solos together.

How to construct a chord

So, for example if you're learning a tune, and it has a Ebmin7b5, you just need to know what all the notes of that chord are find them on the guitar.

A good free website that I found for learning both of the above is

http://lessons.mikedodge.com/

Start with these:

Interval Lesson

Chord Construction Lesson

Get a recording device asap, if you don't have one already. Record the chords of the tune, then overdub the melody. For an interesting twist, record the melody first, then overdub the chords. Use a metronome to keep time while recording. Then, have fun mucking about with soloing and crap on top of your recording.

I don't recommend spending too much time on technical exercises, studying every possible permutation of scales and modes, etc. Your first priority should be learning the tunes. Old jazzers say you ought to learn 40-100 tunes. This will be more valuable to your jazz development than knowing a bunch of theory, flashy guitar technique, and not being able to play both the melody and the chords to even just one tune.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Ya i picked up an instructional book on jazz last year. i dont remember which one it is (its at home and im at work). books with cd's very useful because they usuallly have rhythm tracks and you can practice with them. you will want to find one that shows different traids/arpeggios/scales and when to use them. jazz is a complicated beast but super fun to play.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...