Jump to content

Does an EQ pedal/gear exist w my desired specs?


kingswebe

Recommended Posts

  • Members

Hi,

 

I am wondering if there is any Equalization units in the market (yester-year products are fine, too - not just the latest tech) that allow the User to specify which EQ bands he wants to cut or boost? Meaning, all the units I've seen only give you 7 - 10 specific EQ bands to tweak - well, what if I want to cut or boost a range that's not included in those 7 - 10, like the 633 Hz band, just as an example.

 

I would be using this unit for live-playing, so I would not be interested in software-based solutions, but instead (in order of preference) 1) stompboxes, 2) rack gear.

 

Thanks in advance for your suggestions!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Do you have to specify the exact frequency? Parametric EQ's allow you to sweep the frequencies that are boost/cut, but generally this is in an "analog" fashion. If you need to get "EXACTLY" 633Hz, you will need some kind of digital EQ.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

king;

 

how many bands do you think you'll need?

 

 

as mentioned up above, sweep/parametric EQ (sweep is just parametric with a fixed Q) allow you to choose dial in the center frequency of the band you are eqing -- but they, typically, come ganged in fewer bands (often you see hi-mid and lo-mid sweepable tone controls, or 3-5 or so bands of para eq)

 

These are sort of ommon on mxing console and acoustic instrument applications (where defining what "hi-mid" actually is can really change the character of the sound)

 

another thing to consider that just got mentioned, when you dial in an EQ's "frequency" that is the CENTER frequency of the filter...the frequencies around that center frequency are also effected -- so it's not like setting an eq for 633 hz is only effecting 633hz -- you know that sign-wavey chart you see on some graphic EQs for hi fis and such...that's a chart to give you an idea of how the EQ is going to alter different areas...a single frequency (infinite Q) EQ would be a few completely vertical lines

 

 

(fr some applications, like feedback supression a very very "tight", high Q filter is run to get close to that...but here's the deal, that's done to kill the resonance of the feedback while NOT significantly altering the tone)

 

a few guys use graphics that are more comprehensive (more bands, often shelving filters for the hi and the lo) so that might be worth checking out

 

----

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

The BYOC EQ kit lets you choose which frequencies the different sliders will control depending on which capacitors you place there. If you do the math I'm sure you can come up with any frequency you want to control. If that exact value doesn't exist, I think you can put 2 caps in parallel with different resistors to get the exact value you want.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
  • Members

king;


... when you dial in an EQ's "frequency" that is the CENTER frequency of the filter...the frequencies around that center frequency are also effected -- so it's not like setting an eq for 633 hz is only effecting 633hz ...



----

 

 

Hmmm... if that's the case, then what is parametric EQ doing that is any different? Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Hi,


I am wondering if there is any Equalization units in the market (yester-year products are fine, too - not just the latest tech) that allow the User to specify which EQ bands he wants to cut or boost? Meaning, all the units I've seen only give you 7 - 10 specific EQ bands to tweak - well, what if I want to cut or boost a range that's not included in those 7 - 10, like the 633 Hz band, just as an example.


I would be using this unit for live-playing, so I would not be interested in software-based solutions, but instead (in order of preference) 1) stompboxes, 2) rack gear.


Thanks in advance for your suggestions!

 

 

 

A parametric equaliser is exactly what you want.

 

You can choose the exact frequency, and how wide or narrow the range is around that centre frequency (called the Q, or bandwidth).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Hmmm... if that's the case, then what is parametric EQ doing that is any different? Thanks!

 

 

Well, each band on a parametric EQ has a Q control, that selects the amount of bandwidth of that centre frequency. A high Q results in a narrower bandwidth, whereas a low Q is a wide bandwidth.

 

 

A 'sweep eq' has the Q pre-determined. A parametric eq has its Q determined by the user.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
  • Members

Well, each band on a parametric EQ has a Q control, that selects the amount of bandwidth of that centre frequency. A high Q results in a narrower bandwidth, whereas a low Q is a wide bandwidth.



A 'sweep eq' has the Q pre-determined. A parametric eq has its Q determined by the user.

 

 

Hey since you are the Mad Professor of the Boosted Mids, I figured you would be proud to know I have recently joined the club. I just scored a used Fender Prosonic amp in mint condition last week. The clean channel on it is good, but doesn't have that glassy clean sound like the other classic Fender amps. Playing around w an EQ pedal placed btw my guitar and the amp and the clean channel, I found that I achieved that glassy sound by boosting the Mid frequencies. And similarly, I found that boosting the Mids on an EQ pedal btw the guitar and amp on the distortion channel gave me that late-80's thrash crunch sound I was also looking for.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...