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MP3 help..please!


melx

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If it's for use on my iPod or iTunes, I just adjust the starting position in the track info. Otherwise, I use Audacity, then export as WAV, then convert back to MP3 in iTunes.

 

 

I don't know if you care but I guess since we're all tone snobs around here you might, doing what you described will lower the quality. There are lossless ways of splitting MP3s instead.

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I found something called 'wavepad' and it seems to have done the trick.
:thu:



I use wavepad to edit any wav & mp3s, great free software. I used to have wavelab with an old Cubase bundle and it was great, but wavepad is just as good for my needs and free.

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I don't know if you care but I guess since we're all tone snobs around here you might, doing what you described will lower the quality. There are lossless ways of splitting MP3s instead.

No doubt. Usually when I'm doing this it's on something I've found online, which is already not at audiophile quality. Good point, though.

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this is what I would use


I woudl NOT use Audacity or anything else that decodes and re-encodes audio to achieve the split. recompressing a lossy decompressed file will turn the audio quality into rubbish. this isnt my opinion, its a fact. use a dedicated mp3 splitter instead.

 

 

Agreed, provided the amount of time you need to peel off isn't critical. MP3 is divided into frames, each containing the information needed to generate 1152 samples, or 576 samples if stereo. MP3 has no persistent "states" between frames, so you can start decoding at any frame without needing information from the frames that would have preceeded it. This is by design, since MP3 encoding was originally created for digital broadcasting, and it was presumed that people would need to be able to 'tune in' and start listening at any point in the broadcast.

 

In other words, you can drop entire frames from an MP3 file, and it will still play normally. The only thing the program has to manage is "extra" info that might be embedded in the file, like ID3V1 tags that might be at the end of the file, and ID3V2 tags that can theoretically be anywhere (but are usually at the beginning).

 

MP3 is a VERY lossy perceptual encoding format. Decompressing and recompressing will NOT result in the same data. Additional sound information is lost everytime it's recompressed. Any editing system that has to decompress first, which includes the majority of digital audio workstation programs, will degrade the quality of the recording.

 

This is a really good reason NOT to archive your music in MP3 format. Use a lossless compression system for archives, and use MP3 only when you need to transfer it to your portable music player.

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